Nismo GT-R confirmed


Nissan has confirmed a new and even more extreme Nismo GT-R off the back of opening a new and much enhanced headquarters for its performance and motorsport arm in Yokohama.

Last year's Track Pack previewed Nismo
Last year's Track Pack previewed Nismo
Now, we're pretty excited about the new 911 GT3. But as a result of on-track success with the GT3 version of the GT-R it looks like Nissan's near-obsessional desire to match the 911 blow-for-blow will result in an equivalent track-influenced GT-R. Which is promising.

This suggests last year's Track Pack car was just a teaser. Which, of course, we kind of knew already, talismanic GT-R project chief Mizuno-san outlining his vision for his baby in an article we titled 'World domination and the Nissan GT-R'.

That's been given some weight with the opening of an all-new Nismo facility yesterday by Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn, underlining the importance of Nismo's emergence as a global performance brand. The first production car off the back of that is the Juke Nismo, driven here recently, and confirmation of the 370Z Nismo not long after. The GT-R is the big one though and a natural flagship for the Nismo range.

Ghosn says Nismo range without GT-R 'unthinkable'
Ghosn says Nismo range without GT-R 'unthinkable'
"It would be unthinkable for us to develop a range of Nismo cars without including the GT-R," Ghosn is quoted as saying in the accompanying press release. "The standard car is a global supercar and the GT-R's performance on track reflects the passion and talents of the Nismo team."

Enough teasing - what can we expect? "We know that enthusiasts around the world will be itching to know more about the forthcoming GT-R Nismo," says Nismo president Shoichi Miyatani - no kidding - before adding: "It's too preliminary to share any details yet but fans can be certain we'll be applying all of our motorsport expertise to creating a GT-R Nismo worthy of the name." OK, more teasing then. But we can expect something more dramatic than the detail updates applied to the existing car at regular intervals thus far. The ones usually timed to coincide with any new 911 variant and involving a few more seconds trimmed from the 'ring lap.

More when we have it.

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Comments (44) Join the discussion on the forum

  • rps13tonio 26 Sep 2013

    The number 20 for production number of the z-tune r34 is correct. And to be able to get one, you had to be a current r34 nur spec owner, and you had to send in that car for the transformation proccess. Mileage had to be under 35k/km from what I understand, the chassis could have NO previous damage, and there could be no type of aftermarket modification done to the vehicle, unless previously done with NISMO parts, at an authorized NISMO installation shop. There was alot of prerequisites to converting to the z-tune, but as far as I know, as far as widely publicised gtr variations made by nissan/nismo themselves, the z-tune is, and more than likely always will be the rarest of them all.

  • y2blade 27 Feb 2013

    drophead said:
    The 7 year old playing Gran Turismo religiously every Saturday morning in me just went bonkers at this
    Same cloud9

  • wheedler 27 Feb 2013

    Buying the underdog always requires a long conversation into why. In my case some people even said stuff like "with that sort of money you could've bought an m3 or a decent car like a x5" etc. If the GTR would demolish the nearest competitor than I shall think it would be a very short explanation.

    Truth is willy waving matters, and it doesn't matter if it's an iPhone or Rollex

    Edit: I dont own a GTR, just nearly all my cars have came from Japan.

  • Guvernator 27 Feb 2013

    GTR Owner said:
    Fair question. When I told people I was getting a Nissan GTR I had to put up with a fair bit of stick for obvious reasons. What made me buy my second one was I was totally sold on the car. I have used it at several track days in UK and at Nurburgring and I really love it. However - if it was the same price as a say the Porsche (which is quite a bit more) would I have purchased my first one? If I'm honest no. Now I have been exposed to the GTR it would put me off far less. I guess what I am saying is the Nissan marque is still in relative terms the new boy on the super car block and it needs to keep making a name for itself. Perhaps I should modify my comment by saying to continue to attract "new buyers" it needs to keep price down and performance up. . . . but once you're bitten by it smile
    Have to agree, once you've experienced GTR ownership you get to see what all the fuss is about but for a vast majority of people, it's very difficult to get over that Nissan badge and it's just seen as a chavved up ricer car so despite how good it is, the brand won't support a 6 figure price tag.

    Rightly or wrongly the Nissan badge just doesn't have the same badge kudos as a Porsche so they need to price it to try to entice buyers who might not consider one otherwise. Trying to appeal to a hardcore set of GTR fans who are already converts is not enough, it needs to win people who aren't traditionally fans, over too.

  • GTR Owner 26 Feb 2013

    Olivera said:
    GTR Owner said:
    I got to say I agree. The overall performance has to be either significantly greater for similar cost or the price has to be kept down.
    I'm curious - why do you believe that to be the case?
    Fair question. When I told people I was getting a Nissan GTR I had to put up with a fair bit of stick for obvious reasons. What made me buy my second one was I was totally sold on the car. I have used it at several track days in UK and at Nurburgring and I really love it. However - if it was the same price as a say the Porsche (which is quite a bit more) would I have purchased my first one? If I'm honest no. Now I have been exposed to the GTR it would put me off far less. I guess what I am saying is the Nissan marque is still in relative terms the new boy on the super car block and it needs to keep making a name for itself. Perhaps I should modify my comment by saying to continue to attract "new buyers" it needs to keep price down and performance up. . . . but once you're bitten by it smile

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