Ferrari 430 Scuderia: Spotted


It has been coming for some time, but I think I can now say with some certainty that the sports cars of the 90s and noughties will in future be viewed in one of two ways: paddles or no paddles. Paddles in this case means actuated manual shifters, not dual-clutch systems.

Pared back look lets you focus on what's good
Pared back look lets you focus on what's good
And according to this categorization, no paddles will be good news, paddles will be bad news.

My aversion to these early attempts at clutch-and-leverless transmissions is probably a touch extreme because I'm a flat-earther who likes to defend real driving. But let's face it, they are mostly rubbish.

So where does that leave the Ferrari 430 Scuderia?

Its hydraulically operated manual 'box should leave it festering in the 'paddles' corner, but I find myself inexplicably drawn to the Scud - always have done, despite the lack of a stick. I thank my lucky stars I found a 512 in time, because after a quick drive in one a few months back I was dangerously close to taking another hit of heroin. I mean finance.

How does it avoid categorisation as a paddle-spudder? For one the transmission somehow works. It's fast, smooth and far better than any of the type that I've tried. It also fits with the ergonomics of the car itself. I know this sounds odd, but when you sit in a Scuderia the relationship between seat and wheel kind of precludes reaching to your left (or right) for a large metal lever.

Stealth spec (relatively) is Harris's choice
Stealth spec (relatively) is Harris's choice
It's also a fantastically aggressive and interactive car - not as fast or technically gifted as a 458 but much more willing to absorb the driver into the process. When you're pushing hard it chews through gears so fast that even a committed stick man has to question whether a manual gearbox would adversely tamper with that addictive brutality.

Put that way, I suppose it's one of the few cars whose paddles actually work with the experience rather than contaminate it. And that's before we celebrate the stunning looks, the gorgeous dual tail-pipes, the bare cabin and the fact that it's a great car on road and track.

Ferrari made a few too many for the Scud to become the next 288 GTO, but this is one Ferrari of the 'modern' era I think will not suffer for having paddles.

At this point I should probably link to a car for sale. I like grey ones. So here's a grey one.


FERRARI 430 SCUDERIA
Engine:
4,309cc V8
Transmission: 6-speed automated manual
Power (hp): 510@8,500rpm
Torque (lb ft): 346@5,250rpm
MPG: 17.9mpg (NEDC combined)
CO2: 360g/km
First registered: 2010
Recorded mileage: 11,724
Price new: £172,500
Yours for: £136,950

See the original advert here.

 

   
   

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Comments (80) Join the discussion on the forum

  • Dblue 08 Aug 2013

    I did enjoy Wilton, its a great day out. smile

    The only real bugbear I have with Ferraris is the pitiful lack of use the cars get in the UK.

    I had my Scud for 14 mths and it covered 8500 miles despite not emerging from the Garage between mid October and the start of March. 1 Alps trip, 1 Le Mans trip and actually using it in between. I did love it as an experience but if you use them they don't command the great residuals they appear to.

    Too many other cars on the market with tiny mileages.

  • Russell996 08 Aug 2013

    Dblue said:
    Well I suspect that they have made substantial reductions in light of increased competitiveness and falling demand. Fact is that an equivalent Porsche RS needs servicing every 2 years and a bog standard annual will be half that.

    Yes, they are perfectly usable for everyday trips, of course they are but the number of cars that exceed 5000 miles pa is tiny. It seems to me ridiculous that a car that costs 100s of thousands of pounds to buy should be praised to the hilt because it successfully covers a couple of 1000 miles a year without a problem.
    Prices haven't changed to my knowledge, my 430 coupe servicing was priced similarly 5 years ago. Fact is that Porsche is always going to be cheaper, far higher volume and more servicing competition.
    Prices per service for the RS models aren't actually too dissimilar although as you say every 2 years is a big difference.



    I'm not sure I understand the issue you are trying to highlight, you can legitimately ask why owners only drive a 1000 miles a year, but the car will do 10's of 1000's with no problems, indeed in Europe many Ferrari's are used properly.

    PS, did you enjoy Wilton?

  • Dblue 08 Aug 2013

    Russell996 said:
    Dblue said:
    The car was epic in most ways, engine. performance, transmission, sound but my abiding impression after owning mine was that it's fundametal build quality left quite a lot to be desired. It didn't break down at all though or have more than 1 or 2 odd electrical glitches.

    Annual Service at HR Owen was £2,300. I wanted it to go there for it's history and I certainly could have twisted their arms a bit but that's what they charged.
    I could have got Carrs to do it for £1250 at the time I think.
    If the £839 you got charged was from a franchised dealer then either you have a cheaper car to service or they have substantially reduced their prices.
    I can't really comment on why you were charged so much or the problems you experienced except to confirm early Scuds suffer milky carbon as does the CS. Price I quoted was for my 16M which has now had 2 annuals and one major service, all competitively priced. Looking at HR Owens web site they seem to have very similar prices.

    http://www.hrowen.co.uk/ferrari/service-parts-body...
    Well I suspect that they have made substantial reductions in light of increased competitiveness and falling demand. Fact is that an equivalent Porsche RS needs servicing every 2 years and a bog standard annual will be half that.

    Yes, they are perfectly usable for everyday trips, of course they are but the number of cars that exceed 5000 miles pa is tiny. It seems to me ridiculous that a car that costs 100s of thousands of pounds to buy should be praised to the hilt because it successfully covers a couple of 1000 miles a year without a problem.





  • Russell996 08 Aug 2013

    Dblue said:
    The car was epic in most ways, engine. performance, transmission, sound but my abiding impression after owning mine was that it's fundametal build quality left quite a lot to be desired. It didn't break down at all though or have more than 1 or 2 odd electrical glitches.

    Annual Service at HR Owen was £2,300. I wanted it to go there for it's history and I certainly could have twisted their arms a bit but that's what they charged.
    I could have got Carrs to do it for £1250 at the time I think.
    If the £839 you got charged was from a franchised dealer then either you have a cheaper car to service or they have substantially reduced their prices.
    I can't really comment on why you were charged so much or the problems you experienced except to confirm early Scuds suffer milky carbon as does the CS. Price I quoted was for my 16M which has now had 2 annuals and one major service, all competitively priced. Looking at HR Owens web site they seem to have very similar prices.

    http://www.hrowen.co.uk/ferrari/service-parts-body...

  • Dblue 08 Aug 2013

    Porkie said:
    toppstuff said:
    The number of people actually putting proper miles on a modern Ferrari is depressingly low. And when they do, running costs seem to be more like a boat or a small helicopter.


    Edited by toppstuff on Tuesday 6th August 12:46
    not in my experience... I've done 15k in my 430 and its been faultless and servicing is NOT expensive at all. Done trackdays, done road trips, pops to shops etc. Totally usable everyday.

    My friends had a grey scud for a year now and its also been faultless and cost nothing to look after. He has done lots of Brands evenings in it and 3 Spa trips with me.



    So the Scuderia had no suspension drop link issues, no milky carbon fibre, no corrosion at the wheel arches or seam of the front lid , no dropped wiper mechanism causing a scratch on the screen and requiring a new windscreen??

    If so then good for him but that's the list mine had between 5 and 14k miles (Still under warranty of course)

    The car was epic in most ways, engine. performance, transmission, sound but my abiding impression after owning mine was that it's fundametal build quality left quite a lot to be desired. It didn't break down at all though or have more than 1 or 2 odd electrical glitches.

    Annual Service at HR Owen was £2,300. I wanted it to go there for it's history and I certainly could have twisted their arms a bit but that's what they charged.
    I could have got Carrs to do it for £1250 at the time I think.
    If the £839 you got charged was from a franchised dealer then either you have a cheaper car to service or they have substantially reduced their prices.

    I couldn't source replacement Ferrari specific rear tyres for the car at any independent outlet. Pirelli could supply a right hand Corsa for a reasonable £365+VAT but the only way I could replace the (illegal) left hand tyre was through Graypaul and it cost £515+VAT for 1 TYRE!!!.







    Edited by Porkie on Thursday 8th August 13:18

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