Pic Of The Week: Pagani Huayra

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'It sounds like someone vomiting'. 'It sounds like a cough'. 'It sounds like a football chant'. 'It's almost unpronounceable'.

These seem to be the most common phrases surrounding the new Pagani Huayra supercar, be it on our very own forums or in articles written out there in the 'real world'.

Which is a bit of a shame, really, because an all-new supercar from one of the world's most flamboyant manufacturers is not a regular occurrence. So when it does happen, we as car enthusiasts should surely be debating the merits of - or drooling over - the body, specification sheet and oily bits of the new machine.

Thus, on the very day the new Pagani is presented to the public in Milan, we are attempting to redress the balance of Huayra discussion (it's pronounced 'why-rer' by the way, at least according to our man in the know, Dan Trent who's had a good poke around the new Huayra) with what we reckon is a dribble-worthy POTW of the new car's innards. And very lovely they look too...

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Comments (30) Join the discussion on the forum

  • SteveHall30 23 Mar 2012

    So this is from last year or so, but had to say.
    Am I wrong, or did they put a left handed assymetric tyre on the right wheel?

  • Mr Whippy 22 Feb 2011

    ArosaMike said:
    Whilst the Pagani's wishbones may well work, they may have had to sacrifice compliancy in the suspension to do so. I'm happy for someone with more experience than me to explain why the wishbone design is fine, but it may be possible for them to produce a better car with better design!
    The design maybe looks at wheel control and desireable kinematics for such a powerful rwd road car, more than it is for weight/packaging which Pagani can control in other ways anyway.

    Formula race cars NEED to be light no matter what, budgets are small, and exotic materials elsewhere might be off the list.
    Cheap replacements are needed, so cheap manufacturing processes are needed, as racing will see them damaged.
    Racing also means rapid adjustment of alignment too if needed.


    I'm fairly certain they have done it the way they have for a reason. As said, it's a GT road car and a friendly limit kinematic setup probably came above those extra grammes of weight?!

    Dave

  • bobberz 21 Feb 2011

    There's something inherently geeky about these sorts of pictures, but I love it! To me, sometimes the engineering underneath a supercar is more beautiful than the car itself. That's definitely the case here: I wasn't a fan of the Huayra when I first saw it, but now I kinda like it! Same with the Aston One-77.

    My new desktop.

    As to the name, I think I've figured it out: it's what US soldiers shout, "HOOH-RAH!!!"

  • dinkel 21 Feb 2011


  • ArosaMike 20 Feb 2011

    There is a difference between getting it to work and it being correct 'proper' engineering. There are a lot of cars around where the geometry/mechanical design is wrong, but because of development they've managed to largely correct the issues it may cause. You may well ask then why it matters, and to the general public, it doesn't. However, poor initial design usually leads to unnecessarily heavy components.

    A classic example is rod ends in bending (http://www.formulastudent.de/de/academy/pats-corner/advice-details/article/pats-column-rod-ends-in-bending/ for more info). It's a fundamentally poor design, but with testing, failures can be avoided. The only issue is, you end up with a wishbone assembly that's twice the weight it needs to be. My Caterham for example has an M14 rod end on the upper wishbone. A Formula 1 car has an M6 bolt that does the same job, and yet it sees 5 times the load my Caterham does. The reason....correct engineering design!

    Whilst the Pagani's wishbones may well work, they may have had to sacrifice compliancy in the suspension to do so. I'm happy for someone with more experience than me to explain why the wishbone design is fine, but it may be possible for them to produce a better car with better design!

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