Show us your Mustangs!

Show us your Mustangs!

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Discussion

kwarden2004

19 posts

121 months

Saturday 3rd October 2020
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At the Skyfall location in Glen Etive/Glencoe on our summer staycation.

V8 Stang

4,132 posts

147 months

Sunday 4th October 2020
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Photo'd by this nice chap smilehttps://mattgreenwell.co.uk


Edited by V8 Stang on Sunday 4th October 19:15

J4CKO

33,404 posts

164 months

Wednesday 18th November 2020
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TREMAiNE said:
Owned since 15/10/19

18 plate, bought with just 1085 miles so about as near as brand new as I'm ever going to get!

A very different car to the Boxster S it replaced but I am loving it so far. It looks incredible and the interior is a surprisingly nice place to sit... Oh, and that engine cloud9

Hi, this is interesting as I currently have a BMW M135i and am saving for a change, two top candidates are a Cayman/Boxster S (987 flavour) or a Mustang GT, about a 2018, manual, preferably Grabber Blue like yours.

I am leaning more towards a Mustang as would be newer and will probably not need much fettling, do you miss anything about the Porsche ? does the Mustang still feel like a proper drivers car after a Boxster, or a bit of a clumsy lump in comparison ? Do you get as much out of the Ford, is it as enjoyable but for different reasons or is it still a drivers car ? Watched the Jayemm video and he seemed a bit nonplussed.


TREMAiNE

3,214 posts

113 months

Wednesday 18th November 2020
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J4CKO said:
TREMAiNE said:
Owned since 15/10/19

18 plate, bought with just 1085 miles so about as near as brand new as I'm ever going to get!

A very different car to the Boxster S it replaced but I am loving it so far. It looks incredible and the interior is a surprisingly nice place to sit... Oh, and that engine cloud9

Hi, this is interesting as I currently have a BMW M135i and am saving for a change, two top candidates are a Cayman/Boxster S (987 flavour) or a Mustang GT, about a 2018, manual, preferably Grabber Blue like yours.

I am leaning more towards a Mustang as would be newer and will probably not need much fettling, do you miss anything about the Porsche ? does the Mustang still feel like a proper drivers car after a Boxster, or a bit of a clumsy lump in comparison ? Do you get as much out of the Ford, is it as enjoyable but for different reasons or is it still a drivers car ? Watched the Jayemm video and he seemed a bit nonplussed.

It’s a difficult question to answer.

The Boxster that the Mustang replaced was a 987.2 S with PDK and Sports Chrono.
It was a truly wonderful car which I ran for around 3.5 years. Even with a modest 310bhp, I do feel it was too powerful to really have fun on public roads regularly in the area I live in and on the roads that I typically drive on. There were times where you could, but most of the time I drove it normally, with the odd squirt on a slip road.

When it came to replacing it, I looked at an array of sports cars around 35-45k, and aside from an Exige S3 which would have been too compromised, nothing in that price bracket seemed like it would be worth the cost to upgrade.
To be honest, looking at sports cars at around 60k didn’t even seem to be worth the upgrade – including 981s and 714s and it’s because of this that I decided to get something completely different.
For what it’s worth, my dad recently bought a nearly new 992 Carrera which I’ve driven a few times, and aside from the much newer/nicer interior, it didn’t feel worth the near-100k price difference to my old Boxster S. And in all honesty, the electric steering wasn’t anywhere near as nice.

I don’t regret selling it – though I do regret never tracking it as I never really got to experience it on the limit, it was just too good.

I do around 20 motorway miles each way for work each day, and these days that’s about the only driving actually do which did make the Porsche a little boring sometimes, and whilst the interior is ok, it isn’t overly special and really does feel dated.

For the driving I do, the Mustang is a very nice place to sit and for commuting, I much prefer it to the Porsche. The interior, whilst a little plasticky in places, does feel unique and special in its design and layout. Features like Android Auto/Apple Car Play are a game-changer for me and it is (obviously) a little softer than the Porsche and more comfortable on the motorway.

When driving normally at 30mph or so, neither car is overly exciting but the Mustang definitely feels way more special and I enjoy being in it so much more than the Porsche at those speeds.
My only real criticism is you really do notice the weight of the clutch in traffic. It’s not so bad at the lights, but when it’s constant clutch work when you’re crawling in traffic it does make my leg very tired, and on those rare occasions I do miss the PDK ‘box in the 987.2.

When it comes to driver engagement, naturally, the Boxster is leagues above the Mustang. The steering feel is some of the best I’ve felt, the sharp turning and masses of grip when planting the throttle as you exit a bend was exhilarating.
It sounded beautiful when you opened it up, the power delivery was linear and felt exceedingly quick – partly due to the excellent gearbox and experiencing it all with the roof down really was special.

The Mustang doesn’t quite meet the highs but it isn’t bad by any stretch of the imagination.
It is nowhere near as cumbersome as I expected, nor is the engine as wafty and lazy. Whilst the electric steering offers virtually no feedback at all, the turn in really is rather sharp and direct – it grips well, and as for the Coyote engine… It really is the party piece of the car. I can’t believe how nice it is to work and rev – I really did expect it to be lethargic, with all the power being at the bottom of the rev range but you really can rev it out and have fun with it – it’s a welcomed surprise. The gearbox is another surprise – it feels great. It’s a delight to shift, with a really weighty and mechanical feel – the gearing is fairly short and aggressive too and on the right road can feel more fun than the Boxster – albeit nowhere near as precise.
The pedals are not set up well for heel and toe – it’s a bit fiddly.
Also, the P-Zeroes they come with are terrible, with the back always kicking out in the wet – even in higher gears if you just plant it.

In the Boxster, on the roads I tended to drive on, I often felt like I was being driven – it was composed, stable, surefooted but animalistic when opened up. When you press on in the Mustang, you do feel the weight but with the back end kicking out and the V8 snarling it’s no less fun despite it being less competent. It is worth noting that the size of the Mustang definitely puts me off pushing it on tighter roads. It’s not excessively big compared to other cars on the road, but obviously it is much larger than the Porsche.

Aesthetically, the Mustang looks excellent, the Porsche looks okay. The Mustang does get a lot of looks and people trying to race which can be a pain but equally, it does add to that special feeling.

Overall, to me, the Mustang is the better car relative to what I want in a car this moment in time – something moderately fast, comfortable and well equipped. If I specifically wanted more of a sports car and spent more time on B roads and less time on motorways, I’d still be sitting in the Boxster, however.

Obviously, running costs are a factor.
I genuinely get better MPG out of the Mustang, having averaged 25.2mpg over the last 8.5k. I averaged around 23mpg in the Boxster S.
VED is £145 in the Mustang vs. nearly £300 in the Porsche and this year's Mustang service from my local Ford Dealership was £255 whereas my final Boxster service at my local Porsche dealer (which was a major service) was nearly £1000 (I think) – but it is worth noting the Boxster servicing is 2 year/24k miles so they’re actually fairly reasonable costs.

Obviously, the newest 987s are still approaching 10 years old, vs a 2-3 year old Mustang for the same cost, so the Mustang will likely be the cheaper option over the next few years depending on how the values fluctuate.
Unless you’re after an outright sports car, I couldn’t choose the Boxster of the Mustang. If you’re buying a weekend car, I probably wouldn’t choose either as in my opinion, whilst I love both of them, neither are special enough to warrant such minor use.

Quite a few people seemed underwhelmed by it – and I do understand their reasons – it really does depend on what you expect from the car, how you drive it, where you drive it etc. It does need a louder exhaust from standard though.

A full write up I did for mine is here:
https://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&...

I probably put way too long an answer than you were looking for but too much info is better than too little.

eldar

16,137 posts

160 months

Wednesday 18th November 2020
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I was one of the underwhelmed ones. Nothing concrete wrong, just felt less than the sum of the parts. A bit of a marmite car, it seems.

I'd suggest a long test drive before committing, it does a lot very well.

J4CKO

33,404 posts

164 months

Wednesday 18th November 2020
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Many thanks for the detailed reply, much appreciated and conveys your actual expressions that match up very accurately with the impressions I have gleaned from all my reading and watching.

Will read your other wrote up and digest when I have more time.

The Mustang does seem to be the favourite at the moment, I think its a car that everyone loves and it doesnt seem to generate negative reactions, not that the Porsche does but the Mustang just seems to be a bit of a folk hero in comparison.

A gre convertible went past when I was walking the dog the other night, late ish, roof down at night and a pretty loud exhaust, it sounded utterly magnificent.

TREMAiNE

3,214 posts

113 months

Wednesday 18th November 2020
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eldar said:
I was one of the underwhelmed ones. Nothing concrete wrong, just felt less than the sum of the parts. A bit of a marmite car, it seems.

I'd suggest a long test drive before committing, it does a lot very well.
I think that to some degree, age may be a factor as to why people can be underwhelmed by it.
I am fairly young - 28 and I don't really have the means to run multiple cars at the moment so I for me, a 'do it all in one' car with reasonable running costs, reliability, whilst having a biggish engine, looks etc.

There really isn't much out there - and really, at 35k new for the V8 (originally) there really aren't any direct rivals at all.
For me, the only cars I can compare the Mustang to are cars that are either a different class or a vastly different price bracket.

I would imagine people in their 40s, 50s and 60s have likely owned an array of older cars (which would have been new at the time) that were, on paper, similar to the Mustang - manual, RWD, V8 coupes. Think how many of those there used to be.

Few would deny that the electric steering, extra weight and other additions to new cars have damped the driving experience, so I'd probably argue that a lot of people who've owned plenty of interesting metal over the years are underwhelmed by the Mustang because whilst it is similar on paper to what they've owned in the past it also has all the negatives of modern motoring thrown in too.

I know it's not a fair comparison, but I'm sure people who owned Chimaera's and Griffiths in the 90s would be a little underwhelmed by the Mustang and I'm sure if I were to ever drive a Chim, I'd find it leagues above in many ways.


That's my take at least.


J4CKO

33,404 posts

164 months

Wednesday 18th November 2020
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TREMAiNE said:
eldar said:
I was one of the underwhelmed ones. Nothing concrete wrong, just felt less than the sum of the parts. A bit of a marmite car, it seems.

I'd suggest a long test drive before committing, it does a lot very well.
I think that to some degree, age may be a factor as to why people can be underwhelmed by it.
I am fairly young - 28 and I don't really have the means to run multiple cars at the moment so I for me, a 'do it all in one' car with reasonable running costs, reliability, whilst having a biggish engine, looks etc.

There really isn't much out there - and really, at 35k new for the V8 (originally) there really aren't any direct rivals at all.
For me, the only cars I can compare the Mustang to are cars that are either a different class or a vastly different price bracket.

I would imagine people in their 40s, 50s and 60s have likely owned an array of older cars (which would have been new at the time) that were, on paper, similar to the Mustang - manual, RWD, V8 coupes. Think how many of those there used to be.

Few would deny that the electric steering, extra weight and other additions to new cars have damped the driving experience, so I'd probably argue that a lot of people who've owned plenty of interesting metal over the years are underwhelmed by the Mustang because whilst it is similar on paper to what they've owned in the past it also has all the negatives of modern motoring thrown in too.

I know it's not a fair comparison, but I'm sure people who owned Chimaera's and Griffiths in the 90s would be a little underwhelmed by the Mustang and I'm sure if I were to ever drive a Chim, I'd find it leagues above in many ways.


That's my take at least.
Hmm, I was fifty recently, been trying to indulge my car passion but have three kids and an old house that needs constant work, so its been a challenge, but for the first time am managing to put money away to put towards a car, the M135i was the result of a redundancy and a bit put to.

So have had a few nice cars but nothing super expensive (in the scheme of things) beyond the M135i at 21k which has been good but a little underwhelming as a drivers car, but that in part is down to me getting an auto.

I enjoyed a ropey 225 TT despite it always being broken, but I think that was it feeling a bit special to sit in, nice manual box and the rest was alright.

I think a Mustang with a manual box and a shouty exhaust may do the trick, but its a big commitment, need to drive one.

Got a bit more saving up to do before I can go looking really as don't want the earliest 2015/2016, prefer a more recent one with really low miles and like you say there is nothing comparable, everything tends to be auto, its a unique proposition really but will it hit the spot that the BMW hasnt.

BMW has a lovely engine wrapped in a fairly average hatchback, dont mind the looks but not exactly distinctive, where a bright blue Mustang is, drove the earlier model in the states and loved that, front did feel pointy even if the back end was a bit hoppity/skipitty.

Will get this current lockdown out of the way and go to the Ford place local, about a mile away and ask for a shot in one.

Have considered all sorts, but keep coming back to Mustangs, helps that the wife loves them as well, though she objects to me getting one and not her, which will never happen anyway, so I may as well get one and she can have a go in it, not paying her petrol and tax bills on a 5.0 !


Legacywr

8,994 posts

152 months

Wednesday 18th November 2020
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I’ve put a deposit on a manual Mustang, not driven one yet though...

TREMAiNE

3,214 posts

113 months

Wednesday 18th November 2020
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J4CKO said:
Hmm, I was fifty recently, been trying to indulge my car passion but have three kids and an old house that needs constant work, so its been a challenge, but for the first time am managing to put money away to put towards a car, the M135i was the result of a redundancy and a bit put to.

So have had a few nice cars but nothing super expensive (in the scheme of things) beyond the M135i at 21k which has been good but a little underwhelming as a drivers car, but that in part is down to me getting an auto.

I think a Mustang with a manual box and a shouty exhaust may do the trick, but its a big commitment, need to drive one.
I actually originally saved up for and set out to buy an F10 M5 funnily enough, but just felt that despite being extremely good it was just a bit dull and boring for me which is what turned me toward the Mustang, despite originally ruling it out for being American, with poor build quality and rubbish handling (despite at that time never having driven one or even sat in one).
Whilst it is a big commitment, relative to Ms, AMGs, RSs etc, The Mustang is probably a safer option when you're buying something with that level of performance. It'll certainly cost you considerably less long term; and current values of the earlier 2015/2016 cars is still pretty strong so it wouldn't be unrealistic to say that it might not depreciate all that much given that it's effectively the last (or one of the last) manual V8 sports car for sale in Europe - may even rise in price given enough time...

Definitely give a few a proper test drive. Hopefully you like it!

Good luck.

cerb4.5lee

18,445 posts

144 months

Wednesday 18th November 2020
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I've really enjoyed reading the experiences/opinions on this page. The Mustang is the only car that I think I'd be happy to swap my 370Z for. I've always wanted one(I'm 47) and I really like how different they are(in the UK) and the history of them.

They have pretty much all of the ingredients that I look for in a car, and I think the only things that I could hold against them is their size and weight. Everything else about them I absolutely love.

David Beer

3,635 posts

231 months

Wednesday 18th November 2020
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Had a griff 500 which stayed standard, no problems. Second 500 at 20,000 miles thought a bit more power, disaster. Then went safe SLK amg which I leased for two years, never washed it by hand !
Having done many thousands of miles in a mustang gt in the USA, got a convertible auto.
I can not think of any reason that would redirect me to a griff.

J4CKO

33,404 posts

164 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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TREMAiNE said:
J4CKO said:
Hmm, I was fifty recently, been trying to indulge my car passion but have three kids and an old house that needs constant work, so its been a challenge, but for the first time am managing to put money away to put towards a car, the M135i was the result of a redundancy and a bit put to.

So have had a few nice cars but nothing super expensive (in the scheme of things) beyond the M135i at 21k which has been good but a little underwhelming as a drivers car, but that in part is down to me getting an auto.

I think a Mustang with a manual box and a shouty exhaust may do the trick, but its a big commitment, need to drive one.
I actually originally saved up for and set out to buy an F10 M5 funnily enough, but just felt that despite being extremely good it was just a bit dull and boring for me which is what turned me toward the Mustang, despite originally ruling it out for being American, with poor build quality and rubbish handling (despite at that time never having driven one or even sat in one).
Whilst it is a big commitment, relative to Ms, AMGs, RSs etc, The Mustang is probably a safer option when you're buying something with that level of performance. It'll certainly cost you considerably less long term; and current values of the earlier 2015/2016 cars is still pretty strong so it wouldn't be unrealistic to say that it might not depreciate all that much given that it's effectively the last (or one of the last) manual V8 sports car for sale in Europe - may even rise in price given enough time...

Definitely give a few a proper test drive. Hopefully you like it!

Good luck.
Its definitely the front runner at the moment, I think my main issue with the BMW is the auto box, utterly brilliant as it is as an auto, its just not a manual and I miss that element of control and dont need the ease an auto brings for the drudge of commuting as not really commuting. I think BWs can be a bit too good and Mustangs used to be desirable but not much cop, but the S550 gets compared favorably to M4's and stuff so its not that far off dynamically it seems, enough anyway not to have to make massive excuses or compromises.

It looks great, still very much a Mustang but you sit ont he correct side for the UK and though its very clearly an American icon, it doesnt shout it too loudly (metaphorically) where a lot of American cars can indicate you arent averse to wearing a Stetson and listen to country and western of your own free will, its got enough "YeeHaw"(TM) but not too much.

They are a bit of a big thing, but I will manage and can borrow the wifes Fiesta if I need a smaller car. Bonus is that its a lot newer than other options and generally simpler having no turbos so hopefully more reliable, M5's are massively faster but I am not sure I need to go that fast and can do without the engine issues anything I could afford would be subject to, I know Mustangs can have an issue with the oil cooler so arent completely immune but no turbos to go smoky or other BMW issues.

I bought a 350Z about seven years ago for 7 grand, it never missed a beat and I kept it around 2 years, put a new Cobra exhaust on £400 or so, new Stereo which cost me £200 and a day of messing about fitting it, oh and some brake pads (£30) then sold it for seven grand. I would be thinking a Mustang is a similar reliability bet and it wont match zero depreciation but like you say, shouldn't plummet.

Will try and get one with the lower VED, but no that bother, fuel wise cant see it being much worse than my BMW which is currently saying 19 point something, it does short journeys, gets used as intended and my eldest has been using it quite a bit smile

Got 16 or so in mine I reckon, will have nine grand to put to before the end of the year, then just save up a bit more or borrow the difference, will get this lockdown period out of the way and aim to look into the new year.

Do I put more to and get the facelift ? then there is spec, ill be a manual coupe GT, colour wise I like Grabber Blue, the other ones dont seem to grab me on a Mustang despite being a nice colours, depends on the years, Bullitt would be nice but 40 grand is probably too much of a stretch.

Would probably fiddle with it as well, part of the appeal, the Shadow edition wheels are ok ish, but most come on some really uninspiring ones, definitely an exhaust, preferably switchable, doesnt the facelift have that anyway ?

Sorry, waffling now biggrin







phil1967

269 posts

156 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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robrobc

192 posts

156 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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This is my 2019 Mustang.
Having hankered after one for quite a while it is great to finally scratch this itch.
Rob

TREMAiNE

3,214 posts

113 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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J4CKO said:
Do I put more to and get the facelift ? then there is spec, ill be a manual coupe GT, colour wise I like Grabber Blue, the other ones dont seem to grab me on a Mustang despite being a nice colours, depends on the years, Bullitt would be nice but 40 grand is probably too much of a stretch.

Would probably fiddle with it as well, part of the appeal, the Shadow edition wheels are ok ish, but most come on some really uninspiring ones, definitely an exhaust, preferably switchable, doesnt the facelift have that anyway ?
Grabber Blue was only offered for the 2017 Model Year, so you'll only see on the pre-facelift cars, from 66 plates up to 18 plates like mine.
The Shadow Edition wheels have grown on me, originally I hated them and wanted some standard GT wheels in black, however I've grown to like them and wouldn't change them. To my knowledge, there isn't a choice of wheels for GT's from the factory, it's the same design with a choice of colour with the exceptions being Shadow Editions and Bullits having exclusive wheels.

I really dislike the look of the facelift car, to me it's very droopy but it's undeniably the superior car - a lot more features, active exhaust, magneride, more power, digital dash etc.
It's more car for (obviously) more money but I actively chose to miss out on those features purely for the looks of the pre-facelift.
The quiet standard exhaust is easily sorted - I had my silencers removed for £280 and now it's glorious.

The pre-facelift cars also have more aggressive gearing than the facelifts - I'd recommend watching Engineering Explained's YouTube video on this as it could influence your decision.


Legacywr

8,994 posts

152 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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What are the main visual differences? I see that the location of the front indicators has changed, along with the small grills?

David Beer

3,635 posts

231 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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Legacywr said:
What are the main visual differences? I see that the location of the front indicators has changed, along with the small grills?
The bonnet is somewhat “flatter” and the exhaust are quad tips and of course different bumper to take the quad tips.
As mentioned before, if I could find an identical face lift to mine , I would. But my main interest is in the 10 speed auto, ok the dash is digital and it has sync 4 audio/ nav, neither would sway me.

croyde

17,854 posts

194 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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I bought my Mustang GT in 2016, well that's when it arrived, a year after ordering it.

It cost £34k with a couple of options. 2 years and 14000 miles later it sold for £30k. Such good value.

A quick look on Autotrader and 2016 models are still on for £25k.

I should have kept it. Love to be back in one. Don't know what you are missing until you lose it.

J4CKO

33,404 posts

164 months

Thursday 19th November 2020
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TREMAiNE said:
J4CKO said:
Do I put more to and get the facelift ? then there is spec, ill be a manual coupe GT, colour wise I like Grabber Blue, the other ones dont seem to grab me on a Mustang despite being a nice colours, depends on the years, Bullitt would be nice but 40 grand is probably too much of a stretch.

Would probably fiddle with it as well, part of the appeal, the Shadow edition wheels are ok ish, but most come on some really uninspiring ones, definitely an exhaust, preferably switchable, doesnt the facelift have that anyway ?
Grabber Blue was only offered for the 2017 Model Year, so you'll only see on the pre-facelift cars, from 66 plates up to 18 plates like mine.
The Shadow Edition wheels have grown on me, originally I hated them and wanted some standard GT wheels in black, however I've grown to like them and wouldn't change them. To my knowledge, there isn't a choice of wheels for GT's from the factory, it's the same design with a choice of colour with the exceptions being Shadow Editions and Bullits having exclusive wheels.

I really dislike the look of the facelift car, to me it's very droopy but it's undeniably the superior car - a lot more features, active exhaust, magneride, more power, digital dash etc.
It's more car for (obviously) more money but I actively chose to miss out on those features purely for the looks of the pre-facelift.
The quiet standard exhaust is easily sorted - I had my silencers removed for £280 and now it's glorious.

The pre-facelift cars also have more aggressive gearing than the facelifts - I'd recommend watching Engineering Explained's YouTube video on this as it could influence your decision.
Will watch that cheers, not bothered about the cosmetic differences, the extra power would be good, I like the idea of the active exhausts but £280 to make it a bit fruiter sounds fine as well. The digital dash appeals to my techy side but sort of prefer the look of the old dials.

croyde said:
I bought my Mustang GT in 2016, well that's when it arrived, a year after ordering it.

It cost £34k with a couple of options. 2 years and 14000 miles later it sold for £30k. Such good value.

A quick look on Autotrader and 2016 models are still on for £25k.

I should have kept it. Love to be back in one. Don't know what you are missing until you lose it.
Prices are a bit bizarre, seen 2016's at 26 to 28 grand, 2018s at 30, plus the 2018s have VED thats £400 a year cheaper, I know VED isn't a major concern when buying a 30 grand 5 litre car but thats well over a grand if you keep it three years so little benefit in paying 26/27, may as well get one two years newer for the extra.

I think the 2 year old ones at Ford dealers seem the best value, the older stuff seems to be with independent dealers who seem a bit ambitious price wise, cheapest not CAT is a 2015 with 55k on for £24,500, or a 2018 Shadow edition with 11k up for 30k.

An extra £5500 for 44k less miles, three years newer and the tax aspect seems pretty good value.