Should shock absorbers really be done in pairs?

Should shock absorbers really be done in pairs?

Author
Discussion

Wixzylol

Original Poster:

44 posts

37 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
Hi all,

Just had my FN2 Type R serviced and my private mechanic spotted n/s front shock had completely gone.

As part of this I've ordered the replacement part myself and will have it done next week.

Whilst Googling I've seen many say shocks should be done in pairs, when I asked my mechanic he said to only replace the one that's gone.

I trust my mechanic as he's looked at the car himself, I'm unsure of age of the other shock so his inspection and judgement is key.

Very interested to hear what people think should have been done here.


InitialDave

9,456 posts

89 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
I'd always replace in matched pairs.

Only time I wouldn't is if I know they're identical and the one I'm leaving is definitely in good condition, e.g. I replaced them recently before and then damaged one.

Having suspension behaviour differ slightly side to side isn't a great idea.

Wixzylol

Original Poster:

44 posts

37 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
It's being replaced with a like for like OEM part,

If the ride is noticeably worse I can always order another is what I was thinking

Mr Spoon

645 posts

8 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
You won't notice a difference but your geometry will.

Wixzylol

Original Poster:

44 posts

37 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
Getting new tyres after the shock is swapped so will this be a problem?

Wixzylol

Original Poster:

44 posts

37 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
Mr Spoon said:
You won't notice a difference but your geometry will.

SlimJim16v

3,757 posts

113 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
Yes

Tasmin200

1,108 posts

157 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
£500 stter...stick one on. Decent car? Buy a pair.

Tasmin200

1,108 posts

157 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
Mr Spoon said:
You won't notice a difference but your geometry will.
I'm intrigued, please explain.

Tony1963

3,428 posts

132 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
My private mechanic.


Lol. As opposed to one from a government run garage?

Sorry smile

Wixzylol

Original Poster:

44 posts

37 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
Tony1963 said:
My private mechanic.


Lol. As opposed to one from a government run garage?

Sorry smile
Meant more as opposed to a chain garage like Halfords haha

Tony1963

3,428 posts

132 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
smile

Mr Spoon

645 posts

8 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
Tasmin200 said:
I'm intrigued, please explain.
Use google

Cold

11,799 posts

60 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
They should be done in pairs, yes. The reason being is that the new one will have a far superior damping action than an old worn shock and this could result in an odd handling car.

Anecdote time, I replaced just the fronts on an old Range Rover once, stiffened up the nose quite nicely. But it meant the rear was a right old bouncy mess producing a weird pogoing motion. So doing just a corner would have been quite alarming. biggrin

Lincsls1

2,190 posts

110 months

Saturday 31st July
quotequote all
Tasmin200 said:
£500 stter...stick one on. Decent car? Buy a pair.
^^^ This.

I replaced just one front shock and spring on my daily shed (front offside). I considered doing the axle set, but decided that wasn't in the spirit of shedding!
Anyway, many months and miles later I can say I haven't noticed any ill handling effects and the tyres are still wearing nice and evenly. Its passed an MOT too.

stevieturbo

15,677 posts

217 months

Sunday 1st August
quotequote all
Wixzylol said:
It's being replaced with a like for like OEM part,

If the ride is noticeably worse I can always order another is what I was thinking
Like for like would imply it's a Honda part, with built in wear to match the other side.

Aftermarket parts may claim the same as OEM...they never are.

Whilst not essential to replace both, it is always best to replace both.

hyphen

23,085 posts

60 months

Sunday 1st August
quotequote all
Tasmin200 said:
£500 stter...stick one on. Decent car? Buy a pair.
Most people also think about how long they are keeping the car unfortunately.

Tony1963

3,428 posts

132 months

Sunday 1st August
quotequote all
It’s a bit like changing brake fluid. It should be changed every two years, but if I can carry out three emergency stops from highish speed and the fluid doesn’t boil, what’s the point?

Welshbeef

45,707 posts

168 months

Sunday 1st August
quotequote all
You have a performance car.
The remaining of the pair has done x thousand miles meaning you’ll have unmatched damping in the front.
Coming to sell it - more so as a performance car you’d have viewers question or think why has OP changed one but not the pair when the remaining one is old. What else has OP cut corners on?

steveo3002

8,762 posts

144 months

Sunday 1st August
quotequote all
its okay to replace one , but both will have done the same mileage /years old so a good chance the other wont be far behind it and fail soon