Classic car daily driver?

Author
Discussion

aeropilot

18,903 posts

174 months

Tuesday 15th October
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Puddles of Oil said:
My son has used his Sunbeam Alpine as a daily driver in the past covering up to 15,000 miles a year but remember to insure it correctly. Classic car insurance usually limits you to 5,000 miles and insists that you have another car as your daily driver.
^^^^This.....................

And is why I wouldn't use one as a daily, as you'll likely be risking its true value if anything untoward happens.


Faust66

1,574 posts

112 months

Tuesday 15th October
quotequote all
aeropilot said:
Puddles of Oil said:
My son has used his Sunbeam Alpine as a daily driver in the past covering up to 15,000 miles a year but remember to insure it correctly. Classic car insurance usually limits you to 5,000 miles and insists that you have another car as your daily driver.
^^^^This.....................

And is why I wouldn't use one as a daily, as you'll likely be risking its true value if anything untoward happens.
Lancaster are happy to insure my Amazon as my only car (named driver on my missus's car).

You don't build up no claims... but for circa 100 quid a year fully comp, who really cares?

grumpy52

4,056 posts

113 months

Wednesday 16th October
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I used an Austin Maestro VDP as a daily for about 6 months .
The main problem was all the rubber elbow connectors on the vacuum system falling apart , something that every car place in the world used to stock but these days are scarce, I bought all the stock that Southern Carbs had .
The gear linkage would pop off if you were enthusiastic with your gear changes , worn nylon ball bushes and hot oily conditions don't make for secure fixings .
I was doing daily round trips of 110 miles of mixed driving .

Peter3442

163 posts

15 months

Wednesday 16th October
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I used my Jaguar Mk2 as a daily driver back in the 1980s. Through ice, snow, rain and sunshine, it was always reliable. These days, I'd rather keep it for the sunny weather. Servicing is a bit of effort as it's best done frequently and there are a mass of grease nipples. I'd say the worst aspect for daily use (apart from fear of damage) is parking one without PAS. My routine used to be stop by the space, get out, take my coat/overcoat off, get back in and then maneuver the car. It's good exercise for the upper body muscles and more effective than the heater in keeping you warm.

A big point in favour of a Mk2 is that, apart from parking a non-PAS, they are comfortable in modern traffic and for many aspects fairly simple: two fuses and two relays.

lowdrag

9,929 posts

160 months

Wednesday 16th October
quotequote all
You want a daily commuter? Get a Volvo Amazon. I've never had one but their reputation goes before them. I've been in the Jaguar world for forty years and if you are thinking of a Mk 2 then think on the following; 123 electronic dizzy, power steering, LED bulbs, extra stop light under the rear bumper, uprated Zeus brakes, high-flow radiator with an uprated fan, overflow header tank, fuel injection if you wish, aircon?, and so on. These cars were about when I was knee high to a grasshopper, and traffic was negligible. It was not conceived for today. You'll need a high-torque starter, a high power battery, you'll need to change from positive to negative earth and add an alternator. Life ain't that simple friend.

Rollin

4,643 posts

192 months

Wednesday 16th October
quotequote all
My W123 Estate has been my daily driver for the last 6 months.



austin

1,018 posts

150 months

Thursday 17th October
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crankedup said:
^^^^
Was going to suggest a moggy! Great little car and very reliable for a vehicle of such age.
The only problem is watching them dissolve in front of your eyes! (Just swept up half a bucket of rust from the garage floor last night!)

Putting a decent heater in mine is also on the list.

Phil5343

105 posts

112 months

Thursday 17th October
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I use my Rover SD1 V8 SE every day, it's the only car I have that works. It's no problem if you make small allowances like it may take longer to demist in the morning etc. I sometimes take a more scenic route to ensure it's warmed up properly, otherwise the entire journey would be on choke.

All in all it's good fun, and makes a boring journey much better. It'd brighten my day up if I saw a Mk2 Jaguar on my commute, nevermind driving one myself!

hyphen

11,261 posts

37 months

Thursday 17th October
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I imagine you will see even more in London going foward then you already do, ULEZ exemption.

Shezbo

340 posts

77 months

Thursday 17th October
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Of course you can use a Classic on a daily bases!

Grandad had HB Viva's and Cortina's Mk2 and 3.

He was one of the original "rep's" in other words he did 20K + miles a year....I don't remember these cars breaking down too often and as I recall - the winters were much harder then - oh and he did not have a garage.......

uk66fastback

14,227 posts

218 months

Friday 18th October
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My 944 - G reg - is my daily driver and lives outside. But I work from home and so have no commute as such. But I'd still have it as a car to commute in if I had to. Thing is, it's so well built I'm not really sure it qualifies - it's just old, 30 years - but it seems to me like a modern car - goes superbly, decent heater, great suspension etc. I don't even think of it as a classic - it's just something I prefer to rive compared to the numerous huge white/silver blobs that all look like sci-fil film extras with no glass area that masquerade as cars.

HealeyV8

234 posts

25 months

Friday 18th October
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Phil5343 said:
I use my Rover SD1 V8 SE every day, it's the only car I have that works. It's no problem if you make small allowances like it may take longer to demist in the morning etc. I sometimes take a more scenic route to ensure it's warmed up properly, otherwise the entire journey would be on choke.

All in all it's good fun, and makes a boring journey much better. It'd brighten my day up if I saw a Mk2 Jaguar on my commute, nevermind driving one myself!
Is the choke required because of SU's or the weight of the car? I have an SD1 3.5 engine in my Jensen Healey but I have Edelbroke 500 and I start it without choke and then put a bit of manual choke to even it out, generally within less than 5 minutes I push the choke in.

warch

1,774 posts

101 months

Friday 18th October
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I used to use my petrol Series II Landie as a daily driver when my daily commute was 22miles. No problems really, I had one breakdown and that was due to faulty electronic ignition. Yes it was a bit cold in winter but you don't notice over such short distances, plus the roads were so slow anyway there was no real time difference compared to a car.

Get the car waxoyled if you venture out on salted roads though.

Phil5343

105 posts

112 months

Friday 18th October
quotequote all
HealeyV8 said:
Is the choke required because of SU's or the weight of the car? I have an SD1 3.5 engine in my Jensen Healey but I have Edelbroke 500 and I start it without choke and then put a bit of manual choke to even it out, generally within less than 5 minutes I push the choke in.
Possibly because of the SU's. I start it on full choke but almost immediately go to half and it seems happy. As it gets warmer I gradually lessen it, but it does like to be properly warm before its off altogether. Any less than half choke for the first few miles and it hesitates badly when pulling away. Hopefully I'll be changing to Efi soon, so that particular niggle should be a thing of the past.

kurt535

3,377 posts

64 months

Friday 18th October
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Merc 190e 2.6 becoming every other day car from next week.

daimlerv8

1,687 posts

27 months

Saturday 19th October
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A decent older car daily would be a BMW E28 or E30,EFI and electronic ignition and service when the dashboard computer tells you it needs it!

Rust are those car"s main downfall,but time has weeded out most rust buckets.

PositronicRay

16,813 posts

130 months

Saturday 19th October
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I use my 95 merc daily, it's nicer in the good weather. On. Horrible days I tend to take my wife's Hyandai. (which I hate to admit is worth about the same, but better in almost every respect)

kurt535

3,377 posts

64 months

Saturday 19th October
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Anglia Car Auctions have some decent fayre coming up. There looks to be a beautiful Merc 124 diesel estate I am trying hard not to go look at.......but oh its so, so old school cool and wholly practical too. you could bin your PCP monthly, buy the Merc and (rose tinted glasses on) live happily ever after!

Peter3442

163 posts

15 months

Saturday 19th October
quotequote all
lowdrag said:
You want a daily commuter? Get a Volvo Amazon. I've never had one but their reputation goes before them. I've been in the Jaguar world for forty years and if you are thinking of a Mk 2 then think on the following; 123 electronic dizzy, power steering, LED bulbs, extra stop light under the rear bumper, uprated Zeus brakes, high-flow radiator with an uprated fan, overflow header tank, fuel injection if you wish, aircon?, and so on. These cars were about when I was knee high to a grasshopper, and traffic was negligible. It was not conceived for today. You'll need a high-torque starter, a high power battery, you'll need to change from positive to negative earth and add an alternator. Life ain't that simple friend.
Lowdrag, don't all the comments that you've made on the Mk2 apply equally to the Amazon? The two are contemporaries in design and production. For non-PAS cars, the Amazon will be less heavy in steering due to the lighter engine, but it has correspondingly less performance due to the smaller engine.

Riley Blue

15,396 posts

173 months

Saturday 19th October
quotequote all
Peter3442 said:
lowdrag said:
You want a daily commuter? Get a Volvo Amazon. I've never had one but their reputation goes before them. I've been in the Jaguar world for forty years and if you are thinking of a Mk 2 then think on the following; 123 electronic dizzy, power steering, LED bulbs, extra stop light under the rear bumper, uprated Zeus brakes, high-flow radiator with an uprated fan, overflow header tank, fuel injection if you wish, aircon?, and so on. These cars were about when I was knee high to a grasshopper, and traffic was negligible. It was not conceived for today. You'll need a high-torque starter, a high power battery, you'll need to change from positive to negative earth and add an alternator. Life ain't that simple friend.
Lowdrag, don't all the comments that you've made on the Mk2 apply equally to the Amazon? The two are contemporaries in design and production. For non-PAS cars, the Amazon will be less heavy in steering due to the lighter engine, but it has correspondingly less performance due to the smaller engine.
OP mentions no traffic, A and B roads and 26 miles a day so surely no modifications should be necessary?