Hedgehog & Dogs

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CAPP0

Original Poster:

15,071 posts

147 months

Sunday 21st July
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Earlier in the week the dogs were getting very "hunty" in the garden so I went out to investigate and found a large-ish hedgehog. Our garden is fully fenced (for the dogs) but there are small gaps here & there underneath so I guess it came in through there.

We popped it back under the fence and put a couple of bricks by the gap, but tonight the dogs indicated something was up again and sure enough, there (s)he was....or something looking a lot like the last one.

We were all for putting it into a local field a few hundred yards away but then read on line that you shouldn't relocate a hog, it will have trouble finding water, possibly food, and of course it may have a nest nearby. They recommend training and/or muzzling your dog. The dogs aren't going to give up a few million years of hunting instinct, and I really cannot be muzzling them every time they need a pee in the evening.

So, what to do? I know a fox can take a hog, so whilst this one is good at balling itself up and going all prickly, I don't know that it would come off best if one of the dogs decided to have a go. The more hunty of the two has already tried pawing it.

Humane suggestions which don't put us or the dogs out please!

Brads67

1,645 posts

42 months

Sunday 21st July
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Relocating it far away is more humane than the dog killing it, and the dog WILL learn how to kill it. My Teckel is a dab hand so I have to be very careful about them and be quick in getting a grip of him.

Autopilot

985 posts

128 months

Monday 22nd July
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My Dobermann picks them up and tries to bring them in to the house. I know when he's found one as he keeps his head down and give me no eye contact and tries to sneak past so know he's hoping I don't notice.

Dogs eh!

CAPP0

Original Poster:

15,071 posts

147 months

Monday 22nd July
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Well, whilst I'm not about to be calling baby kestrels down from the garage roof, Hedgehog-gate has taken a novel twist this evening.

We had some compost bags piled up under a small bush/tree (I think it's some sort of acer - keen gardeners we are not!) and the route to the bags was blocked by a V8 engine and gearbox on a skate (well this IS PH biggrin). So I decided to move the engine and have a tidy up under the tree.

Picked up a couple of the bags, then another, and was confronted with this:



The observant will note that there are at least three separate sets of spines in the picture. Yes, we have hoglets. I've seen two, there may be another under mum.

To think that last week we put her under the fence and tried to keep her out (for her own good), and last night we were about to relocate her properly until I read not to on the internet.

Have spoken to a hedgehog rescue and asked advice, they reckon the hoglets are about 2 weeks old (not pink anymore, got spines, but still blind). It's not good to disturb a nest (albeit I didn't know it was there) and apparently can scare Mum off. However given the trials Mum has been through already, she probably won't abandon them now but may move them herself. So we're on hoglet watch, apparently if Mum goes and leaves them they will start crying out by tomorrow afternoon, and if that happens we'll pop them over to the rescue.

I've used a combination of garden furniture and boards to fence off the area from the dogs, minus a small gap for her to get in & out, and we'll monitor. Hopefully it will all play out OK. I'd really rather she moved house, just for her & the little 'uns sake. Whilst Mum is quite big and the dogs have been inquisitive but no more, if the hoglets start running around the lawn we'll have a whole new challenge on our hands.

hondafanatic

4,707 posts

145 months

Monday 22nd July
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Good for you for trying to make the best of it. I’d have done exactly the same.

I’ve had the odd hedgehog which our lab goes nuts at. I can get her in but the Frenchie just stands their barking (I say barking it’s more of a strangled croak) at it and I have to pick him up and march him inside.

We’ve recently had fun and games with foxes. First off it was an adult fox that found its way into our garden making the dogs go ballistic. This happened a few times but fox got away each time.

Then we had a fox cub, for whatever reason, sprint down the back garden towards the house, through the kitchen door, through the kitchen and into the lounge where we were all watching TV including the dogs. Jesus Christ it all kicked off. The fox cub was in the far corner of the lounge actually stting itself, the lab was going mental, the Frenchie made a bee-line for its neck, missus and two girls were screaming.

I had to open the hall door, pick the lab up and throw her out. Grab the Frenchie off the cub and throw him out. Pick the stting cub up, leg it outside and drop it down for it run off. Calm the females down. Let the dogs back in only for them to go mental despite the absence of a fox and bark at the still night and no doubt drawning from ‘tsks’ From the neighbours.

All in the space of about 30 seconds.

Anywho...good luck with the hedgehogs and I’m glad I finally got that off my chest hehe

kuro

1,100 posts

63 months

Wednesday 24th July
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Brads67 said:
Relocating it far away is more humane than the dog killing it, and the dog WILL learn how to kill it. My Teckel is a dab hand so I have to be very careful about them and be quick in getting a grip of him.
My family had a Jack Russell when I was growing up and she tore a few of them to shreds. Not sure if all dogs are prone to that level of aggressiveness, my Yorkie just growls and barks at them then backs off. Probably better to relocate it to be on the safe side.

CAPP0

Original Poster:

15,071 posts

147 months

Wednesday 24th July
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All kinda went wrong in the end. Us having completely unwittingly disturbed the nest, the mother hung around for about 18 hours, so we thought she was staying but then she shipped out leaving two very small hoglets squeaking and crying.

We knew of a wildlife rescue place, chap who rescues all sorts and has been for years so he agreed to take them on as he already had a few baby hogs there so he could nest and feed them all together. He's confident they'll pull through and he'll release them when they're ready.

Shame but on the other hand it would have been difficult to manage the dogs if small ones were tootling around the garden so in the end it may be the best outcome for them albeit via a somewhat rocky route.

Here they are shortly after we handed them over to him:


dnb

3,325 posts

186 months

Friday 26th July
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Autopilot said:
My Dobermann picks them up and tries to bring them in to the house. I know when he's found one as he keeps his head down and give me no eye contact and tries to sneak past so know he's hoping I don't notice.

Dogs eh!
At last. Another dog that does what my old springer used to do. They were just self propelled spiky tennis balls to him.

Greendubber

8,079 posts

147 months

Saturday 3rd August
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We have a rather unkept garden on the other side of one of our boundaries and have had hedgehogs coming into the garden and setting our dog off. I've managed to block up most of the entry points but there cunning buggers and keep coming back! I don't want to relocate them as they're obviously happy and have just as much right to be there.

Just been out to the wheelie bin in the front garden to pop some recycling in the bin and accidently booted one that was on the drive. It was curled up in a ball and was pretty heavy, it didn't move very far as I was wearing flip flops but bloody hell it hurt!

I like them but the bloody dog is going around the bend and now my foot hurts!