Car or Bike?

Author
Discussion

bilhound

Original Poster:

79 posts

21 months

Friday 17th March 2017
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Hi all,

I am new to posting but have been a reader for a while.

I received an IAM voucher for membership and the advanced driver/rider assessment as a gift (it was requested, no-one was trying to make comment on my driving!) and currently have both a car and a bike.

My history, needed transport quickly when aged ~20 so did CBT and then full Cat A licence at 21. Rode for 3 years (all seasons) and then decided it was about time to do the Cat B test. Sold bike, bought a car for winter and returned to biking once the spring had arrived. Unfortunately, was knocked off shortly afterwards and was out of action for around 4 months, due to injuries I couldn't 'manage' a bike so returned to 4 wheels for the next 4 years (medically, I could've returned sooner but couldn't afford to run two vehicles). As of April '16 I'm back on the bike again, with the car as well.

I do not know whether or not to use the voucher for the car or the bike? I do far more miles in the car, however I am more vulnerable on the bike (as has been proven) - but am also aware of the transferable skills so does it really matter which one I choose? Is it a case of flip a coin? Has anyone on PH chosen one over the other, and if so, why?

Thanks in advance.

huytonman

309 posts

129 months

Sunday 19th March 2017
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You are right that the skills that are taught will be pretty similar but there are differences, Ive done ROSPA training for both cars and bikes and if it was me I would think about survivability at the top of my list, especially after your biking break and sign up for the bike course. Whatever you learn there will be 100% applicable for the car but IMO not 100% transferable the other way around - subtle differences but enough to make a difference.
Keith

casbar

1,058 posts

150 months

Sunday 19th March 2017
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I did bike IAM and ROSPA but not car. Definitely transferable doing the bike training and tests has made me a better car driver as well.

bilhound

Original Poster:

79 posts

21 months

Tuesday 21st March 2017
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Thanks all, it does make sense to go for the self preservation aspect!

Will book into the Bike course. I'm in Bedfordshire, may see some of you in the future.

huytonman

309 posts

129 months

Tuesday 21st March 2017
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good move and I hope it goes well - best advice I can give you is to try your best to forget what you know and try to start with a clean slate, that way you will absorb much more than if you mentaly challenge things that proposed to you during the training. I was lucky enough to spend the weekend with North Wales police who were doing safer riding courses back in the late 90's early 2000's - best weekend of biking that I ever did and once I suspended my habits my riding improved to a new level.
Keith
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SVS

3,463 posts

206 months

Thursday 23rd March 2017
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huytonman said:
Ive done ROSPA training for both cars and bikes and if it was me I would think about survivability at the top of my list
+1 for the bike course. As well as survival skills, biking is more fun! biggrin

I agree with all of Keith's comments: this was also my experience in terms of similarities and differences, but most of the skills are transferable.

Before I did advanced bike stuff, I did a BikeSafe day thumbup as a basic intro. I found it was helpful to have done BikeSafe before IAM, plus it was good fun.

Enjoy your IAM course!

finishing touch

502 posts

102 months

Friday 24th March 2017
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I've never done a car one but I did do half a bike course.

Some of the things they did frightened me and I would never consider their methods when on the road myself.

Other advice and methods were good, and I use them to this day, bike or car. Following electric pole lines for instance.

Not sure if I'd want to do one now.

Paul G

SVS

3,463 posts

206 months

Friday 24th March 2017
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finishing touch said:
Some of the things they did frightened me
It's those funny handshakes that got me. Though I know some people don't like that ceremony with the goat.

bilhound

Original Poster:

79 posts

21 months

Wednesday 8th November 2017
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Update and conclusion

I went for the bike in the end - completed my advanced test at the end of October with a First Pass.

Very happy with the training, the observer is an absolute legend (dedicating his retirement to being a better rider/driver).

Cannot recommend it enough.

Now to see if the insurance discount offsets the SP30 I got in May....

Pica-Pica

3,815 posts

19 months

Wednesday 8th November 2017
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Well done. I would also have said go for the bike one. In fact, I believe everybody should ride a bike before driving a car.

Pica-Pica

3,815 posts

19 months

Wednesday 8th November 2017
quotequote all
finishing touch said:
I've never done a car one but I did do half a bike course.

Some of the things they did frightened me and I would never consider their methods when on the road myself.

Other advice and methods were good, and I use them to this day, bike or car. Following electric pole lines for instance.

Not sure if I'd want to do one now.

Paul G
I am not sure what was said about following electric pole lines. My experience is that they do not always follow the road, in the country they veer away across fields. Remember, their intention is to minimise cable length between houses, which may not always follow the road route.

andym1603

1,516 posts

107 months

Wednesday 8th November 2017
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finishing touch said:
I've never done a car one but I did do half a bike course.

Other advice and methods were good, Following electric pole lines for instance.

Paul G
Not sure if I would rely on that. Poles don't always follow the line of the road. Better off watching the line of the hedge row and using focal points for the corner sharpness.

finishing touch

502 posts

102 months

Thursday 9th November 2017
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andym1603 said:
finishing touch said:
I've never done a car one but I did do half a bike course.

Other advice and methods were good, Following electric pole lines for instance.

Paul G
Not sure if I would rely on that. Poles don't always follow the line of the road. Better off watching the line of the hedge row and using focal points for the corner sharpness.
In the bread bin of England Farmer Palmer needs as few obstacles in his fields as possible so he can manoeuvre his 20 metre wide combine harvester.
I believe that electricity line companies have to pay annual compensation to land owners for poles/pylons whereas the road verge is free, and easier for
maintenance.

For these reasons the poles, in the main, follow the roads.



In the interest of balance I should perhaps mention something I disagreed with.

Overtaking from a line of vehicles.

Lets say your the 3rd back with several behind you. (cars & bikes)
You think there's an opportunity to overtake so without increasing speed you signal, move over to the opposing lane, take another look, then if its still clear
accelerate and complete the overtake. If not clear and you change your mind then you signal, move back left into the space you had vacated.


Spot a problem?


IMHO either the following car/bike will follow you out expecting you to increase speed, and rear end you;
or, the following car/bike will move up so that you have no space to move back into.


Like I say, it's just my opinion, but "advanced" riding wasn't for me.

Paul G

waremark

2,458 posts

148 months

Friday 10th November 2017
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Sounds like advanced driving is exactly for you. Your sort of 'what-if' thinking is a central part of advanced.

AnotherGareth

209 posts

109 months

Friday 10th November 2017
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finishing touch said:
In the interest of balance I should perhaps mention something I disagreed with.

Overtaking from a line of vehicles.

Lets say your the 3rd back with several behind you. (cars & bikes)
You think there's an opportunity to overtake so without increasing speed you signal, move over to the opposing lane, take another look, then if its still clear
accelerate and complete the overtake. If not clear and you change your mind then you signal, move back left into the space you had vacated.
As a general method, it's safer than accelerating forward before being in a position to make a decision, (because the point of commitment is much earlier), and the same gotchas apply if you want to abort when using a less safe method.

PhilAsia

58 posts

10 months

Monday 5th February
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Pica-Pica said:
finishing touch said:
I've never done a car one but I did do half a bike course.

Some of the things they did frightened me and I would never consider their methods when on the road myself.

Other advice and methods were good, and I use them to this day, bike or car. Following electric pole lines for instance.

Not sure if I'd want to do one now.

Paul G
I am not sure what was said about following electric pole lines. My experience is that they do not always follow the road, in the country they veer away across fields. Remember, their intention is to minimise cable length between houses, which may not always follow the road route.
Rides a trail bike I guess.....

bilhound

Original Poster:

79 posts

21 months

Friday 11th May
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Bit of an update - have just renewed my bike insurance with IAM surety.

Last years fully comprehensive premium, £523 this was with Carole Nash on the 2nd year of a return to biking after a 4 year gap on a Z1000SX. No points, no claims. All mods declared.

This year - IAM Surety, £169 fully comp (Class 1), 3 points. All mods declared, but they were only bothered about those that increase HP by +10%, so classed as 'unmodified', I did check this thoroughly!

Couldn't believe how low it was, I was expecting a pretty huge hike given the spike in thefts.....