Men and overtaking

Men and overtaking

Author
Discussion

Dizeee

15,424 posts

165 months

Thursday 9th July
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Clearly, you have had no advanced training.

Speed addicted

4,350 posts

186 months

Thursday 9th July
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Blakewater said:
LunarOne said:
RobM77 said:
yes It's a limit, not a target. There are loads of reasons why someone might choose to go slowly; literally too many to even start listing. This is why overtaking is allowed.
Indeed. It is a limit rather than a target. However I treat it as guidance when the weather and road conditions suit. I recently posted a video of me hitting a pheasant on an NSL single carriageway road to Facebook, and a friend said, "You were going too fast surely?"
- despite being well below the speed limit for the majority of the time and just touching it at other times. It appears that the majority of drivers have absolutely no idea what is meant by National Speed Limit, nor when it applies. They don't know what those white roundels with the diagonal black line signify, and they have no idea that it's different for different kinds of vehicles. That probably explains 95% of the drive everywhere at 40 brigade.
If you collided with a hazard, you were going too fast to be able to stop within the distance you could see to be clear. Unless you kill wildlife deliberately, which isn't pleasant.
What if the hazard in question decided to appear out of the verge well under the distance you can actually stop?
This is a common tactic for pheasants, deer and other suicidal wildlife.

LunarOne

1,496 posts

96 months

Thursday 9th July
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Speed addicted said:
Blakewater said:
LunarOne said:
RobM77 said:
yes It's a limit, not a target. There are loads of reasons why someone might choose to go slowly; literally too many to even start listing. This is why overtaking is allowed.
Indeed. It is a limit rather than a target. However I treat it as guidance when the weather and road conditions suit. I recently posted a video of me hitting a pheasant on an NSL single carriageway road to Facebook, and a friend said, "You were going too fast surely?"
- despite being well below the speed limit for the majority of the time and just touching it at other times. It appears that the majority of drivers have absolutely no idea what is meant by National Speed Limit, nor when it applies. They don't know what those white roundels with the diagonal black line signify, and they have no idea that it's different for different kinds of vehicles. That probably explains 95% of the drive everywhere at 40 brigade.
If you collided with a hazard, you were going too fast to be able to stop within the distance you could see to be clear. Unless you kill wildlife deliberately, which isn't pleasant.
What if the hazard in question decided to appear out of the verge well under the distance you can actually stop?
This is a common tactic for pheasants, deer and other suicidal wildlife.
Which is exactly what happened. I'm not sure how Blakewater would have avoided it! There's no evidence that driving slower would have prevented the collision, as the pheasant could have just run out at any time!

Salted_Peanut

419 posts

13 months

Thursday 9th July
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James-m5qjf said:
Are your posts some sort of wind up, or are you just bonkers?
What was "bonkers" about the post you quoted by Dizeee?

Solocle

1,603 posts

43 months

Thursday 9th July
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Blakewater said:
I've stopped for a pheasant but I have bounced a bird off my windscreen when exiting a wildfowl sanctuary of all places.

I was just highlighting that a video of you hitting something isn't the best way to make a point about speed, though mishaps like this can't always be avoided.

It is worth being aware of where there might be something large enough to kill you, such as deer. That's why areas with wild ponies such as Exmoor tend to have 40mph limits on their country roads.

For the easily triggered, I have had advanced driving tuition with a driver trainer not far from this forum and frequently overtake multiple vehicles at a time on single carriageway roads. I can't abide the current culture of speed limits being reduced everywhere, but it is important to be as discreet as possible with faster driving to try and avoid outraging people.
I have overtaken two motor vehicles at once a couple of times, on a bicycle, not counting filtering up queues!

In the last instance, it was a car sat behind a tractor on an NSL B road. They were following too closely to see past, I saw a clear run, so blasted past them both! The car then followed me through, as I had anticipated, and was on his way past me soon enough.

LimSlip

616 posts

13 months

Thursday 9th July
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Solocle said:
New tyres being worn in, a nauseous/nervous passenger, a warning light coming on...
I can't remember having a single set of new tyres than didn't offer pretty much full grip fro the moment I left the tyre fitters. Do you get special Vaseline soaked tyres?

If you feel compelled to drive slowly do you pull over to let any queues pass? After all if you aren't in a rush then regular stops should be ok?

Salted_Peanut

419 posts

13 months

Friday 10th July
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Motorbike tyres are slippery when new, and require wearing in before they grip properly. I thought car tyres didn’t have this problem, but this author disagrees:

Mark Hinchliffe said:
tyre manufacturers use chemicals in the curing process to make the rubber flow better and reduce defects in the surface and tread pattern. This results in slick or glossy surfaces, which applies to both motorcycle and car tyres
It's a significant problem for new bike tyres but is it an issue for cars?

NewUsername

925 posts

15 months

Friday 10th July
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Salted_Peanut said:
Motorbike tyres are slippery when new, and require wearing in before they grip properly. I thought car tyres didn’t have this problem, but this author disagrees:

Mark Hinchliffe said:
tyre manufacturers use chemicals in the curing process to make the rubber flow better and reduce defects in the surface and tread pattern. This results in slick or glossy surfaces, which applies to both motorcycle and car tyres
It's a significant problem for new bike tyres but is it an issue for cars?
Yep new tyres always need a few miles on them for me before they give their full grip. Basically untill the releasing agent has gone

Speed addicted

4,350 posts

186 months

Friday 10th July
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NewUsername said:
Salted_Peanut said:
Motorbike tyres are slippery when new, and require wearing in before they grip properly. I thought car tyres didn’t have this problem, but this author disagrees:

Mark Hinchliffe said:
tyre manufacturers use chemicals in the curing process to make the rubber flow better and reduce defects in the surface and tread pattern. This results in slick or glossy surfaces, which applies to both motorcycle and car tyres
It's a significant problem for new bike tyres but is it an issue for cars?
Yep new tyres always need a few miles on them for me before they give their full grip. Basically untill the releasing agent has gone
Motorbike tyres don’t use a release agent anymore, they use smooth moulds to make it easier to get the tyres out.
It’s this smooth surface that’s more slippery than used tyres, but it’s no where near as bad as they used to be.


Dizeee

15,424 posts

165 months

Friday 10th July
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No motorbike tyres need wearing in at 20 mph on a straight dry road.


Salted_Peanut

419 posts

13 months

Friday 10th July
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I can't remember ever seeing a motorbike doing 20 mph on a straight dry road laugh

Blakewater

3,593 posts

116 months

Friday 10th July
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LunarOne said:
Which is exactly what happened. I'm not sure how Blakewater would have avoided it! There's no evidence that driving slower would have prevented the collision, as the pheasant could have just run out at any time!
Maybe not as it was something small running quickly out of the shadow of a tree. But to play devil's advocate, what if something had been coming out of that entranceway on the left? What if something more than just a pheasant had run out? Perhaps a dear, jogger or cyclist coming from the shady spot under the tree?




LunarOne

1,496 posts

96 months

Friday 10th July
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Blakewater said:
LunarOne said:
Which is exactly what happened. I'm not sure how Blakewater would have avoided it! There's no evidence that driving slower would have prevented the collision, as the pheasant could have just run out at any time!
Maybe not as it was something small running quickly out of the shadow of a tree. But to play devil's advocate, what if something had been coming out of that entranceway on the left? What if something more than just a pheasant had run out? Perhaps a dear, jogger or cyclist coming from the shady spot under the tree?
I've counted frames by pausing and using the < and > keys to move one frame at a time on Youtube. The original video was possibly 60fps and much clearer but I'm not able to access it quickly. But anyway, there are 25 frames between the bird becoming visible and impact. I'd imagine that a dear, or perhaps a deer, a jogger or a cyclist would hopefully be visible much sooner than 0.5 to 1 second before impact due to their size and I'd be able to take avoiding action. That said, there are certain collisions which cannot be avoided no matter how slowly you go. This one springs to mind. I hope they bought a lottery ticket right after buying new underwear!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUDpjeUzPBw


Edited by LunarOne on Friday 10th July 20:09

RSTurboPaul

3,255 posts

217 months

Sunday 19th July
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LunarOne said:
I've counted frames by pausing and using the < and > keys to move one frame at a time on Youtube. The original video was possibly 60fps and much clearer but I'm not able to access it quickly. But anyway, there are 25 frames between the bird becoming visible and impact. I'd imagine that a dear, or perhaps a deer, a jogger or a cyclist would hopefully be visible much sooner than 0.5 to 1 second before impact due to their size and I'd be able to take avoiding action. That said, there are certain collisions which cannot be avoided no matter how slowly you go. This one springs to mind. I hope they bought a lottery ticket right after buying new underwear!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUDpjeUzPBw

Edited by LunarOne on Friday 10th July 20:09
That is definitely a case of 'New pants, please'!!

PhilAsia

95 posts

34 months

Sunday 6th September
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LunarOne said:
I've counted frames by pausing and using the < and > keys to move one frame at a time on Youtube. The original video was possibly 60fps and much clearer but I'm not able to access it quickly. But anyway, there are 25 frames between the bird becoming visible and impact. I'd imagine that a dear, or perhaps a deer, a jogger or a cyclist would hopefully be visible much sooner than 0.5 to 1 second before impact due to their size and I'd be able to take avoiding action. That said, there are certain collisions which cannot be avoided no matter how slowly you go. This one springs to mind. I hope they bought a lottery ticket right after buying new underwear!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUDpjeUzPBw


Edited by LunarOne on Friday 10th July 20:09
Since this ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93RwJTg8R_w ), I make progress one building compliance document at a time. Driving the 30km into Manila progresses slowly and takes about four days on average now, as government release of permit papers are not too swift. And, as nonsexygeeser states (quite rightly), one can never be too careful...

Johnnytheboy

21,113 posts

145 months

Sunday 6th September
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Still no sign of the OP.... scratchchin

LunarOne

1,496 posts

96 months

Sunday 6th September
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Is that a problem? Once someone births a thread it takes on a life of its own and the parent, the OP is no longer required!

Johnnytheboy

21,113 posts

145 months

Sunday 6th September
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LunarOne said:
Is that a problem? Once someone births a thread it takes on a life of its own and the parent, the OP is no longer required!
I'm more intrigued by their motives in this case...

Westblue

Original Poster:

48 posts

56 months

Thursday 1st October
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Johnnytheboy said:
I'm more intrigued by their motives in this case...
My motives? I was interested to hear people's opinions and comments on the subject, having had several quite odd / unhappy reactions to my overtaking men.

And - it is nice to see Vonhosen is still around. He and Derek Smith talk lots and lots of sense.

Johnnytheboy

21,113 posts

145 months

Thursday 1st October
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Westblue said:
He and Derek Smith talk lots...
Can't argue with that!