Electric bicycles - who buys them?

Electric bicycles - who buys them?

Author
Discussion

NickCQ

3,881 posts

59 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
DonkeyApple said:
Because it’s zero interest in the loan which means you’re making a profit of 5-6% over a normal loan and it’s less than a Starbucks a day anyway so practically free in the first instance.
But it's a depreciating asset! wink

Coolbanana

3,116 posts

163 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
As a commuting bike in cities like Amsterdam they make sense.

I don't see many about but there are some, especially good of course for older people who want to do some pedalling exercise but with sore joints can't do too much.

My wife and I own an apartment in Amsterdam but no car, not needed. We rent one if we have a distance to travel that requires it. I have considered getting a couple of scooters for when I am there but think if I wanted assisted power, an electric bike would be the way to go.

ChasW

2,011 posts

165 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
My daughter has one. Bought it 2nd hand, <£1000, and had it delivered to my house. It was great fun to ride. Makes a huge difference to her as she runs a delivery business in central London.

Dog Star

12,190 posts

131 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
I think they're fantastic - electric bikes are the future.

You can get around in urban areas faster than a car, you can get through "snickets" and bollards, use bike paths, get kegged up, free parking. There are absolutely no disadvantages except getting wet (but you get wet walking). Give it another ten years (probably less) when most cities and big towns are really cranking up the restrictions on cars then they will make even more sense.

My parents who are both in their 70s have some "Hopper" ebikes, they're quite cheap shopper style things and they regularly go on 60 mile bike rides (they take them in their motorhome). I've borrowed one for getting to work in Leeds when dropping my car in for a service and they (feel like they) bomb along.

They'll encourage the uptake of cycling in urban areas with hills - in my local town which is full of hills the only sort of person that cycles to work is an enthusiast - you need a shower as it's all hills and you'd be a sweaty mess. Ebikes = arriving relatively refreshed.

So it's a bit thumbsup from me. A genuine and worthwhile alternative to public transport and I can see one being how I and Mrs DS will get around in our dotage - one small car and ebikes.

Incidentally - check out your cycle to work scheme if your employer does one. Mine allows eBikes and this year I will be adding to my collection of cycle to work mountain bikes by getting an electric mountain bike - if you're a higher rate tax payer they're well nigh half price.

Hoofy

71,473 posts

245 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
I'd get one to troll Wiggins Wannabes around Richmond Park. Just set it to 1mph faster and watch them try to overtake to prove a point (whatever the point is?). biggrin

RobM77

35,349 posts

197 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
They're very useful for people who like cycling and want to keep fit, but are worried about being too far from home if and when they get worn out, or a medical problem such as a knee or hip joint flares up. They're also good for people living in very hilly areas who don't have the fitness to cycle up the steeper hills. I think they're a great idea - more people keeping fit and easing congestion and pollution is always a good thing isn't it?

wolfie1978

384 posts

127 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
I have one, purchased through my works cycle2work scheme. Mines a carrera and only £1,250 so at the lower end, i got it because i'm a fat bd and a regular cycle gave me back ache when going up the steep hill on my commute home. The 2 miles each way wasn't doing my car any good so to me the e-bike was a good option

yellowjack

13,994 posts

129 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
Hoofy said:
I'd get one to troll Wiggins Wannabes around Richmond Park. Just set it to 1mph faster and watch them try to overtake to prove a point (whatever the point is?). biggrin
Clue: At that level of assistance, your 'leccy' bike will likely run out of juice before some "Wiggins Wannabe's" legs do...

...and that's before you get to the issue of it being illegal to have electrical assistance that operates above <either 15 mph or 20 mph, I can't recall, but it's definitely a lot lower speed than a decent cyclist can maintain around Richmond Park > so you'd need to de-restrict the motor, or build one yourself.

Weird the lengths people will go to to "troll" cyclists... rolleyes

Cupramax

9,447 posts

215 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
25kmh, 15.5mph is the uk legal pedal assisted limit.

C70R

7,663 posts

67 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
yellowjack said:
Hoofy said:
I'd get one to troll Wiggins Wannabes around Richmond Park. Just set it to 1mph faster and watch them try to overtake to prove a point (whatever the point is?). biggrin
Clue: At that level of assistance, your 'leccy' bike will likely run out of juice before some "Wiggins Wannabe's" legs do...

...and that's before you get to the issue of it being illegal to have electrical assistance that operates above <either 15 mph or 20 mph, I can't recall, but it's definitely a lot lower speed than a decent cyclist can maintain around Richmond Park > so you'd need to de-restrict the motor, or build one yourself.

Weird the lengths people will go to to "troll" cyclists... rolleyes
I bet you're a barrel of laughs at a dinner party.

Riley Blue

17,437 posts

189 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
RobM77 said:
They're very useful for people who like cycling and want to keep fit, but are worried about being too far from home if and when they get worn out, or a medical problem such as a knee or hip joint flares up. They're also good for people living in very hilly areas who don't have the fitness to cycle up the steeper hills. I think they're a great idea - more people keeping fit and easing congestion and pollution is always a good thing isn't it?
That's exactly the reason I'd get one. I have iffy knees and hips and much as I'd like to go cycling, if they give out when I'm miles from home I'd be stuck, unable to ride or walk back. An electric bike would overcome that risk.

Finlandia

7,803 posts

194 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
yellowjack said:
Hoofy said:
I'd get one to troll Wiggins Wannabes around Richmond Park. Just set it to 1mph faster and watch them try to overtake to prove a point (whatever the point is?). biggrin
Clue: At that level of assistance, your 'leccy' bike will likely run out of juice before some "Wiggins Wannabe's" legs do...

...and that's before you get to the issue of it being illegal to have electrical assistance that operates above <either 15 mph or 20 mph, I can't recall, but it's definitely a lot lower speed than a decent cyclist can maintain around Richmond Park > so you'd need to de-restrict the motor, or build one yourself.

Weird the lengths people will go to to "troll" cyclists... rolleyes
There are e-bikes that look just like normal e-bikes, but are in fact e-mopeds, with a top speed of 45kph and a range of up to 80km wink




wolfie1978

384 posts

127 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
Riley Blue said:
That's exactly the reason I'd get one. I have iffy knees and hips and much as I'd like to go cycling, if they give out when I'm miles from home I'd be stuck, unable to ride or walk back. An electric bike would overcome that risk.
You still have to cycle, the motor won't assist you if the pedals aren't turning

P700DEE

1,004 posts

193 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
From the only owner of one I have met , reason for purchase was drink drive ban!!

andrewrob

2,911 posts

153 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
I bought a chinese hub drive kit on ebay when they had a 20% off day for £160.
Mine was for commuting, already had enough batteries from my drones so wired those in, covered nearly 3000 miles on it riding down muddy canal paths, leaving it outside all through winter and it still works perfectly every time.

Dog Star

12,190 posts

131 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
P700DEE said:
From the only owner of one I have met , reason for purchase was drink drive ban!!
Some boring tt will be along any second to tell you that it's still illegal (yes, we all know. Nobody cares) and possibly even try to tell us we will lose our car licences.

One of the reasons I got my cycle to work bike was for going to the pub and for Sunday afternoon beer-cycling. (Although I must admit I tend to only ride on the pavements as it's too dangerous on the road).

Hoofy

71,473 posts

245 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
C70R said:
yellowjack said:
Hoofy said:
I'd get one to troll Wiggins Wannabes around Richmond Park. Just set it to 1mph faster and watch them try to overtake to prove a point (whatever the point is?). biggrin
Clue: At that level of assistance, your 'leccy' bike will likely run out of juice before some "Wiggins Wannabe's" legs do...

...and that's before you get to the issue of it being illegal to have electrical assistance that operates above <either 15 mph or 20 mph, I can't recall, but it's definitely a lot lower speed than a decent cyclist can maintain around Richmond Park > so you'd need to de-restrict the motor, or build one yourself.

Weird the lengths people will go to to "troll" cyclists... rolleyes
I bet you're a barrel of laughs at a dinner party.
hehe

Don't worry, I have no desire to get on a bicycle. I was just teasing.

yellowjack

13,994 posts

129 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
P700DEE said:
From the only owner of one I have met , reason for purchase was drink drive ban!!
I met three more "mature" gentlemen in Peaslake village. Their combined age was "more than 210 years" and all three were on electric assist MTBs. In their own words, they were "well past it" if they had to pedal their way up to get to the downs. But with pedal assist, they were able to keep on riding "well into their 70s". Still getting out, still getting some exercise,and still keeping their minds sharp dodging trees and roots in the Surrey Hills.

Oh, and the only other e-bike rider I've spoken to was one that flew past me up a hill in Essex. He was dressed in pin-stripe suit, woolen full length coat, and shiny leather shoes, with a large briefcase strapped to the rear rack. I was in full Lycra, slogging myself into a puddle of sweat. I soon caught him on the downhill, and the subsequent flat section. He was a "serious cyclist" too, but just wanted to commute into London in 'normal' work clothes without getting himself sweaty. It was working too.

There are so many different reasons to own and ride an electric bike...

superlightr

10,889 posts

226 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
yellowjack said:
P700DEE said:
From the only owner of one I have met , reason for purchase was drink drive ban!!
I met three more "mature" gentlemen in Peaslake village. Their combined age was "more than 210 years" and all three were on electric assist MTBs. In their own words, they were "well past it" if they had to pedal their way up to get to the downs. But with pedal assist, they were able to keep on riding "well into their 70s". Still getting out, still getting some exercise,and still keeping their minds sharp dodging trees and roots in the Surrey Hills.

Oh, and the only other e-bike rider I've spoken to was one that flew past me up a hill in Essex. He was dressed in pin-stripe suit, woolen full length coat, and shiny leather shoes, with a large briefcase strapped to the rear rack. I was in full Lycra, slogging myself into a puddle of sweat. I soon caught him on the downhill, and the subsequent flat section. He was a "serious cyclist" too, but just wanted to commute into London in 'normal' work clothes without getting himself sweaty. It was working too.

There are so many different reasons to own and ride an electric bike...
Its excellent. Takes the pain of the hills away and enjoy the downhills. Painful knees which were ok for road but not for the hills on the MTB hence why I bought a MTB one a year ago. Fantastic - its put the fun back into MTBing for me.



DonkeyApple

40,202 posts

132 months

Monday 26th March 2018
quotequote all
giantdefy said:
daddy cool said:
I'll get an electric bike when I'm too infirm to ride a standard one...
Yep, but at 65 I may well have got there. Thinking of converting my winter hack to electric, lot cheaper at ~£6/700
There is an old boy round here who uses one. He must be nudging towards 80 and he zooms up and down the hills at a good pace. They seem brilliant for that sort of use. Or if you’re in a particularly hilly area.