Amazingly cool and interesting plane footage

Amazingly cool and interesting plane footage

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Discussion

Oilchange

7,161 posts

227 months

Monday 10th May
quotequote all
Might not have made the slightest difference.

It looked to me like he pulled in power either to 'taxi' forward (involves tilting the disc forward) or possibly to climb (less likely I think), at which point the water engulfed the nose pulling it down and the power pulled the tail up, hence the blade tips impacting the water.
I can only guess though.

Shinysideup

701 posts

149 months

Monday 10th May
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Not sure if it was a frame rate issue with the camera but it looked like he lost authority over the tail rotor, you can see the torque of the main rotor acting on the fuselage. Not sure why he tried to continue after that.

Oilchange

7,161 posts

227 months

Monday 10th May
quotequote all
The pattern certainly changes markedly during the hover and yaw right, almost as if the rotor rpm deteriorates causing the descent.

Could have been a single engine failure

LotusOmega375D

5,590 posts

120 months

Monday 10th May
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Weird how no-one seemed to want to go and save the crew after it inverted.

essayer

7,379 posts

161 months

Monday 10th May
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Did the crew bail out? Weird they didn’t shut it down after it presumably took on water

MartG

18,124 posts

171 months

Bonefish Blues

18,307 posts

190 months

Wednesday 12th May
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That's a cool thing - and I never thought about arriving wrapped up, either smile

BrettMRC

2,099 posts

127 months

Wednesday 12th May
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Another AW609 smile


DanL

4,114 posts

232 months

Wednesday 12th May
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BrettMRC said:
Another AW609 smile

I’m sure it’s technically impressive, but is it solving a problem anyone really has? I assume it’s faster than a helicopter, but helicopters are surely quick enough (compared with driving)?

Feels as though it’s neither fish nor fowl…

Also, what happens if you lose an engine?

Oilchange

7,161 posts

227 months

Wednesday 12th May
quotequote all
They may be linked by a common gearbox.

Just to add, I suspect they are powered in a similar fashion to a helicopter, ie a sprague clutch, or freewheeling clutch, engine blows on the turbine, IT turns the blades but if the engine stops blowing it won't immediately slow down as the other one is still blowing on the other side, linked by said gearbox.
There is no physical connection between the engines and the rotors.
This is just a guess btw.



Edited by Oilchange on Wednesday 12th May 16:35

Munter

30,704 posts

208 months

Wednesday 12th May
quotequote all
DanL said:
I’m sure it’s technically impressive, but is it solving a problem anyone really has?
I guess if you regularly find you want to carry more people/load than the average helicopter, but you want to go places the private jet can't land. Then you want this.

tog

4,041 posts

195 months

Wednesday 12th May
quotequote all
Oilchange said:
They may be linked by a common gearbox.
The Osprey certainly is - each engine can drive both props.

FourWheelDrift

82,476 posts

251 months

Wednesday 12th May
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I'm surprised they are doing it, the Osprey has proved to be a very expensive and had more than it's fair share of incidents - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accidents_and_incide...
Unless the Osprey is too complicated being a military project and the AW has been simplified with improved reliability for civilian service. They have priced it at $24m less than half the $57m cost of an Osprey even accounting for the size difference. But $24m for a 4-9 passenger sized aircraft, who'd buy it when a comparable jet or helicopter is $5m-$10m. Could air ambulance or rescue services justify spending that much when they could get two helicopters plus change?

Still wouldn't get me in one though.

MartG

18,124 posts

171 months

Wednesday 12th May
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Pretty sure the AW609 doesn't have all the powered wing & rotor folding gubbinry of the V-22

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_45aUrES-j0

Speed 3

3,323 posts

86 months

Wednesday 12th May
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I worked at the major helicopter operator that placed the first "order", buying aircraft and engines in my role. It made no economic sense then and it still doesn't now. AW (as was) just wanted our name on the order book, no money changed hands. I can't believe Leonardo have ploughed so much money and effort into it. Bell had the right idea getting out of the JV.

Shame, Cascina Costa's a nice place to do business. The Somma Lombardo site was even more evocative of old Italian Engineering Industry given its history with motorbikes as well as aviation. Loved my visits there.

JuniorD

8,285 posts

190 months

Wednesday 12th May
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It’s a cool, fast looking aircraft. It puts me in mind of the Grumman Tigercat.

Ayahuasca

26,807 posts

246 months

Wednesday 12th May
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https://youtu.be/Z0VY1Qe4QmI

1966 British Aviation ‘Look at Life’. What a brave new world it was going to be, that had such machines in it.

slartibartfast

3,916 posts

168 months

Monday 24th May
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Ayahuasca said:
https://youtu.be/Z0VY1Qe4QmI

1966 British Aviation ‘Look at Life’. What a brave new world it was going to be, that had such machines in it.
saddest part of that video is that almost all those aircraft no longer fly.


MartG

18,124 posts

171 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
slartibartfast said:
Ayahuasca said:
https://youtu.be/Z0VY1Qe4QmI

1966 British Aviation ‘Look at Life’. What a brave new world it was going to be, that had such machines in it.
saddest part of that video is that almost all those aircraft no longer fly.
To be fair, there are very few vehicles from 55 years ago still running frown

yellowjack

14,472 posts

133 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
MartG said:
slartibartfast said:
Ayahuasca said:
https://youtu.be/Z0VY1Qe4QmI

1966 British Aviation ‘Look at Life’. What a brave new world it was going to be, that had such machines in it.
saddest part of that video is that almost all those aircraft no longer fly.
To be fair, there are very few vehicles from 55 years ago still running frown
Oh, there are still some IN SERVICE from that era...



...like the FV 432 Mk 3 (Bulldog). GKN Sankey built the last hull in 1971. OK, many were upgraded from Mk 2/1 standard to Mk 3, but that was engine/gearbox, driver controls, and braking system mostly. The bulk of the vehicle is the same as when it first went into service. My old wagon was built in 1966, for instance, and was in service until at least 2008. Although they are all a bit "Trigger's Broom" due to regular base overhauls...