Decent red wine for a tenner? (better than Barossa Ink)

Decent red wine for a tenner? (better than Barossa Ink)

Author
Discussion

RicksAlfas

12,044 posts

221 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Cabalié is good and in budget if there's an offer on, or you buy lots!




https://www.laithwaites.co.uk/product/0022621?CID=...

andy_s

18,449 posts

236 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Bullett said:
I like - Bread & Butter Cabernet Sauvignon 2019, California - I paid £10 a bottle last time but it seems a bit higher at the moment.
Just popped in to mention this too.

Bullett

10,303 posts

161 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Nice, the Chardonnay is pretty damn good as well.

QuartzDad

1,625 posts

99 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
RicksAlfas said:
Cabalié is good and in budget if there's an offer on, or you buy lots!
Our favourite by far, smoother than a very smooth thing.


Edited by QuartzDad on Friday 13th May 15:09

Riley Blue

18,956 posts

203 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Evoluzione said:
Yellowtail Shiraz or Merlot.
For extreme fruitiness try their Jammy Red Roo, £7 or less.

otolith

47,827 posts

181 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
I've had (and enjoyed) all of those Laithwaites offerings. From them I would also suggest The Waxed Bat and The Black Stump.

https://www.laithwaites.co.uk/product/0125021
https://www.laithwaites.co.uk/product/The-Black-St...

And the last mixed case I got had a couple of bottles of Rex Mundi, which I like and have bought before but not from them.

https://www.laithwaites.co.uk/product/1419120

oddman

1,268 posts

229 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Wine bore alert.

'quaffing', 'smooth', 'easy drinking' are all a bit of a trigger for me. They speak of thoughtless heavy drinking for intoxication rather than taste. How do I know - I'm as guilty as anyone - I keep simple wines like these around if I want to open a second bottle to stop me wasting the good stuff when I've already pickled my palate.

Shamefully these wines are designed for us Brits and our barbaric drinking culture. As one poster put it 'alcoholic ribena'. I would hazard you could make a nice 'wine' to satisfy this craving with a bottle of vodka shaken with a jar of jam diluted appropriately. Decent wine should offer everything it has for a sip not a gulp. They are part of a trend to industrial food and distance the producer from the consumer.

Look at the names and labels of most of what has been posted. They are designed by a marketing team and intended to disguise rather than inform you of what's inside. Most of these wines will have no information about vineyard or wine making practices. Some don't even have vintage statements. They will have been subjected to trickery such as late harvesting to maximise sugar, addition of sugar if required and reverse osmosis. They will have been filtered to within an inch of their lives so that some poor punter doesn't encounter a nasty residue.

I tried a case of Laithwaites wines on special introductory offer and expected great things. They were ludicrously alcoholic, jammy, smooth and characterless. I think The Wine Society is probably the best online source for value wines of character.

There are loads of producers working hard to make wines that express the character of the grape and place they are grown. They tend to be wines that go better with food as the alcohol and fruit is balanced with acidity and tannin which taste less pleasant when food (particularly fat and salt) isn't taken together with the wine.

Rant over - in answer to the question I think you can't go wrong with Rhône Village wines Cairanne, Vacqueyras, Ventoux and Rasteau. Also supermarket 'Taste the Difference' tyoe wines of the French South West such as Languedoc, Cahors, Pays d'Oc, Catalanes. These are usually 13.5-14.5% full bodied but with balancing tannins and acidity and interesting aromatics.

Reds to swerve a under £10 are Bordeaux, Burgundy and big name Rhônes such as Châteauneuf, Crozes Hermitage, St Joseph.

Portugal a good call too.

otolith

47,827 posts

181 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Personally, I am more frequently disappointed with wines from France than from anywhere else. They make some wonderful wines, and an awful lot of overpriced crap. But one man's "austere and elegant" is another man's "thin and sour", and as the French say (while urinating into the vats headed for British supermarkets) "chacun à son goût"

vixen1700

18,530 posts

247 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
This is a firm favourite from my local French restaurant.

Slightly over budget at £11.75, but lovely.

https://8rocks.co.uk/product/terre-de-mistral-dest...

Terre de Mistral Cotes du Rhone. smile

oddman

1,268 posts

229 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
otolith said:
Personally, I am more frequently disappointed with wines from France than from anywhere else. They make some wonderful wines, and an awful lot of overpriced crap. But one man's "austere and elegant" is another man's "thin and sour", and as the French say (while urinating into the vats headed for British supermarkets) "chacun à son goût"
No doubt - which is why I said what might be best avoided. The lesser known villages and regions and small producers aren't trading on their names and supermarkets have very good buyers. Morrisons, Lidl and Aldi in particular.

I wouldn't recommend any of the wines I mentioned without food (even just a cracker and cheese). I do think we tune our palates to accept more agreeable tastes and textures (smooth sweet) and reject the more challenging ones. Very few people would drink beer or gin if they went off their first impression.

I think it's a good idea to give up sugar in tea and coffee and avoid regular sugary or sweetened drinks if you want to taste anything properly.

otolith

47,827 posts

181 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Absolutely. But intense, high alcohol wines are not necessarily off-dry, nor are they necessarily fruit driven.

otherman

2,108 posts

142 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Given the fine selection of wines mentioned so far, I'm surprised there's no love for Diablo. The dark red is our favourite although the cab sav is also very good.

C70R

10,622 posts

81 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
This has no right being as cheap as it is. Stonking, easy drinking Pinot Noir. https://www.waitrosecellar.com/marsolay-pinot-noir...

Evoluzione

8,332 posts

220 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Riley Blue said:
Evoluzione said:
Yellowtail Shiraz or Merlot.
For extreme fruitiness try their Jammy Red Roo, £7 or less.
Yes I did consider including it, but a bit too sweet for me.

garyhun

32,619 posts

205 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
oddman said:
Wine bore alert.

'quaffing', 'smooth', 'easy drinking' are all a bit of a trigger for me. They speak of thoughtless heavy drinking for intoxication rather than taste. How do I know - I'm as guilty as anyone - I keep simple wines like these around if I want to open a second bottle to stop me wasting the good stuff when I've already pickled my palate.

Shamefully these wines are designed for us Brits and our barbaric drinking culture. As one poster put it 'alcoholic ribena'. I would hazard you could make a nice 'wine' to satisfy this craving with a bottle of vodka shaken with a jar of jam diluted appropriately. Decent wine should offer everything it has for a sip not a gulp. They are part of a trend to industrial food and distance the producer from the consumer.

Look at the names and labels of most of what has been posted. They are designed by a marketing team and intended to disguise rather than inform you of what's inside. Most of these wines will have no information about vineyard or wine making practices. Some don't even have vintage statements. They will have been subjected to trickery such as late harvesting to maximise sugar, addition of sugar if required and reverse osmosis. They will have been filtered to within an inch of their lives so that some poor punter doesn't encounter a nasty residue.

I tried a case of Laithwaites wines on special introductory offer and expected great things. They were ludicrously alcoholic, jammy, smooth and characterless. I think The Wine Society is probably the best online source for value wines of character.

There are loads of producers working hard to make wines that express the character of the grape and place they are grown. They tend to be wines that go better with food as the alcohol and fruit is balanced with acidity and tannin which taste less pleasant when food (particularly fat and salt) isn't taken together with the wine.

Rant over - in answer to the question I think you can't go wrong with Rhône Village wines Cairanne, Vacqueyras, Ventoux and Rasteau. Also supermarket 'Taste the Difference' tyoe wines of the French South West such as Languedoc, Cahors, Pays d'Oc, Catalanes. These are usually 13.5-14.5% full bodied but with balancing tannins and acidity and interesting aromatics.

Reds to swerve a under £10 are Bordeaux, Burgundy and big name Rhônes such as Châteauneuf, Crozes Hermitage, St Joseph.

Portugal a good call too.
Agreed, a very boring and condescending post biggrin

OP asks for a good quaffing wine and gets some good replies. Whether that wine is used for "thoughtless heavy drinking for intoxication" is more down to the imbiber than the specific wine, I would wager.

I love my wine and can happily enjoy a single glass of a 'quaffing' wine as much as I can a bottle of Montrachet. There really are no rules where wine drinking is concerned.

Mr lestat

3,661 posts

167 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
richard at home said:
M22s said:
Porta6 is my go to

That's a new one to me. I'll give it a go. Cheers!
That’s very nice that, bought one from Asda today £6.50 on offer, have you tried Yellow Tail Jammy red roo


richard at home

Original Poster:

275 posts

95 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Evolved said:
19 crimes is a lovely Australian drop.

There are a few different ones within the range. All delicious. Full bodied and full of flavour.
Yep, drunk a lot of that, but Barossa Ink is better IMHO...

richard at home

Original Poster:

275 posts

95 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
Riley Blue said:
For extreme fruitiness try their Jammy Red Roo, £7 or less.
Yep, that's another fave of the misses. She loves Apothic which is like ribeena. Very very easy to quaff....


richard at home

Original Poster:

275 posts

95 months

Friday 13th May
quotequote all
oddman said:
Wine bore alert.

'quaffing', 'smooth', 'easy drinking' are all a bit of a trigger for me. They speak of thoughtless heavy drinking for intoxication rather than taste. How do I know - I'm as guilty as anyone - I keep simple wines like these around if I want to open a second bottle to stop me wasting the good stuff when I've already pickled my palate.

Shamefully these wines are designed for us Brits and our barbaric drinking culture. As one poster put it 'alcoholic ribena'. I would hazard you could make a nice 'wine' to satisfy this craving with a bottle of vodka shaken with a jar of jam diluted appropriately. Decent wine should offer everything it has for a sip not a gulp. They are part of a trend to industrial food and distance the producer from the consumer.

Look at the names and labels of most of what has been posted. They are designed by a marketing team and intended to disguise rather than inform you of what's inside. Most of these wines will have no information about vineyard or wine making practices. Some don't even have vintage statements. They will have been subjected to trickery such as late harvesting to maximise sugar, addition of sugar if required and reverse osmosis. They will have been filtered to within an inch of their lives so that some poor punter doesn't encounter a nasty residue.

I tried a case of Laithwaites wines on special introductory offer and expected great things. They were ludicrously alcoholic, jammy, smooth and characterless. I think The Wine Society is probably the best online source for value wines of character.

There are loads of producers working hard to make wines that express the character of the grape and place they are grown. They tend to be wines that go better with food as the alcohol and fruit is balanced with acidity and tannin which taste less pleasant when food (particularly fat and salt) isn't taken together with the wine.

Rant over - in answer to the question I think you can't go wrong with Rhône Village wines Cairanne, Vacqueyras, Ventoux and Rasteau. Also supermarket 'Taste the Difference' tyoe wines of the French South West such as Languedoc, Cahors, Pays d'Oc, Catalanes. These are usually 13.5-14.5% full bodied but with balancing tannins and acidity and interesting aromatics.

Reds to swerve a under £10 are Bordeaux, Burgundy and big name Rhônes such as Châteauneuf, Crozes Hermitage, St Joseph.

Portugal a good call too.
Yep, agree 100%.

BUT, I drink wine as a drink, to chill out and relax with. I totally respect people who like to explore the nuances of fine wine, but that ain't me. Fine ales on the other hand....

That's why I like Barossa Ink so much. You can drink it before a meal, with a meal, you can drink a bottle of it, its always reliable. It's never harsh.

Talking of the finer things in life, I once had a glass of 100 year old brandy. It was mind blowing (and I don't really like brandy) but at £2500 a bottle (probably more now), it was well, well out my reach as a Friday evening tipple!

I like cocktails too! Red Legs Rum, Ginger Beer and lime. Yum... Yeah I know I am a heathen