The PH Demographic as shown in Brexit threads

The PH Demographic as shown in Brexit threads

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Discussion

Greg66

8,839 posts

122 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
Isaac Hunt said:
Camoradi said:
Exactly .....

Education does not equal intelligence. Any fool knows that wink
Indeed. My nephew has an MA in Mathematics. He has no common sense or spacial awareness.

Additionally these days Universities seem to have a strong leaning to the left. No doubt that is permutated down to the students. The left tend to be more Rick adverse and potentially will favour remain.
I was going to ask how one teaches mathematics in a left wing style, but perhaps it is done by permutation.

Mathmos are notorious for being a bit, well, odd. The sort of people you keep in a windowless room and feed intractable problems and packets of crisps to. That seems to keep them happy. TBH if your nephew can tolerate sunlight he's doing all right by matho standards.

JagLover

25,771 posts

179 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
Kermit power said:
This makes it all the more puzzling to me that despite a demographic which should probably throw up relatively balanced volumes of contributors to any Brexit thread, the reality is that they are all overwhelmingly populated by Leave voters to a far greater extent than any statistics suggest they should be.
From memory the NPE poll for the 2015 elections was about 40% Tory 40% UKIP and 20% other parties. Based on that around 30% Remainer is probably about right and it is really to do with background and shared interests.

Construct a profile of a random individual by feeding in Gender, race, age, interests and with enough data a pollster could assign a percentage likelihood of which party they would vote for that would be reasonably accurate.

Edited to add not that far out 51% Tory, 30% UKIP

https://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&...

Edited by JagLover on Friday 11th January 18:09

Earthdweller

2,231 posts

70 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
98elise said:
PositronicRay said:
Digga said:
It's quite interesting that the educational level below degree is so evenly split. I'd assume (correct me if I am wrong) that the majority of such qualifications would likely be far more vocational than that of the degrees in the next band up. Shows a voting split that's the same as the actual referendum result.

Quoted for reference:
I think the education stat is linked to the age thing. Many more students go onto university now than in days of yore.

Edited by PositronicRay on Friday 11th January 14:53
Agreed. I did reasonably well at school, but left to do my HNV as part of my apprenticeship (so academically less than a degree).

I've ended up in IT and have a string of professional qualifications/exams, which would be typical for someone of my age who has followed a similar career path.

My father was a chartered engineer and didn't have a degree.

Remainers simply dismiss us as old thickos, but its just the way the world worked for our age group.
I’m very similar to you

Did well at school 10 O levels and 3 A levels .. I didn’t go to university.. very few of my peers did

But I did professional exams that would be the equivalent of degree level and continued to study and learn new skills

My father left school at 14, did an apprenticeship, then spent a while in the back of a Lancaster bomber, aged 18, going back to the factory after being demobbed, before eventually retiring as European Quality control director of a major European multinational

Neither of us are thick, but we don’t have degrees

However all my nephews/nieces are going to uni and I suspect so will my kids

We live in different times


Johnnytheboy

18,164 posts

130 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
That's a good point: this oft-repeated stat that graduates were more likely to vote Remain is probably largely explained by the vast expansion in uni education in the last couple of decades.

Young people more pro-Remain = more graduates pro-Remain.

Vanden Saab

2,989 posts

18 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
Digga said:
PositronicRay said:
Digga said:
It's quite interesting that the educational level below degree is so evenly split. I'd assume (correct me if I am wrong) that the majority of such qualifications would likely be far more vocational than that of the degrees in the next band up. Shows a voting split that's the same as the actual referendum result.

Quoted for reference:
I think the education stat is linked to the age thing. Many more students go onto university now than in days of yore.

Edited by PositronicRay on Friday 11th January 14:53
There has been, in recent years, a (welcome) resurgence in the numbers of apprenticeship schemes offered by the education system. I know this, because we've now had 3 apprentices through our engineering works. All such students will be qualified to some level of NVQ standard. The highest level for an NVQ is Level 5. However, students who complete an NVQ at Level 3 can then go on to study for a higher qualification such as a Foundation Degree, HND or HNC.
I do wonder how much of this is attached to how people of certain ages see education. I left school with 6 O levels and went on to complete an HNC in engineering but if I was asked that question would answer GCE level. After a career change I have NVQ 3 in my second occupation but again would only consider being educated to GCE Standard. If older people think this way but younger people select a the higher level option it could go a long way to explaining the figures...

tumble dryer

1,347 posts

71 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
Earthdweller said:
I’m very similar to you

Did well at school 10 O levels and 3 A levels .. I didn’t go to university.. very few of my peers did

But I did professional exams that would be the equivalent of degree level and continued to study and learn new skills

My father left school at 14, did an apprenticeship, then spent a while in the back of a Lancaster bomber, aged 18, going back to the factory after being demobbed, before eventually retiring as European Quality control director of a major European multinational

Neither of us are thick, but we don’t have degrees

However all my nephews/nieces are going to uni and I suspect so will my kids

We live in different times
And let us not forget the business that further education has become.

Never mind the 'loans', have you noticed all the shiny new buildings going up to temporarily house our cherished ones? A lot of money is invested in keeping this particular ball rolling.

alfie2244

11,012 posts

132 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
tumble dryer said:
And let us not forget the business that further education has become.

Never mind the 'loans', have you noticed all the shiny new buildings going up to temporarily house our cherished ones? A lot of money is invested in keeping this particular ball rolling.
The entire city of Bath doesn't have a police station...it has been sold to the Uni! Don't get me started on housing being built for students V local youngsters.

Randy Winkman

6,864 posts

133 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
chrispmartha said:
Digga said:
chrispmartha said:
The remainers you soeak of may post more often but there are far fewer of them, that’s probably why it may seem like there’s more ‘remainers’. One thing you cannot say about the brexiteers on here is that they are ‘shy’
Unfortunately, we all know why pro-Brexit voters are all too often reluctant to voice their actual opinions; there is a nasty streak out there who would shut down democratic debate with unpleasant, if not actually illegal actions and attitudes. This is, in no small part, why the result of the referendum was such a shock.
Oh give over!

There’s nasty streaks on both sides, this whole palaver has brought the worst out of this country IMO
Exactly. As PH favourite Jeremy Corbyn has recently said, it's ended up with different groups of people who share exactly the same concerns fighting with each other rather than a worthwhile target.

Dindoit

1,645 posts

38 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
Isaac Hunt said:
ETA just noticed the date 2015. The Brexit vote was 2016.
Eyes fading with age?

Isaac Hunt

10,131 posts

155 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
Dindoit said:
Isaac Hunt said:
ETA just noticed the date 2015. The Brexit vote was 2016.
Eyes fading with age?


Does that not say 2015 in the top LH corner?

(To be fair, my eyes are currently bksed as I have cataracts)

Johnnytheboy

18,164 posts

130 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
alfie2244 said:
tumble dryer said:
And let us not forget the business that further education has become.

Never mind the 'loans', have you noticed all the shiny new buildings going up to temporarily house our cherished ones? A lot of money is invested in keeping this particular ball rolling.
The entire city of Bath doesn't have a police station...it has been sold to the Uni! Don't get me started on housing being built for students V local youngsters.
Bournemouth is the same. Strikes me as a bit of a bubble. Students take degrees in subjects that won't get them jobs and pay for accommodation with loans they will never be able to repay.

But hey, I'm sure it's all fine.

Vanden Saab

2,989 posts

18 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
Isaac Hunt said:
Dindoit said:
Isaac Hunt said:
ETA just noticed the date 2015. The Brexit vote was 2016.
Eyes fading with age?


Does that not say 2015 in the top LH corner?

(To be fair, my eyes are currently bksed as I have cataracts)
It is using the 2015 general election for the party voting figures...


Having looked at that a few times I do wonder if those age figures are being used to make a point as there seems to be no reason for the arbitrary breakdown.
18-24 6 years
25-49 24 years
49-65 16 years
65+ . 35 years potentially...

The only two age numbers that make any sense are 18 and 65...

I have seen another similar survey that said that every age group over 40 had a majority to leave but the figures had a 40-55 age group or something like that.... I would love to see a survey with the figures for each year group but I have yet to see one online...


iphonedyou

7,532 posts

101 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
Isaac Hunt said:
Indeed. My nephew has an MA in Mathematics. He has no common sense or spacial awareness.

Additionally these days Universities seem to have a strong leaning to the left. No doubt that is permutated down to the students. The left tend to be more Rick adverse and potentially will favour remain.
Averse.

tumble dryer

1,347 posts

71 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
Johnnytheboy said:
alfie2244 said:
tumble dryer said:
And let us not forget the business that further education has become.

Never mind the 'loans', have you noticed all the shiny new buildings going up to temporarily house our cherished ones? A lot of money is invested in keeping this particular ball rolling.
The entire city of Bath doesn't have a police station...it has been sold to the Uni! Don't get me started on housing being built for students V local youngsters.
Bournemouth is the same. Strikes me as a bit of a bubble. Students take degrees in subjects that won't get them jobs and pay for accommodation with loans they will never be able to repay.

But hey, I'm sure it's all fine.
Desperately trying to drag back OT, sorry.

Strange though, don't you think, that it's the older demographic that can see what's happening here. A new generation providing a new wealth source before they've even started earning an income, wrapped-up in a modern day societal must.

The bogey men were easier to spot back in the day.

alfie2244

11,012 posts

132 months

Friday 11th January
quotequote all
iphonedyou said:
Isaac Hunt said:
Indeed. My nephew has an MA in Mathematics. He has no common sense or spacial awareness.

Additionally these days Universities seem to have a strong leaning to the left. No doubt that is permutated down to the students. The left tend to be more Rick adverse and potentially will favour remain.
Averse.
Rick? biggrin

AW111

4,798 posts

77 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
alfie2244 said:
Rick? biggrin
Most students are Neil or Vivian, and averse to Rick as a matter of course.

Isaac Hunt

10,131 posts

155 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
AW111 said:
alfie2244 said:
Rick? biggrin
Most students are Neil or Vivian, and averse to Rick as a matter of course.
In my defence, Imy eyes are currently bksed as I have cataracts and am awaiting an operation.

Glad you guys get off on mocking the disabled

limpsfield

4,856 posts

197 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
Isaac Hunt said:
AW111 said:
alfie2244 said:
Rick? biggrin
Most students are Neil or Vivian, and averse to Rick as a matter of course.
In my defence, Imy eyes are currently bksed as I have cataracts and am awaiting an operation.

Glad you guys get off on mocking the disabled
We are all psychic in here.

Or, as you might put it, sykick.

Isaac Hunt

10,131 posts

155 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
limpsfield said:
We are all psychic in here.

Or, as you might put it, sykick.
See my post further up the page....

Norfolkit

2,168 posts

134 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
Greg66 said:
I was going to ask how one teaches mathematics in a left wing style
Get the words "few" and "many" in there as often as possible, anything over one hundred is "many", anything under is "few", the number 100 itself is no longer to be used as that's reserved for the tax rate for rich Tory bds come the revolution.

Obviousy and fundamentally nothing is allowed to add up to what you think it should.

Left wing maths teaching is easy