Train passenger killed by tree branch

Train passenger killed by tree branch

Author
Discussion

austinsmirk

3,258 posts

61 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
some years ago I was at the Keighley and worth valley beer festival. I urge you to go. You can get drunk in an engine shed and on their old steam trains as they chuff down the tracks.

think railway children, for it is that line.

anyway, my friend and I were enjoying a crafty cig, whilst hanging out of the 1930's carriage door windows. I recall it being terrifying- steam train clattering about, old railway line with lots of trees/bushes- there really is a point where it dawns on you, this is a very stupid thing to do.

very sad for the girl and family though. we've all done stupid stuff.

DoubleD

6,890 posts

46 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
Digga said:
DoubleD said:
Digga said:
DoubleD said:
Digga said:
Also, to those who think it okay to chunder out of train windows, well it's better than throwing up in the carriage, but doers almost (because of the aerodynamics) nearly always spray the carriages behind with spew. Which isn't nice. Better off down the toilet or in a bag.
Nearly always.....how many people have you seen being sick out of a train window?
Never, but plenty of people spewing out of taxis; the aerodynamics are the same. It always ends up plastered down the side of the vehicle.
Your friends need to drink things that arent going to make them puke so much!
Drink enough of anything and it'll make you throw up, even water.

I have heard of similar tails on trans, but never seen it first hand. Some apocryphal story of someone going to the doors at the end of the carriage to throw up and then realising the whole carriage - every window - was plastered in the stuff.
I must be lucky then, I can drink loads and I never puke. It must be the training.

kev1974

2,562 posts

67 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
alangla said:
TTmonkey said:
Tree branch within a 'heads width' of a moving train? That there, that's bkss that is.
If only. Look down the side of most trains - you'll see scratches in the paint/vinyl where branches have scuffed the sides.
Network Rail's answer seems to be lots of tree-felling, but they you get the environmental complaints about the amount of trees being pulled down & the follow-up problems of landslips etc because the tree roots were holding embankments together.

In saying that, if you only ever see overhead electric trains, you're probably less likely to see the effects as the trees are normally clear of the overhead wires & support structures.
My daily train hits lots of shrubbery and branches as it goes along, the journey can be especially noisy when it's been raining and so the greenery is sitting slightly lower than normal. This isn't on some seldom used branch line, it's the stopping train on the Windsor loop to/from Waterloo via Hounslow, so a train every 7 or 15 minutes. The worst bits are between Barnes Bridge and Putney, then there's another bit between Clapham Junction and Queenstown Road where it will quite often hit the greenery if the train gets allocated the outer track. I expect the trains themselves keep the greenery in check by bashing a few mm off the end whenever it gets too long or as mentioned, rainy days.

3rd Rail not overhead supply, and no (public) trains with opening windows ever go on those tracks, so I guess Network Rail have done their risk assessment on it and deemed it safe.

Evoluzione

3,143 posts

181 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
austinsmirk said:
some years ago I was at the Keighley and worth valley beer festival. I urge you to go. You can get drunk in an engine shed and on their old steam trains as they chuff down the tracks.

think railway children, for it is that line.

anyway, my friend and I were enjoying a crafty cig, whilst hanging out of the 1930's carriage door windows. I recall it being terrifying- steam train clattering about, old railway line with lots of trees/bushes- there really is a point where it dawns on you, this is a very stupid thing to do.

very sad for the girl and family though. we've all done stupid stuff.
I've been there, stayed in my seat though wink
I noted that last year the railways around Leeds had a huge tree lopping operation too.

TwistingMyMelon

5,219 posts

143 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
Poor girl, we all make mistakes when we are young, I know I did that make me shudder now

Advertisement

oyster

8,785 posts

186 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
What never ceases to amaze me on this website is how popular victim-bashing is.

I wonder how many of those people passing judgement based on warning signs, drive home every single day with no regard to the little round warning signs with a red outline?

227bhp

8,159 posts

66 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
oyster said:
What never ceases to amaze me on this website is how popular victim-bashing is.

I wonder how many of those people passing judgement based on warning signs, drive home every single day with no regard to the little round warning signs with a red outline?
I do, but it's at my risk. If I exceed the speed limit and have an accident it's my fault and you're welcome to laugh at me if you wish.

gazza285

4,727 posts

146 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
oyster said:
What never ceases to amaze me on this website is how popular victim-bashing is.

I wonder how many of those people passing judgement based on warning signs, drive home every single day with no regard to the little round warning signs with a red outline?
Perhaps all those that ignore the warning signs are all dead as well.

TTmonkey

14,483 posts

185 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
I get the fact that trees and bushes grow and might reach out and touch a train, thin little bushes and whips. But a branch large and strong enough to kill someone...? Wow. Seriously surprising that this could happen. If it’s that substantial that it causes her fatal injuries, then you’d think it substantial enough to damage a train window if the wind blows it into the path of the train?

I’ve only ever seen train lines where there is a good dozen feet clearance around where the tracks are. The rail companies usually seem very keen to descimate the fauna.

Utterly regrettable death of a young person, and a sad way to go.

eldar

12,029 posts

134 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
oyster said:
What never ceases to amaze me on this website is how popular victim-bashing is.

I wonder how many of those people passing judgement based on warning signs, drive home every single day with no regard to the little round warning signs with a red outline?
None of them, otherwise they wouldn’t be posting.

oyster

8,785 posts

186 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
gazza285 said:
oyster said:
What never ceases to amaze me on this website is how popular victim-bashing is.

I wonder how many of those people passing judgement based on warning signs, drive home every single day with no regard to the little round warning signs with a red outline?
Perhaps all those that ignore the warning signs are all dead as well.
The mature, grown-up response.

PurpleTurtle

2,830 posts

82 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
It’s incredibly sad that a young girl has died in tragic circumstances, this is someone’s daughter FFS.

Pretty appalling that the assembled ranks of NP&E like to polish their superiority complex by posting about ‘natural selection’ and the like. Make you feel good about yourselves does it? Pricks.

I travel on this line fairly regularly. The bogs on these trains are often out of order or occupied by people fare-dodging. It was gone 10pm on a Saturday night, she’d been Christmas shopping with friends probably had a few drinks, felt the urgent need to be sick and, most likely in an effort to not vomit all over the vestibule area, stuck her head out of the window. At many hundreds of miles on that line she would have been perfectly OK, alas was incredibly unlucky to encounter a lineside tree.

Her parents have lost their daughter and some of you want to gloat about it? Shame on you.

TTmonkey

14,483 posts

185 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
Agree with you there mate. Some horrid people on this website.

StanleyT

599 posts

17 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
It ain't always a tree, sometimes there are physical objects close enough to do the job.

E.g. a "basher" was killed a couple of years ago nosying out the window.......

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3731132/R...

...so goes Stan Tonks for the grace of God, I remember the 1980s commuting from London to Sheffield on the HSTs having to stick ones head out the window to have a "crafty fag". The guard knew there was someone smoking on the night journeys as he saw the sparks from the ask flying past "but he didn't mind, reminded him of smokebox days". Then the Kings Cross fire happened and fines were fines and no more heads out the window.

gazza285

4,727 posts

146 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
oyster said:
gazza285 said:
oyster said:
What never ceases to amaze me on this website is how popular victim-bashing is.

I wonder how many of those people passing judgement based on warning signs, drive home every single day with no regard to the little round warning signs with a red outline?
Perhaps all those that ignore the warning signs are all dead as well.
The mature, grown-up response.
Ask stupid questions, expect stupid answers.

Digga

26,056 posts

221 months

Tuesday 15th January
quotequote all
TwistingMyMelon said:
Poor girl, we all make mistakes when we are young, I know I did that make me shudder now
Me and my mates used to cross the tracks of the West Coast main line, on foot, to get to a spot where we used to build rope swings over the canal. With the wind in the wrong direction, you could easily miss a train until it was on top of you. Daft, stupid things like that are those 'there but for good fortune' moments. We all do them, there is no superiority, explicit or implied in talking about natural selection.

TTmonkey said:
I get the fact that trees and bushes grow and might reach out and touch a train, thin little bushes and whips. But a branch large and strong enough to kill someone...? Wow. Seriously surprising that this could happen. If it’s that substantial that it causes her fatal injuries, then you’d think it substantial enough to damage a train window if the wind blows it into the path of the train?

I’ve only ever seen train lines where there is a good dozen feet clearance around where the tracks are. The rail companies usually seem very keen to descimate the fauna.

Utterly regrettable death of a young person, and a sad way to go.
It takes a bit more force to break the side window of a train, with a glancing blow, than it does to kill a human with a head strike. Unfortunately, we have not had sufficient time to evolve to survive the impacts at the speed motorised transport allow.

Brave Fart

544 posts

49 months

Tuesday 15th January
quotequote all
PurpleTurtle said:
It’s incredibly sad that a young girl has died in tragic circumstances, this is someone’s daughter FFS.

Pretty appalling that the assembled ranks of NP&E like to polish their superiority complex by posting about ‘natural selection’ and the like. Make you feel good about yourselves does it? Pricks.

I travel on this line fairly regularly. The bogs on these trains are often out of order or occupied by people fare-dodging. It was gone 10pm on a Saturday night, she’d been Christmas shopping with friends probably had a few drinks, felt the urgent need to be sick and, most likely in an effort to not vomit all over the vestibule area, stuck her head out of the window. At many hundreds of miles on that line she would have been perfectly OK, alas was incredibly unlucky to encounter a lineside tree.

Her parents have lost their daughter and some of you want to gloat about it? Shame on you.
Well said. Posters commenting about Darwinism or making a joke about this need to take a close look at themselves.