8.2 Milion living alone

Poll: 8.2 Milion living alone

Total Members Polled: 509

Living with Partner: 51%
Living Alone - In a relationship: 7%
Living Alone (Divorced): 5%
Living Alone: 28%
Living with Friends/Family/Housemates: 8%
Author
Discussion

S1KRR

Original Poster:

10,870 posts

160 months

Saturday 16th November
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According to the ONS 8.2 Million people in the UK are living alone.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/11/15/middle...


article said:
It rose from 6.8million in 1999 to 8.2million in 2019, with the majority of this increase driven by the growth in the numbers of men - predominantly aged between 45 and 64 - living alone (72.1%).
I'm not quite in that age bracket biggrin But

They put this down to various reasons. Men marrying at an ever later age. Divorces. Women don't rely on men financially so much etc. I would add that many guys don't want to get married, some even eschew relationships all together. I don't think it's because they cant pull, I get the impression they are content in themselves. And prefer to spend time doing their interests and hobbies. Or spending time with their mates in pubs, or doing activities without having to "check with SWMBO" before saying Yes to a weekend break in Munich/ Ibiza

As is often the way, the Japanese are way ahead of us. Again delayed or no marriage appears to be at the root.

https://www.rethinktokyo.com/Hitorigurashi-living-...

I would imagine PH is 95%+ Male.

Wondered if this was a fair reflection?

500 Miles

216 posts

174 months

Saturday 16th November
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Lucky bds

Ilovejapcrap

2,740 posts

60 months

Saturday 16th November
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The poll already run out, o line alone !

Sheepshanks

18,615 posts

67 months

Saturday 16th November
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Our road has about thirty 3/4/5 bedroom houses and not so long ago more than half od them had a single occupant, with two exceptions they were men. A few have died / left in the last few years and generally young families have moved in which has brught a bit life back to the road. The houses either side of me still have lone occupants, both blokes whose wives died of cancer some years ago.

Eric Mc

108,196 posts

213 months

Saturday 16th November
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Sounds awfully familiar.

g3org3y

14,238 posts

139 months

Saturday 16th November
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S1KRR said:
As is often the way, the Japanese are way ahead of us. Again delayed or no marriage appears to be at the root.

https://www.rethinktokyo.com/Hitorigurashi-living-...

I would imagine PH is 95%+ Male.

Wondered if this was a fair reflection?
I wouldn't hold up the Japanese situation as a positive. Quite a high suicide rate. According to Wiki 70% are men.

I remember from my psych rotation, being married is actually a protective factor for men's health (both physical and mental).

Lord Marylebone

8,838 posts

128 months

Sunday 17th November
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Interesting. I think it’s a perfect storm of many different factors:

People placing less value on rushing into finding a partner or getting married.

Increase in divorce rates.

Couples less willing to stay with together through ‘thick and thin’.

Having children later or not at all.

Busy lives and busy careers.

Not having time to meet a partner.

I know a few people 35-40 who have been with a partner maybe 10 years or so, but then separated before they had children, are now single aged late 30’s and almost can’t be bothered to go through the ‘hassle’ of meeting people again and moving in with each other, and so on.

fido

14,268 posts

203 months

Sunday 17th November
quotequote all
g3org3y said:
I remember from my psych rotation, being married is actually a protective factor for men's health (both physical and mental).
The phrase I believe is "can't live with them, can't live without them". I think it that's more acceptable for blokes to live together nowadays (not in a gay sense, i meant even as friends/companions) whereas not an issue for women.

Isaac Hunt

10,617 posts

159 months

Sunday 17th November
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g3org3y said:
I remember from my psych rotation, being married is actually a protective factor for men's health (both physical and mental).
I think I read somewhere it is the opposite for women.

My sister has lived alone for 30 years after her husband went off with another woman. She loves it and never feels lonely.

I live with my OH but like my sister I don't understand the feeling of loneliness. It depends on the individual and how willing they are to get involved in stuff.

Stay in Bed Instead

17,689 posts

105 months

Sunday 17th November
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Twice divorced.

Can't be arsed anymore to have to take all the crap that comes with a relationship.


Monkeylegend

16,858 posts

179 months

Sunday 17th November
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Three of them live in our close, the youngest 81, the oldest 90. Its like Last of the Simmer Wine round here, the silly old farts smile

DoubleTime

1,389 posts

90 months

Sunday 17th November
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I’ve always said I’ll do the married thing once and give it my best shot. If it goes tits up then it’s the single life for me but probably with a few girlfriends in the mix along way. Sounds like bliss now that I think about it laugh

Sheets Tabuer

15,192 posts

163 months

Sunday 17th November
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I live alone in a small village, the feeling of isolation can be crushing at times but I'm getting on for 50 and my god every woman you meet at my age are so high bloody maintenance with borderline personality issues.

There's a reason they're single!!

Really don't think I can be arsed anymore.

My dad lives alone too in a city in a really rough area, I'm thinking about getting him to move in with me, he's 70 might be nice for him to see out his years in a little village.

andyxxx

392 posts

175 months

Sunday 17th November
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My first thought was ‘how sad’

Of course many of those will chose to be living alone in which case they may prefer it.

Whenever I have lived alone, despite always having had an active social life, I didn’t like it.

av185

9,625 posts

75 months

Sunday 17th November
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Isaac Hunt said:
g3org3y said:
I remember from my psych rotation, being married is actually a protective factor for men's health (both physical and mental).
I think I read somewhere it is the opposite for women.

My sister has lived alone for 30 years after her husband went off with another woman. She loves it and never feels lonely.

I live with my OH but like my sister I don't understand the feeling of loneliness. It depends on the individual and how willing they are to get involved in stuff.
Thing is many looking from the outside in assume living alone automatically means being lonely. Especially for blokes who generally tend to have a smaller number of friends than women.

Nothing is further from the truth. And nothing is more lonely than a relationship living with or worse, being married to, the wrong person.

I was married for 15 years then divorced. Now live alone.

Have a girlfriend living 10 miles alone who I trust totally I see once in the week and most Saturday and Sunday evenings and we regularly go away together. But we like our own space and would not consider for one minute moving in together or getting married going down the 'bag for life' route lol as the magic would instantly be lost. She sees her mates regularly as do I and we have our own lives and interests which keeps things fresh. Trust is a big part of it I guess.

Perfect relationship imo.

Mercury00

3,535 posts

104 months

Sunday 17th November
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I've lived alone for four years. I enjoy having my own space, not having set meal times, being able to have naps whenever and wherever I like. I lived with my ex before living alone, and I don't think I'd ever do it again. Why would I live with someone and have to compromise on everything, when I can live alone and do as I please? smile

Hoofy

69,540 posts

230 months

Sunday 17th November
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When I was single, I rarely felt "alone". Unless you have social anxiety issues, you can always find new friends by joining a sports club or other society or could meet new people from Meetup.com. And then there's things like Facebook and even forums. The latter made me definitely feel like I was not alone even when I couldn't be arsed to go out.

FN2TypeR

6,462 posts

41 months

Sunday 17th November
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I'm thirty one and single, I live alone and have for two years. I don't have a problem with it and quite enjoy the freedom but both my work and social lives keep me busy and active, so I have few complaints. Prior to this I was in a seven year relationship, we lived together for around five and a half years.

I imagine that it would be far tougher for an older person who may be retired, with more spare time on their hands, particularly if money is tough or they have a small social circle, loneliness can be a terrible thing.

A Winner Is You

20,972 posts

175 months

Sunday 17th November
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I live by myself, it does have its downsides but then again I can live safely in the knowledge that my house and everything within it is 100% legally mine. My philosophy has been that I'd much rather be in a happy relationship than single, but I'd much rather be single than stuck in an unhappy or loveless relationship.

Dont like rolls

599 posts

2 months

Sunday 17th November
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Sheets Tabuer said:
My dad lives alone too in a city in a really rough area, I'm thinking about getting him to move in with me, he's 70 might be nice for him to see out his years in a little village.
A wonderful thing to do, it will be a lot of effort but the wonder of knowing he feels safe and cared for is a fine goal if you can make it work.

Well done Sir.