Best dehumidifier for in the car

Best dehumidifier for in the car

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Discussion

Technoholic

Original Poster:

307 posts

14 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
Hi all

My TVR has to live outside all year round which is normally fine but now we’re coming to this time of year, I’m suffering from a lot of condensation inside, partly due to the weather and partly due to the fact that I’ve not got it totally dry inside after some leaks (a job I need to do, if anyone can suggest something I can dry it out with easily hat would be great)

So I want to get some dehumidifiers to our inside the car. What’s the best out there that aren’t too expensive, and maybe that can be dried out and used again? I’d probably look to put 3 or 4 in there just to be extra sure so shouldn’t be too expensive either.

Also, what are people’s opinions of using those low powered sealed waterproof greenhouse heaters inside a car to keep it dry/dry it out?

Thanks

Scrump

6,833 posts

106 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
I used a greenhouse heater tube under my motorbike which sat in my unheated garage under a cover for a few years. I wired it via a thermostat and it worked well.
Not sure how effective it will be in a car, it will heat the interior (if it can heat a greenhouse) but will it have any effect on condensation? You would also need to run a power cable into the car which presumably would leave open a route for more moisture to enter.

Demelitia

88 posts

4 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
You can buy bulk silica desiccant on the internet.
Fill a Tupperware box with a load of tiny holes drilled in the lid and stick it somewhere in the car.
Once it starts to lose its effectiveness you can bring it in and dry it all out in a baking tray in the oven at something like 110-120c.

When out driving, as you’re a minute or so away from home, turn the heating all the way down, fan up high and open the windows.
This gets all the moisture you’ve been breathing out that’s held suspended in the warm air away and stops it from condensing on the windows as soon as they cool.

As far as drying it out is concerned, either a very long drive with the blowers and heat on full whack, windows cracked open, or borrow a proper house dehumidifier off someone on a dry day. Extension lead out in to the car, though a slightly open window.
Put a towel in the gap to make sure you’re only drying the air in the cabin.

Being mindful to always try park it in what little sun we get can also help.

Technoholic

Original Poster:

307 posts

14 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
Scrump said:
I used a greenhouse heater tube under my motorbike which sat in my unheated garage under a cover for a few years. I wired it via a thermostat and it worked well.
Not sure how effective it will be in a car, it will heat the interior (if it can heat a greenhouse) but will it have any effect on condensation? You would also need to run a power cable into the car which presumably would leave open a route for more moisture to enter.
I was thinking more from a drying it out perspective. But yeah I'd need to find the best way to get the cable out with the smallest gap, which could be hard

Technoholic

Original Poster:

307 posts

14 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
Demelitia said:
You can buy bulk silica desiccant on the internet.
Fill a Tupperware box with a load of tiny holes drilled in the lid and stick it somewhere in the car.
Once it starts to lose its effectiveness you can bring it in and dry it all out in a baking tray in the oven at something like 110-120c.

When out driving, as you’re a minute or so away from home, turn the heating all the way down, fan up high and open the windows.
This gets all the moisture you’ve been breathing out that’s held suspended in the warm air away and stops it from condensing on the windows as soon as they cool.

As far as drying it out is concerned, either a very long drive with the blowers and heat on full whack, windows cracked open, or borrow a proper house dehumidifier off someone on a dry day. Extension lead out in to the car, though a slightly open window.
Put a towel in the gap to make sure you’re only drying the air in the cabin.

Being mindful to always try park it in what little sun we get can also help.
Good suggestions, I will look into bulk silica and maybe hiring a dehumidifier. But will a dehumidifier actually draw moisture out of the carpets etc? I will use a wet vac to get the actual major wetness out but obviously the remaining water is going to be trapped in the carpet. I don't know how a dehumidifier could get that out?

eck c

318 posts

142 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
I don't know how bad your issue is but as an alternative you could try Reusable Silica Bags (for cars).
Loads of heavy duty ones for sale on Ebay,
Personally I've found them very effective.

Fonzey

994 posts

75 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
I've been gradually (over about 2 months now!) drying out the interior of our Clio after one of the drainage channels blocked and overflowed into the cabin behind the dash.

We started out with actual puddles, about 1/2" deep in each footwell. It went unnoticed as the car had been unused for about 5 weeks.

My routine is a case of replacing some big silicone sachet things daily, drying them out on the radiator in the house then replacing them before bedtime. These get rotated around each footwell and come out absolutely dripping the next day.

The removable mats also came out, got dried off in the house then replaced to soak up some more water - repeat. I'd also go out every few days and towel down the inside of all the windows which would be dripping with condensation.

Finally I drive it whenever I have an excuse to, heaters on full pointing to the footwell and windows open a crack for the duration of the drive.

Carpets are now dry to the touch, but if you push down on them you'll still get a slightly damp hand. Condensation is no longer an issue when we do have to dry it.

A wet vac would have shaved weeks from this process I'm sure, but it's the household third car - with me working from home and wife on maternity, so it's a bit of a spare part at the moment so no real rush!

designforlife

3,278 posts

111 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
big bag of this-



and a couple of these-



The refillable traps work better than the sealed bags, and you'll have the satisfaction of emptying them... useful round the house too, i have a few on the go this time of year.

Technoholic

Original Poster:

307 posts

14 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
designforlife said:
big bag of this-



and a couple of these-



The refillable traps work better than the sealed bags, and you'll have the satisfaction of emptying them... useful round the house too, i have a few on the go this time of year.
Are these different to silica beads in a tub?

designforlife

3,278 posts

111 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
Different material (calcium chloride flakes), and have always worked better for me than silica.... will do a lot of good in a short time in a confined space like a car cabin.


Technoholic

Original Poster:

307 posts

14 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
Sounds good, I think I've used these before indoors, where I've had to empty a tub rather than dry beads out, and they always collected a lot of water.

Are these reusable or just need to be replaced when done?

designforlife

3,278 posts

111 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
I keep a big bag of the flakes in the kitchen and have a few of the two-part moisture traps that i refill... as long as they have the top part for holding the granules and the lower tub as two parts then you can re-use at your leisure, just tip some more flakes in there and drain as needed.


Technoholic

Original Poster:

307 posts

14 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
Thanks, these sound good. I just want to clarify, once the tub is full and needs emptying, does that mean the crystals also need replacing at the same time or can those crystals be "dried out" and reused?

designforlife

3,278 posts

111 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
The crystals slowly dissolve as they absorb moisture, so they effectively disappear and need replacing.

However a decent sized bag lasts me 6 months or so and i have a few of the traps on the go

Technoholic

Original Poster:

307 posts

14 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
Ah ok perfect, I will get some ordered! Thanks

designforlife

3,278 posts

111 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
No worries, you've reminded me that i need to fill one up and stick it in the back of the car myself.

Back in my mx5 days they were a god send, that thing leaked and got mouldy at the drop of a hat and the moisture traps made a huge difference in keeping things relatively dry.

Demelitia

88 posts

4 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
If possible, take a trim piece off here and there, or do whatever you need to do to be able to lift the carpet and wedge it up to allow air underneath it.
It’s usually the sound deadening holding most of the moisture. If you can lift the carpet up you’re increasing the relative surface area by a massive amount, speeding things up greatly.
Recently had to do the same with my dads old Passat.
We found having a couple of old towels that had been dried to within an inch of their life in the dryer also helped when put on the footwells. Take them out and get them in the dryer again ready to go Straight back in.

foggy

886 posts

230 months

Tuesday 19th November
quotequote all
We have a cheapy dehumidifier in the airing cupboard that we use to finish off drying damp washing after it’s been outside for the day at this time of year. It drags litres of water out over a few loads and should do a great job drying a soggy car interior. Only issue is they’re less effective the colder it is (i.e. a car outside) but they do generate a bit of heat too so I’d expect it to do a great job over a day or two in an enclosed space.

Technoholic

Original Poster:

307 posts

14 months

Wednesday 20th November
quotequote all
Thanks all, I've just put 3 of the large moisture traps full of Calcium Chloride into the car. Don't know how long I can expect before I see any results but I'm hoping these will help.

Thanks

designforlife

3,278 posts

111 months

Wednesday 20th November
quotequote all
Technoholic said:
Thanks all, I've just put 3 of the large moisture traps full of Calcium Chloride into the car. Don't know how long I can expect before I see any results but I'm hoping these will help.

Thanks
Should notice them starting to fill up with water within 24 hours i reckon, let us know how it goes!