Tools you wish you'd bought sooner...

Tools you wish you'd bought sooner...

Author
Discussion

EggsBenedict

Original Poster:

1,786 posts

177 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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You know, you've done loads of work previously, and then you buy a tool that makes you think 'why didn't I just get one of these before?'

4 for me:

Swanson square: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B072MGXYYJ/ref=psdc_19... - so useful building sheds and the like

Impact Driver - my first one was a 14.4V DeWalt - don't know why i used a cordless drill for screwdriving so long, these are so much better

Plunge/Track Saw - I've got a Makita one. Just the right tool for cutting sheet material, but twice as expensive as a regular circular saw. I still should have bought one ages before i actually did. https://www.angliatoolcentre.co.uk/makita-sp6000j1...

Mitre Saw stand - did without one for ages, but this just speeds up work massively by holding timber at the right height and stopping stuff falling. Bought as I bought a new chopsaw, and thought 'sod it, i'll get a stand with this one' : https://www.toolstop.co.uk/metabo-ksu251-legstand-...

Berkshire bred

985 posts

78 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Not house diy technically, Brake caliper piston winder tool thingy. The amount of blood, pain and swearing got to much so I finally stumped up the £12.65 and bought one. Best decision ever.

boyse7en

6,861 posts

168 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Berkshire bred said:
Not house diy technically, Brake caliper piston winder tool thingy. The amount of blood, pain and swearing got to much so I finally stumped up the £12.65 and bought one. Best decision ever.
Same here. After years of using clamps/molegrips/bits of wood I was defeated by a rear calliper on my Alfa so bought the right tool for winding the pistons back. A few months later I stumped up to buy a proper kit with a large range of fitments as I found it so much easier.

On the DIY front, I think a slate ripper was a tool I should have bought much sooner.

guindilias

5,245 posts

123 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Cordless impact driver, definitely. It make undoing rusty bolts or seized screws a pleasure.

Berkshire bred

985 posts

78 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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boyse7en said:
Berkshire bred said:
Not house diy technically, Brake caliper piston winder tool thingy. The amount of blood, pain and swearing got to much so I finally stumped up the £12.65 and bought one. Best decision ever.
Same here. After years of using clamps/molegrips/bits of wood I was defeated by a rear calliper on my Alfa so bought the right tool for winding the pistons back. A few months later I stumped up to buy a proper kit with a large range of fitments as I found it so much easier.
I very nearly came a cropper when I tried using it on the rear of my mx5. Being an idiot I had done no previous research and although I own a Haynes for the car it was being used as a pad for the coffee mug.

Fast forward to me wrenching like fk on this new and innocent winder using all of my extensive list of naughty words and getting nowhere. Get supremely fked off with the car and non functional winder so throw it on the floor. Much to the amusement of the friendly mechanic opposite who duly (and cautiously, from 30 feet away) advices me that they wind in via an Allen screw on the back of the caliper. I shouldn't be allowed near cars.

B17NNS

18,506 posts

250 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Festool TS55.

madcowman

219 posts

121 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Fuel Pump removal tool. Nearly stabbed myself many times in the arm trying to use a pair of screwdrivers. https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00A9NKMME/ref=asc_df_...

feef

5,206 posts

186 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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impact driver rattle gun.

Johnnytheboy

24,498 posts

189 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Electric plane.

jas xjr

11,309 posts

242 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Obviously depends on what kind of jobs you do around the house. For me.it is an SDS drill

CAPP0

19,708 posts

206 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Lots of things but a recent one was an adjustable spanner with a mole-grip clamp on it - it's excellent, no more slipping off the nut or bolt head..

oilydan

2,030 posts

274 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Pickaxe
SDS rotary demolition hammer/drill
Kubota 7100, Front loader/rotavator/backhoe
Gripple kit
Profile gauge
Small chainsaw
Trench spade

I'm all for using the right tool for the job.

sparkythecat

7,929 posts

258 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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CAPP0 said:
Lots of things but a recent one was an adjustable spanner with a mole-grip clamp on it - it's excellent, no more slipping off the nut or bolt head..
I'm struggling to picture this.
Got a link?

biggiles

1,769 posts

228 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Proper wire-strippers. Only a tenner and they save loads of time.

frisbee

5,041 posts

113 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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sparkythecat said:
CAPP0 said:
Lots of things but a recent one was an adjustable spanner with a mole-grip clamp on it - it's excellent, no more slipping off the nut or bolt head..
I'm struggling to picture this.
Got a link?
Imagine a really bad photoshop of mole-grips with an adjustable spanner. But they actually exist!

sunbeam alpine

6,998 posts

191 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Mini digger nuts

Drumroll

3,823 posts

123 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Johnnytheboy said:
Electric plane.
Have used a couple but I find I don't really get on with them.

Caddyshack

11,085 posts

209 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Workshop ramps. It is soooo much easier to work on a car when you can safely push it up,in the air on a button. They were not cheap but jobs are so much easier and safer

ou sont les biscuits

5,187 posts

198 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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oilydan said:
Trench spade

I'm all for using the right tool for the job.
Are you at war with your neighbours?

Back on topic, two18v rattle guns. One hex bit, one ½ inch.

Contract Killer

4,384 posts

186 months

Friday 28th September 2018
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Concrete/steel nailer, soo much quicker for fixing electrical fixings, I now wonder how i used to manage!

https://www.its.co.uk/pd/800E-Spit-Pulsa-800E-Cord...