I got wood

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Discussion

Harry Flashman

Original Poster:

15,435 posts

210 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
I have an absolute load of wood to split and chop up. All oak and chestnut from my parents' house.

This looks like hard work, but at least my wood stoves will be fuelled for winter when civilisation ends after this pandemic. Worth hiring someone with the right equipment? And what is that? This does not look like a chainsaw job, and as I am a novice, I don't fancy that anyway. I like my limbs attached.

Pic below. Note shoe for scale. The shed behind is full as well, mercifully of smaller logs already cut to 400mm lengths. Oh, and this is one of five similar piles.

20200617_154857 by baconrashers, on Flickr




mikees

2,535 posts

140 months

NewChurch

206 posts

66 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
Buy one of These and spend 10mins every now and then chopping a few. Good exercise as well.

LeadFarmer

4,178 posts

99 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
You can easily split that yourself with a Fiskars axe, something like their X27. It's enjoyable work, split a few now and again when time permits, then let it dry. Stand one round on top of another, so when your axe goes through it doesn't go into the ground and hit a stone.

Harry Flashman

Original Poster:

15,435 posts

210 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
I need the exercise, so good tip chaps!

Mr Pointy

8,457 posts

127 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
Stand the log/s you are chopping in a old tyre, that way all the pieces don't go flying off.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2d2GTBga6I
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUIyX8HHwJ8

Bill

45,483 posts

223 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
NewChurch said:
Buy one of These and spend 10mins every now and then chopping a few. Good exercise as well.
nono

https://www.gransforsbruk.com/en/product/gransfors...

wink

A friend has the smaller one and it's lovely to use (or stroke biggrin).

guindilias

5,072 posts

88 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
Buy one of these, and just wiggle levers. Have the Flashman Jrs stack it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVOnuqsIQYk

jagnet

3,591 posts

170 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
The Fiskars X25 or X27 alone will deal with those but team the splitting axe with the Fiskars 8lb Builder's Axe to quarter larger, more stubborn rounds first and you'll get through them even faster. You can then get the correct splitting axe for your arm length and strength rather than go straight for the X27 because it's bigger than the others.

How to choose the right sized Fiskars axe video.

The Builder's Axe is all about brute force and isolates shock incredibly well. The splitting axe is more about precision. You could do the whole job with either but with both to hand it's a much more satisfying task.

smn159

8,426 posts

185 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
Bill said:
NewChurch said:
Buy one of These and spend 10mins every now and then chopping a few. Good exercise as well.
nono

https://www.gransforsbruk.com/en/product/gransfors...

wink

A friend has the smaller one and it's lovely to use (or stroke biggrin).
No need to mess about with that - you need a Log Rover

http://www.log-rover.co.uk


CO2000

3,076 posts

177 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
Harry Flashman said:
The average person spends.......biggrin

Hereward

2,970 posts

198 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
Already looks quite well seasoned. Does oak harden as it dries? In which case I think hiring a hardcore hydraulic splitter is the quickest and easiest solution.

Bill

45,483 posts

223 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
jagnet said:
The Fiskars X25 or X27 alone will deal with those but team the splitting axe with the Fiskars 8lb Builder's Axe to quarter larger, more stubborn rounds first and you'll get through them even faster. You can then get the correct splitting axe for your arm length and strength rather than go straight for the X27 because it's bigger than the others.

How to choose the right sized Fiskars axe video.

The Builder's Axe is all about brute force and isolates shock incredibly well. The splitting axe is more about precision. You could do the whole job with either but with both to hand it's a much more satisfying task.
I've just been out and tried that with my maul. Apparently it's both too long and too heavy. biggrin


This was very satisfying to build though.


jagnet

3,591 posts

170 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
Bill said:
I've just been out and tried that with my maul. Apparently it's both too long and too heavy. biggrin
hehe one day, one day. Some say that's only for those that can eat three shredded wheat.

Bill

45,483 posts

223 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
Frankly, anyone who can lift a 3ft 3kg maul with one wrist like that is a massive wker! biggrin

jagnet

3,591 posts

170 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
If they don't end social distancing soon Fiskars say they are planning on releasing the X29 axe laugh

Bill

45,483 posts

223 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
hehe

Simpo Two

75,680 posts

233 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
jagnet said:
The Fiskars X25 or X27 alone will deal with those but team the splitting axe with the Fiskars 8lb Builder's Axe to quarter larger, more stubborn rounds first... You can then get the correct splitting axe for your arm length and strength rather than go straight for the X27...The Builder's Axe is all about brute force...
AxeHeads - Chopping Matters!

Harry Flashman

Original Poster:

15,435 posts

210 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
The advice on this thread is excellent.

I am torn between buying axes (always going to be fun), and rigging up some sort of ridiculous pneumatic destructo-splitter, PH style.

Or both.

lost in espace

5,331 posts

175 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
I used an axe/maul for years, now have a hydraulic electric splitter. Using an axe will do your back in over time ask me how I know, and it is easy to injure yourself.