2021 Lawn thread

2021 Lawn thread

Author
Discussion

mercedeslimos

1,254 posts

138 months

Friday 25th June
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My lawn(s) are nothing special, and far too much to worry about some of the amazing stuff on this thread. Have a 125cc petrol mower for the heavy stuff, but as the fourth and fifth lawns are more than 75ft from the house, my lightweight electric one can't be used. Picked up one of the 40v Parkside ones in Lidl the other day. Once the grass has been cut it's a breeze. I already had the battery ecosystem already as I use a lot of their stuff and had the 4AH batteries for the impact wrenches etc. Does a nice job and the Mrs has no issue using it, whereas the petrol one she can't even start!

Granted, it's not amazing, but it mows nice and even and is good and light and has the mulching kit too. I'd have a Robomow but I'd have to have five of the damned things biggrin

dhutch

8,680 posts

166 months

Friday 25th June
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forrestgrump said:


Does give a nice result but doesn't half complain about it.

Bloody nice nice bit of lawn, thats for sure!

MrBarry123

5,708 posts

90 months

Saturday 26th June
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A bit of advice from the lawn maestros on here if you don’t mind…

We’ve just had a new lawn laid (90m2 so not very large) and whilst it’s never going to be of ornamental quality due to its likely use, I’d quite like it to look as decent as possible.

I’m tempted to subscribe to a local lawn care service who will do all the fertilising etc. for me unless it’s feasible that I can do it myself without getting into a pickle. Generally when I attempt even basic tasks around the house and garden, I cause more issues than I ever fix, so please bear that in mind.

I suppose my question is, for someone who’s a bit st at being useful, is a lawn care service worthwhile?

r44flyer

356 posts

185 months

Saturday 26th June
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I guess it depends entirely on your interest in it, whether you value your time more for other things and whether you've got money to burn.

If the lawn in brand new the best and easiest thing you can do to keep it healthy is cut it regularly. At least once a week.

If you want to go further the next step would be a rotary spreader (the smaller Scotts one is perfect and not expensive) and an organic fertiliser which will reduce the likelihood of over application and scorching if you're prone to such disasters. If too many weeds bother you, you can hand weed 90sqm if you can be bothered, or use a 4in1 product.

Use said spreader to overseed a decent quality seed in spring and autumn when rain is forecast afterwards for a few days.

All these jobs take 20mins and maybe £100 per year in materials. Or pay someone else to do it...

spikeyhead

13,123 posts

166 months

Saturday 26th June
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buy a lawn spreader and and whichever fertilizer is recommended in the lawnsmith diary

MrBarry123

5,708 posts

90 months

Saturday 26th June
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Thanks for the guidance both!

biggrin

dhutch

8,680 posts

166 months

Monday 28th June
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Sounds like good advice. And keep the mower sharp.

r44flyer said:
...next step would be a rotary spreader (the smaller Scotts one is perfect and not expensive) and an organic fertiliser
Does anyone here have the Earthway shoulder spreader that lawnsmiths sell? I've got a Scotts 'EasyGreen' rotary I paid a tenner for locally off marketplace and it works well, but I often wonder if the earthway would be easier in the long run. For fertiliser and overseeding.

https://www.lawnsmith.co.uk/super-shoulder-fertili...

forrestgrump

1,477 posts

160 months

Monday 28th June
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dhutch said:
forrestgrump said:


Does give a nice result but doesn't half complain about it.

Bloody nice nice bit of lawn, thats for sure!
Brand new turf that’s why, but hoping to keep it this way. New obsession, must be getting old. Further evidence I picked up a Mountfield Empress 16 mower and looking forward to winter so I can take it apart getmecoat

dhutch

8,680 posts

166 months

Monday 28th June
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forrestgrump said:
I picked up a Mountfield Empress 16 mower and looking forward to winter so I can take it apart getmecoat
Oh, nice. Is that the one with the rotary height adjuster?

My first mower (well, my parents mower 30y ago) was the 18" with the notched height adjuster.
Always loved the white handles, match white bowden cables, and the go-fast arrow down the side.
https://picclick.co.uk/Mountfield-Empress-18-Self-...

Daniel

DonkeyApple

41,797 posts

138 months

Monday 28th June
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Couldn't find a scarecrow so raided the Halloween box.


morfmedia

232 posts

196 months

Monday 28th June
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dhutch said:
Does anyone here have the Earthway shoulder spreader that lawnsmiths sell? I've got a Scotts 'EasyGreen' rotary I paid a tenner for locally off marketplace and it works well, but I often wonder if the earthway would be easier in the long run. For fertiliser and overseeding.

https://www.lawnsmith.co.uk/super-shoulder-fertili...
I have this one, it does seem to be a good spreader however personally if I were doing it again (and I think knowing you have a decent area) I'd get a broadcast wheeled spreader.

The main reason I don't like the shoulder one is it seems to often get it over your arms / shoes / clothes etc whereas the other ones are pushed further in front of you.

It is handy that it doesn't take up much space though!

Reminds me I have one of those Metabi Super Sprayers in the loft I need to start using..... Lightly scarified a few days ago and it looked brutal on the lawn due to the heat + dryness (forecasters were off by a few days on the rain). Some Agrigem 16-16-16 down and I'm hoping it will recover ok. Thinking of getting some iron down when I get a chance in a few weeks.

dhutch

8,680 posts

166 months

Tuesday 29th June
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morfmedia said:
I have this one, it does seem to be a good spreader however personally if I were doing it again (and I think knowing you have a decent area) I'd get a broadcast wheeled spreader.

The main reason I don't like the shoulder one is it seems to often get it over your arms / shoes / clothes etc whereas the other ones are pushed further in front of you.

It is handy that it doesn't take up much space though!
Mmm, fair. Ok for grass seen, but maybe less clever with fertiliser, and completely impossible with anything with iron in it.

forrestgrump

1,477 posts

160 months

Tuesday 29th June
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dhutch said:
Oh, nice. Is that the one with the rotary height adjuster?

My first mower (well, my parents mower 30y ago) was the 18" with the notched height adjuster.
Always loved the white handles, match white bowden cables, and the go-fast arrow down the side.
https://picclick.co.uk/Mountfield-Empress-18-Self-...

Daniel
That's the one. Very satisfying to use, my grass can't grow fast enough. Might go offer some neighbours a free cutting service.

Picked up a B&D scarifier yesterday to remove some thatch and soon to be killed moss on the weird little strip I shouldn't really care about outside the house. Any tips welcome. Figure overseeding should probably wait until September now?


dhutch

8,680 posts

166 months

Tuesday 29th June
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Love it. Mission creep.....

... I'm still trying to finish overseeding ours having startes the second stupidly dry April in two years, but I wouldn't recommend it. Too hot for polythene and hard to keep it moist any other way! If easier where there is existing grass to provide shade, but also hard to water a strip the shape well and the neighbors do give odd looks when you water you verge. Been there!

I would sort the moss with gentle raking and some iron, get some spring & summer feed on, and as you say, overseed in autumn, given it is already fairly green and even. If you want to spot-seed some patches, go for it.


Daniel

Dissident Dragon

98 posts

205 months

Thursday 1st July
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A bit of a salutory post that I can laugh about now but was gutted when it happened.

I've followed the lawn thread since I relaid it a few years ago. It's only small but I'm really proud of it. A couple of photos:





I have a fence at the bottom of the garden. Behind the fence is a row of trees in a gap about 12ft wide between my garden and the rear neighbours. Half of this space is mine and I have a gate in the fence to allow me to get behind to ensure the weeds/brambles/ivy are kept under control and don't encroach onto the garden side. I do this by cutting back and then liberally applying weedkiller.

I did this in a bit of a rush this year as we were going away for a few days and instead of starting at the far end and working back towards the gate, I started with the weedkiller the moment I entered. All good I thought and off to Devon for a lovely weekend camping.

When we got back this is what awaited:



Oh st!

Nothing for it, left it for a couple of weeks to allow the potency of the weedkiller to subside and cut each footprint out and replaced it with fresh turf:



Then lots of water and a lawn feed and here it is yesterday:



Phew! Won't make that mistake again.


Edited by Dissident Dragon on Thursday 1st July 11:19

dhutch

8,680 posts

166 months

Monday 5th July
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Which to me begs two questions

a) Why not move the fence 6ft further out, and have this strip as part of the garden?

b) If you cannot move the fence for some reason, why not opt for more sustainable maintenance?

Just cut them down rather than using a load of glyphosate.

spanner10

175 posts

16 months

Monday 5th July
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forrestgrump said:
That's the one. Very satisfying to use, my grass can't grow fast enough. Might go offer some neighbours a free cutting service.

Picked up a B&D scarifier yesterday to remove some thatch and soon to be killed moss on the weird little strip I shouldn't really care about outside the house. Any tips welcome. Figure overseeding should probably wait until September now?

Yes, for overseeding. In the meantime cut it regularly and gradually reduce the height of cut if you wish. Twice a week til end of August if you can be bothered, once a week thereafter, just taking a very small amount off will thicken the grass to the extent no other action may be needed. It really makes a big difference.

Leftfootwonder

1,090 posts

27 months

Tuesday 6th July
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I have quite a large patch of purple flowering weeds in my lawn. Google suggests they are called 'Selfheal', which I'd never heard of. It seems once they are in, they are almost impossible to eradicate - oh the joy! Anyway, I have gone crazy and decided to break every (summer) rule in the book by scarifying and re-seeding the area. As the weather has been cooler and wetter of late, I am hoping I'll get away with it!

dhutch

8,680 posts

166 months

Tuesday 6th July
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Leftfootwonder said:
I have quite a large patch of purple flowering weeds in my lawn. Google suggests they are called 'Selfheal', which I'd never heard of. It seems once they are in, they are almost impossible to eradicate - oh the joy! Anyway, I have gone crazy and decided to break every (summer) rule in the book by scarifying and re-seeding the area. As the weather has been cooler and wetter of late, I am hoping I'll get away with it!
Nothing wrong with patch/reseeding small areas, just have to keep it moist.

For a tiny area, just water daily, if a little larger I find horticultural fleece works well to reduce loses. It isnt as good at keeping the moisture in as polythene, and costs more, but doenst cook it in summer sun!

Plus as you say, we appear to have 10 days cool wet weather, so winner.

kentlad

1,047 posts

152 months

Wednesday 7th July
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Well, our mid size lawn project is starting to come on a bit. I seeded two weeks ago tomorrow & have gone from no grass whatsoever to this. Pretty pleased - patchy in places so need to add some extra seed but all this rain has been great!