Where to retire in the UK

Where to retire in the UK

Author
Discussion

roscopervis

108 posts

114 months

Thursday 17th June
quotequote all
moorx said:
roscopervis said:
monkfish1 said:
Assuming you are not welsh, how are you finding living there? Increasingly, im considering it.
I wonder what the locals at these places really think of people with retiring money moving there? This migration is terrible for the affordability of houses for the local people and most neighbour disputes are from incomers who either do things that don’t respect where they are or are upset when farmers do farming that doesn’t agree with their idea of a countryside idyll.

If anyone can’t tell, I’m not a fan of this.
I know this is a thread about where to retire, but since I responded to monkfish1's question, I thought I should clarify.

We did not retire here; I am still working full time (as I said, for the local NHS) and my partner works on our property. We currently survive on my salary only. The property we bought is not your typical retirement property, or one which most locals would be interested in buying - it's an old farmhouse with two converted barns (holiday lets) and 10 acres of land. We bought it as a business venture.

As for being 'incomers' who don't respect the countryside - we are both from rural/semi rural areas, with knowledge of farming, and a love for the countryside, particularly Wales. Fortunately, the few neighbours we have don't regard us as 'incomers' and have been very welcoming.

I understand your point, but don't tar everyone with the same brush please.
My point was specifically about people retiring moving to such rural areas. I have no problem whatsoever with people who move to work and contribute to the areas to which they move, especially ones who understand and also contribute to the type of area it is.


Unfortunately in my line of work I hear and see the ideas and questions from many retirees wishing to move to a rural area who clearly have no idea or respect for where they are thinking of moving to, don’t like being told they can’t do things on land that they want to own, even if nobody could see it, and for those that do move, they will, in many cases, quarrel with their neighbour.

What really winds me up is their long term inability to learn how to say the name of their house and or village and the almost inevitable name change to something like “Two Hoots” or “Monk’s Rest” with absolutely no logic or link to the original house name or the area. Hugely frustrating.

Over the longer term this has eroded and diluted the ‘indigenous’ local ideas and politics and essentially allowed parties that would not have any traction in these areas now having a voice and this in turn means that the natural politics and parties of the areas are now diluted. The retired incomers ideas and politics for the area is not the same as what the locals typically would like and the division grows.

As I said, workers who move to contribute is typically a good thing. Older people, whether we like it or not become a burden on the Local Authorities and NHS in those areas and their politics isn’t good for growth.

I know this won’t be a popular or even an opinion many could even empathise with. It is something that I have been involved in looking at in some detail as part of local plan’s and through personal interest. The view really is different from the perspective of the existing locals.

red_slr

12,917 posts

156 months

Thursday 17th June
quotequote all
Anyone thought about Lytham near Blackpool? A mate of mine raves about it as a retirement spot.

mike9009

5,212 posts

210 months

Thursday 17th June
quotequote all
roscopervis said:
My point was specifically about people retiring moving to such rural areas. I have no problem whatsoever with people who move to work and contribute to the areas to which they move, especially ones who understand and also contribute to the type of area it is.


Unfortunately in my line of work I hear and see the ideas and questions from many retirees wishing to move to a rural area who clearly have no idea or respect for where they are thinking of moving to, don’t like being told they can’t do things on land that they want to own, even if nobody could see it, and for those that do move, they will, in many cases, quarrel with their neighbour.

What really winds me up is their long term inability to learn how to say the name of their house and or village and the almost inevitable name change to something like “Two Hoots” or “Monk’s Rest” with absolutely no logic or link to the original house name or the area. Hugely frustrating.

Over the longer term this has eroded and diluted the ‘indigenous’ local ideas and politics and essentially allowed parties that would not have any traction in these areas now having a voice and this in turn means that the natural politics and parties of the areas are now diluted. The retired incomers ideas and politics for the area is not the same as what the locals typically would like and the division grows.

As I said, workers who move to contribute is typically a good thing. Older people, whether we like it or not become a burden on the Local Authorities and NHS in those areas and their politics isn’t good for growth.

I know this won’t be a popular or even an opinion many could even empathise with. It is something that I have been involved in looking at in some detail as part of local plan’s and through personal interest. The view really is different from the perspective of the existing locals.
Your argument is a bit like the second home argument, except retirees actually use local shops, use local builders, use local restaurants/ pubs, buy from local car dealers, fit kitchens, bathrooms, needs gardening services on a continual basis etc. etc. Funding for NHS is centrally funded and probably contributed more by the retiree over their lifetime. Retirees will live in the rural area in non-holiday times supporting the local economy.

We live in a global economy and whilst I respect local traditions and 'indigenous' ideas, I question how these communities would survive without migration of populations (both ways). I suspect migration would only occur out of these rural populations without the migration inwards. A downward spiral.

If the name of a house is really the crux to the argument - I think the point has been missed.

I am fully anticipating my kids leaving their birth county on the Isle of Wight and will encourage them to do so, if they wish.

phil_cardiff

5,349 posts

175 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
mike9009 said:
roscopervis said:
My point was specifically about people retiring moving to such rural areas. I have no problem whatsoever with people who move to work and contribute to the areas to which they move, especially ones who understand and also contribute to the type of area it is.


Unfortunately in my line of work I hear and see the ideas and questions from many retirees wishing to move to a rural area who clearly have no idea or respect for where they are thinking of moving to, don’t like being told they can’t do things on land that they want to own, even if nobody could see it, and for those that do move, they will, in many cases, quarrel with their neighbour.

What really winds me up is their long term inability to learn how to say the name of their house and or village and the almost inevitable name change to something like “Two Hoots” or “Monk’s Rest” with absolutely no logic or link to the original house name or the area. Hugely frustrating.

Over the longer term this has eroded and diluted the ‘indigenous’ local ideas and politics and essentially allowed parties that would not have any traction in these areas now having a voice and this in turn means that the natural politics and parties of the areas are now diluted. The retired incomers ideas and politics for the area is not the same as what the locals typically would like and the division grows.

As I said, workers who move to contribute is typically a good thing. Older people, whether we like it or not become a burden on the Local Authorities and NHS in those areas and their politics isn’t good for growth.

I know this won’t be a popular or even an opinion many could even empathise with. It is something that I have been involved in looking at in some detail as part of local plan’s and through personal interest. The view really is different from the perspective of the existing locals.
Your argument is a bit like the second home argument, except retirees actually use local shops, use local builders, use local restaurants/ pubs, buy from local car dealers, fit kitchens, bathrooms, needs gardening services on a continual basis etc. etc. Funding for NHS is centrally funded and probably contributed more by the retiree over their lifetime. Retirees will live in the rural area in non-holiday times supporting the local economy.

We live in a global economy and whilst I respect local traditions and 'indigenous' ideas, I question how these communities would survive without migration of populations (both ways). I suspect migration would only occur out of these rural populations without the migration inwards. A downward spiral.

If the name of a house is really the crux to the argument - I think the point has been missed.

I am fully anticipating my kids leaving their birth county on the Isle of Wight and will encourage them to do so, if they wish.
You make some interesting and good points.

I would say though that retirees typically do not contribute as much to an area economically as a family. Still, as you say, they're better in that regard than holiday home owners.

The NHS is centrally funded but not centrally controlled. If the disproportionate retiree population is utilising the health service, combined with a poor local population, then strain will be felt. This can lead to a view that the devolved health service is of poorer quality and the politics of the retiree surface.

As for migration outwards, the local school and university school leavers will see house prices rising, with few local jobs that match and will follow the coin. Would house prices rise as much without the retiree immigration? Probably not.

The house name issue isn't about the name of the house. It's about having a modicum of respect for the language and culture of the area you've moved to.

It's a thorny and emotive subject for myself, believing in a free market economically but also coming from rural West Wales.

ewanjp

79 posts

4 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
The cost of care to the retirees shouldn't be overlooked - we're currently paying 20k a year for at home care for my mum. That's money that is going directly into the local economy funding local care workers. I guess what i'm saying is that even when the retired look like they're not spending any money, they often are.

I'm 40 at the moment, but when i retire I fully intend to move to somewhere other than where I am now (small village in Berkshire) - probably north wales. If the argument is that people shouldn't be permitted to move away from where they are 'from' then I don't think that's very equitable, as where people are from is an accident of birth.

monkfish1

9,170 posts

191 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
roscopervis said:
monkfish1 said:
Assuming you are not welsh, how are you finding living there? Increasingly, im considering it.
I wonder what the locals at these places really think of people with retiring money moving there? This migration is terrible for the affordability of houses for the local people and most neighbour disputes are from incomers who either do things that don’t respect where they are or are upset when farmers do farming that doesn’t agree with their idea of a countryside idyll.

If anyone can’t tell, I’m not a fan of this.
I understand your point, but its no different here. Indeed, the reason im considering it. I cant afford what i want where i am and am, effectively priced out. Sure, its at a higher level, but the priciple is the same. Lots of people cashing in their London homes for a better house and way of life in the home counties.

If you move to somewhere and try and make it where you came from, you cant be surprised if resentment develops. I moved next door to a church. But i dont complain about the church bells. I respect that its there before me, and that people use it, as they have done hundreds of years. Not everyone is ignorant.


Edited by monkfish1 on Friday 18th June 14:31

monkfish1

9,170 posts

191 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
roscopervis said:
moorx said:
roscopervis said:
monkfish1 said:
Assuming you are not welsh, how are you finding living there? Increasingly, im considering it.
I wonder what the locals at these places really think of people with retiring money moving there? This migration is terrible for the affordability of houses for the local people and most neighbour disputes are from incomers who either do things that don’t respect where they are or are upset when farmers do farming that doesn’t agree with their idea of a countryside idyll.

If anyone can’t tell, I’m not a fan of this.
I know this is a thread about where to retire, but since I responded to monkfish1's question, I thought I should clarify.

We did not retire here; I am still working full time (as I said, for the local NHS) and my partner works on our property. We currently survive on my salary only. The property we bought is not your typical retirement property, or one which most locals would be interested in buying - it's an old farmhouse with two converted barns (holiday lets) and 10 acres of land. We bought it as a business venture.

As for being 'incomers' who don't respect the countryside - we are both from rural/semi rural areas, with knowledge of farming, and a love for the countryside, particularly Wales. Fortunately, the few neighbours we have don't regard us as 'incomers' and have been very welcoming.

I understand your point, but don't tar everyone with the same brush please.
My point was specifically about people retiring moving to such rural areas. I have no problem whatsoever with people who move to work and contribute to the areas to which they move, especially ones who understand and also contribute to the type of area it is.


Unfortunately in my line of work I hear and see the ideas and questions from many retirees wishing to move to a rural area who clearly have no idea or respect for where they are thinking of moving to, don’t like being told they can’t do things on land that they want to own, even if nobody could see it, and for those that do move, they will, in many cases, quarrel with their neighbour.

What really winds me up is their long term inability to learn how to say the name of their house and or village and the almost inevitable name change to something like “Two Hoots” or “Monk’s Rest” with absolutely no logic or link to the original house name or the area. Hugely frustrating.

Over the longer term this has eroded and diluted the ‘indigenous’ local ideas and politics and essentially allowed parties that would not have any traction in these areas now having a voice and this in turn means that the natural politics and parties of the areas are now diluted. The retired incomers ideas and politics for the area is not the same as what the locals typically would like and the division grows.

As I said, workers who move to contribute is typically a good thing. Older people, whether we like it or not become a burden on the Local Authorities and NHS in those areas and their politics isn’t good for growth.

I know this won’t be a popular or even an opinion many could even empathise with. It is something that I have been involved in looking at in some detail as part of local plan’s and through personal interest. The view really is different from the perspective of the existing locals.
As per my other post, the same is happening everywhere. Not just rural Wales.

monkfish1

9,170 posts

191 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
moorx said:
monkfish1 said:
moorx said:
juice said:
Vasco said:
Somerset might be a good choice. I don't know enough about the whole county but parts may be too expensive.
It's a big county, but has pretty much something to offer everyone. Quantocks and mendips for scenery, decent-ish beaches (baring in mind they're estuary facing) and lots of lovely countryside. We're in the Chew Valley and absolutely love it here. Equidistant between Bristol, Bath and Wells (Bristol for work and Bath...well for everything else !).
We have Wookey & Cheddar not far away and there's the lovely villages like Wedmore, Mells etc
It's a nice area of the world to put down roots...
Agreed. Mendips or Exmoor would have been my choice if we had stayed there, but we could get much more for our money in west Wales.
Assuming you are not welsh, how are you finding living there? Increasingly, im considering it.
No, neither of us are Welsh. We've been here 9 years now. Both of us had spent some time here previously on day trips, holidays, etc - myself particularly - though not necessarily restricted to where we finally settled.

We haven't had any issues settling in. OH can converse well with our main neighbour (farmer) as he worked for an agricultural suppliers/engineers previously. We don't have many close neighbours. Our local town is a really nice traditional market town, still with an active livestock market. Nice selection of independent shop and pubs. It was one of the things that convinced us to buy here. I work locally for the NHS. In my team, the English outnumber the Welsh, although most have lived here a significant length of time. Lots of English accents locally, too, and no sense of being 'outsiders'.

We are in Carmarthenshire, close (within a few miles) to the border with Pembrokeshire and Ceredigion. This makes it a great base for travelling to some really nice areas. I've recently rediscovered my love of mid-Wales too, which is somewhere we used to visit when I was a kid.

Learning a few words of Welsh - even if it's just how to say 'thank you' is very much appreciated in my experience.

We just couldn't have afforded a place like we have, in the setting we have, in many other locations. So all positive as far as I'm concerned.
Thanks for the insight.

bristolracer

4,601 posts

116 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
monkfish1 said:
I moved next door to a church. But i dont complain about the church bells. I respect that its there before me, and that people use, as they have done hundreds of yours. Not everyone is ignorant.
Some are

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-574411...

monkfish1

9,170 posts

191 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
phil_cardiff said:
You make some interesting and good points.

I would say though that retirees typically do not contribute as much to an area economically as a family. Still, as you say, they're better in that regard than holiday home owners.

The NHS is centrally funded but not centrally controlled. If the disproportionate retiree population is utilising the health service, combined with a poor local population, then strain will be felt. This can lead to a view that the devolved health service is of poorer quality and the politics of the retiree surface.

As for migration outwards, the local school and university school leavers will see house prices rising, with few local jobs that match and will follow the coin. Would house prices rise as much without the retiree immigration? Probably not.

The house name issue isn't about the name of the house. It's about having a modicum of respect for the language and culture of the area you've moved to.

It's a thorny and emotive subject for myself, believing in a free market economically but also coming from rural West Wales.
At the risk of repeating my earlier posts, this happens in most places. Would prices where i am in bucks have increased as much as they if so many people from London were not moving here? Probably not.

Would i be looking to move to Wales if i had the cash to stay here? Well, i possibly still would, but my wife certainly wouldnt.

monkfish1

9,170 posts

191 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
bristolracer said:
monkfish1 said:
I moved next door to a church. But i dont complain about the church bells. I respect that its there before me, and that people use, as they have done hundreds of yours. Not everyone is ignorant.
Some are

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-574411...
I know. Ignorant tts.

ARHarh

1,344 posts

74 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
monkfish1 said:
bristolracer said:
monkfish1 said:
I moved next door to a church. But i dont complain about the church bells. I respect that its there before me, and that people use, as they have done hundreds of yours. Not everyone is ignorant.
Some are

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-574411...
I know. Ignorant tts.
Had some incomers in a village local to me, complain on the local Facebook group, about the tractors driving past in the evening when they want to sit in their garden and enjoy the piece and quiet. They soon got shot down by the locals, not heard another word from them since. just imagine how they are going to feel when the farmer is muck spreading at the bottom of their garden.

monkfish1

9,170 posts

191 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
ARHarh said:
monkfish1 said:
bristolracer said:
monkfish1 said:
I moved next door to a church. But i dont complain about the church bells. I respect that its there before me, and that people use, as they have done hundreds of yours. Not everyone is ignorant.
Some are

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-574411...
I know. Ignorant tts.
Had some incomers in a village local to me, complain on the local Facebook group, about the tractors driving past in the evening when they want to sit in their garden and enjoy the piece and quiet. They soon got shot down by the locals, not heard another word from them since. just imagine how they are going to feel when the farmer is muck spreading at the bottom of their garden.
I do wonder about some peoples grip on reality! Its the countryside. Farming happens.

As well as a church, im only 3 miles or so from silverstone. Sometimes they have motor racing. Occasionally i can hear it.

Good to know your incomers piped down.

talksthetorque

9,161 posts

102 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
Been here about 6 years At a parish ( about 60 dwellings in total) meeting 3 years ago we were all asked about our opinions on the local landowner plans on filling in the gaps in the village with shalf a dozen houses
A survey was done by the ( utterly incompetent as it turns out) planning consultant. It identified the need for local housing in the are to be around six houses surprisingly, and the survey included our village and the one a mile and a half west of us.

When I asked why this village was included, and not the village a mile and a half in the other direction, everyone looked at me as if I had suddenly grown a second head and one was swearing and blaspheming whilst the other vomited on their pet dog.



phil_cardiff

5,349 posts

175 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
ewanjp said:
The cost of care to the retirees shouldn't be overlooked - we're currently paying 20k a year for at home care for my mum. That's money that is going directly into the local economy funding local care workers. I guess what i'm saying is that even when the retired look like they're not spending any money, they often are.

I'm 40 at the moment, but when i retire I fully intend to move to somewhere other than where I am now (small village in Berkshire) - probably north wales. If the argument is that people shouldn't be permitted to move away from where they are 'from' then I don't think that's very equitable, as where people are from is an accident of birth.
I don't think care home jobs are the kind of work that'll lift a local economy out of the doldrums. Better than no jobs at all though.

And I'm not blaming retirees for wider, more macroeconomic woes but I think it's right to acknowledge potential impacts.

phil_cardiff

5,349 posts

175 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
monkfish1 said:
phil_cardiff said:
You make some interesting and good points.

I would say though that retirees typically do not contribute as much to an area economically as a family. Still, as you say, they're better in that regard than holiday home owners.

The NHS is centrally funded but not centrally controlled. If the disproportionate retiree population is utilising the health service, combined with a poor local population, then strain will be felt. This can lead to a view that the devolved health service is of poorer quality and the politics of the retiree surface.

As for migration outwards, the local school and university school leavers will see house prices rising, with few local jobs that match and will follow the coin. Would house prices rise as much without the retiree immigration? Probably not.

The house name issue isn't about the name of the house. It's about having a modicum of respect for the language and culture of the area you've moved to.

It's a thorny and emotive subject for myself, believing in a free market economically but also coming from rural West Wales.
At the risk of repeating my earlier posts, this happens in most places. Would prices where i am in bucks have increased as much as they if so many people from London were not moving here? Probably not.

Would i be looking to move to Wales if i had the cash to stay here? Well, i possibly still would, but my wife certainly wouldnt.
That's true and I'm part if the problem in a way, moving from a city to a rural village now and helping fuel price rises. I've tried/have given something back though through voluntary work and have tried to integrate as much as possible. That's all you can ask for really.

Gary C

8,112 posts

146 months

Saturday 19th June
quotequote all
roscopervis said:
My point was specifically about people retiring moving to such rural areas. I have no problem whatsoever with people who move to work and contribute to the areas to which they move, especially ones who understand and also contribute to the type of area it is.


Unfortunately in my line of work I hear and see the ideas and questions from many retirees wishing to move to a rural area who clearly have no idea or respect for where they are thinking of moving to, don’t like being told they can’t do things on land that they want to own, even if nobody could see it, and for those that do move, they will, in many cases, quarrel with their neighbour.

What really winds me up is their long term inability to learn how to say the name of their house and or village and the almost inevitable name change to something like “Two Hoots” or “Monk’s Rest” with absolutely no logic or link to the original house name or the area. Hugely frustrating.

Over the longer term this has eroded and diluted the ‘indigenous’ local ideas and politics and essentially allowed parties that would not have any traction in these areas now having a voice and this in turn means that the natural politics and parties of the areas are now diluted. The retired incomers ideas and politics for the area is not the same as what the locals typically would like and the division grows.

As I said, workers who move to contribute is typically a good thing. Older people, whether we like it or not become a burden on the Local Authorities and NHS in those areas and their politics isn’t good for growth.

I know this won’t be a popular or even an opinion many could even empathise with. It is something that I have been involved in looking at in some detail as part of local plan’s and through personal interest. The view really is different from the perspective of the existing locals.
Part of the reason of moving to a more rural area and having a bit of land around the house, is that you don't have some moaning tt leaning over your fence complaining.

Ok, they might still lean over and complain, but the distance means you can't hear them smile

C70R

8,378 posts

71 months

Saturday 19th June
quotequote all
monkfish1 said:
moorx said:
monkfish1 said:
moorx said:
juice said:
Vasco said:
Somerset might be a good choice. I don't know enough about the whole county but parts may be too expensive.
It's a big county, but has pretty much something to offer everyone. Quantocks and mendips for scenery, decent-ish beaches (baring in mind they're estuary facing) and lots of lovely countryside. We're in the Chew Valley and absolutely love it here. Equidistant between Bristol, Bath and Wells (Bristol for work and Bath...well for everything else !).
We have Wookey & Cheddar not far away and there's the lovely villages like Wedmore, Mells etc
It's a nice area of the world to put down roots...
Agreed. Mendips or Exmoor would have been my choice if we had stayed there, but we could get much more for our money in west Wales.
Assuming you are not welsh, how are you finding living there? Increasingly, im considering it.
No, neither of us are Welsh. We've been here 9 years now. Both of us had spent some time here previously on day trips, holidays, etc - myself particularly - though not necessarily restricted to where we finally settled.

We haven't had any issues settling in. OH can converse well with our main neighbour (farmer) as he worked for an agricultural suppliers/engineers previously. We don't have many close neighbours. Our local town is a really nice traditional market town, still with an active livestock market. Nice selection of independent shop and pubs. It was one of the things that convinced us to buy here. I work locally for the NHS. In my team, the English outnumber the Welsh, although most have lived here a significant length of time. Lots of English accents locally, too, and no sense of being 'outsiders'.

We are in Carmarthenshire, close (within a few miles) to the border with Pembrokeshire and Ceredigion. This makes it a great base for travelling to some really nice areas. I've recently rediscovered my love of mid-Wales too, which is somewhere we used to visit when I was a kid.

Learning a few words of Welsh - even if it's just how to say 'thank you' is very much appreciated in my experience.

We just couldn't have afforded a place like we have, in the setting we have, in many other locations. So all positive as far as I'm concerned.
Thanks for the insight.
West Wales remains every bit as insular as I remember it.

phil_cardiff

5,349 posts

175 months

Saturday 19th June
quotequote all
C70R said:
monkfish1 said:
moorx said:
monkfish1 said:
moorx said:
juice said:
Vasco said:
Somerset might be a good choice. I don't know enough about the whole county but parts may be too expensive.
It's a big county, but has pretty much something to offer everyone. Quantocks and mendips for scenery, decent-ish beaches (baring in mind they're estuary facing) and lots of lovely countryside. We're in the Chew Valley and absolutely love it here. Equidistant between Bristol, Bath and Wells (Bristol for work and Bath...well for everything else !).
We have Wookey & Cheddar not far away and there's the lovely villages like Wedmore, Mells etc
It's a nice area of the world to put down roots...
Agreed. Mendips or Exmoor would have been my choice if we had stayed there, but we could get much more for our money in west Wales.
Assuming you are not welsh, how are you finding living there? Increasingly, im considering it.
No, neither of us are Welsh. We've been here 9 years now. Both of us had spent some time here previously on day trips, holidays, etc - myself particularly - though not necessarily restricted to where we finally settled.

We haven't had any issues settling in. OH can converse well with our main neighbour (farmer) as he worked for an agricultural suppliers/engineers previously. We don't have many close neighbours. Our local town is a really nice traditional market town, still with an active livestock market. Nice selection of independent shop and pubs. It was one of the things that convinced us to buy here. I work locally for the NHS. In my team, the English outnumber the Welsh, although most have lived here a significant length of time. Lots of English accents locally, too, and no sense of being 'outsiders'.

We are in Carmarthenshire, close (within a few miles) to the border with Pembrokeshire and Ceredigion. This makes it a great base for travelling to some really nice areas. I've recently rediscovered my love of mid-Wales too, which is somewhere we used to visit when I was a kid.

Learning a few words of Welsh - even if it's just how to say 'thank you' is very much appreciated in my experience.

We just couldn't have afforded a place like we have, in the setting we have, in many other locations. So all positive as far as I'm concerned.
Thanks for the insight.
West Wales remains every bit as insular as I remember it.
There's nothing in the posts you quoted that indicate West Wales is insular.

C70R

8,378 posts

71 months

Sunday 20th June
quotequote all
phil_cardiff said:
There's nothing in the posts you quoted that indicate West Wales is insular.
Christ.

Why did I write "insular"? Literally the opposite of the word I was looking for.

Must concentrate harder when replying!