I saved a bee today!

I saved a bee today!

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Ray Luxury-Yacht

Original Poster:

8,844 posts

185 months

Friday 25th June
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Warning - this is a 'cool story bro' and so not very interesting if you're not really into nature!

When I got up this morning, I found a 'fully-striped livery' bumble bee on my bathroom windowsill. I think it had come in yesterday, although I didn't see it. The poor thing was still alive, but barely. Not animated at all, even when gently poked.

I put a little bit of honey on a dish, and carefully lifted him onto the plate, near the edge of the blob of honey. He immediately extended his proboscis ( I think it's called ) and presumably began eating. It's little body was moving in and out, almost like a concertina! I was fascinated to see him up close, I loved his colourful fur, and his stubby little legs. He was a beautiful little creature.

After about 20 minutes of me not being sure if it was helping much, he suddenly withdrew from the honey, and started to preen his face and antennae with his front legs. He began to walk around the dish with some conviction, and stand tall, whilst buzzing his wings more and more.

I went outside holding the dish, and after some more buzzing he suddenly took off from the dish, and flew up and away over the garden wall at a hell of a pace!

I know this isn't a terribly exciting story to relate, but I wanted to share it because it gave me such delight to have helped a tiny little insect that was near death, to get back to his hive and hopefully continue where he left off before becoming trapped in my bathroom. With all the doom and gloom of Covid and politics, a little thing like this lifted my spirits like nothing else. I feel really fortunate to have had such a lovely affirmation with nature today.

Boosted LS1

20,204 posts

229 months

Friday 25th June
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It's a shame more on here don't share or understand your values.

My wife always picked up cold bees and fed them honey. Very docile and happy to be revived. It's very rewarding to do 'your bit' for nature and nature rewards given half a chance.

Of course many are to busy ripping up their gardens to park some stty bit of white goods up front, derr.

Ambleton

5,316 posts

161 months

Saturday 26th June
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Boosted LS1 said:
Of course many are to busy ripping up their gardens to park some stty bit of white goods up front, derr.
Or fake grass...

This year we've gone on a bit of a planting spree. Lots of lavender, sunflowers, foxgloves etc.

Our garden I'm sure to most looks overgrown and a mess but we have a lot of insects, bees, bugs, and frogs.

Especially earlier on in the year when our rosemary Bush was awash with blue flowers, it was always swarming with bees.

From what I understand bees suffer with dehydration so a rock pool feature that they can land on and have a drink is a great benefit to them.

Boosted LS1

20,204 posts

229 months

Saturday 26th June
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Some friends nearby trashed the rear garden and pond as it was a bit unruly. It all got covered in sand, slabs and some decking. Then the built a bar and hung up a plastic hedge. It's hard to believe but these people are real. They have no appreciation of the natural world as the disconnect is so huge.

So what was once a garden full of insects, birds,life and a pond that will have had frogs and maybe newts is now an area of fakery and useless from a wildlife perspective. It was a decent sized garden.

Tango13

6,391 posts

145 months

Saturday 26th June
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Ambleton said:
Boosted LS1 said:
Of course many are to busy ripping up their gardens to park some stty bit of white goods up front, derr.
Or fake grass...

This year we've gone on a bit of a planting spree. Lots of lavender, sunflowers, foxgloves etc.

Our garden I'm sure to most looks overgrown and a mess but we have a lot of insects, bees, bugs, and frogs.

Especially earlier on in the year when our rosemary Bush was awash with blue flowers, it was always swarming with bees.

From what I understand bees suffer with dehydration so a rock pool feature that they can land on and have a drink is a great benefit to them.
I needed to re-seed some of the borders in both gardens when I moved here a couple of years back. I googled 'best seed mix for bees and butterflies' or something similar. I've given up trying to count how many bees I get of various species, some are tiny and some could take a fully grown cow hehe

Pothole

33,681 posts

251 months

Saturday 26th June
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Water is sufficient.

TR4man

4,372 posts

143 months

Saturday 26th June
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That is a lovely story - well done!

Turn7

20,413 posts

190 months

Saturday 26th June
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Well done for helping out !

I’ve used sugar water before to help them out.

Agree with Boosted, our wildlife is being ignored
And it can only bite us in the arse if we lose them all.

Ambleton

5,316 posts

161 months

Sunday 27th June
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Tango13 said:
I needed to re-seed some of the borders in both gardens when I moved here a couple of years back. I googled 'best seed mix for bees and butterflies' or something similar. I've given up trying to count how many bees I get of various species, some are tiny and some could take a fully grown cow hehe
just looked at similar things and we have virtually all the recommended plants already well established or on the way.

Some of them do rather take over, but the ground cover offered by the spreading geraniums is used extensively by frogs.

Previous

852 posts

123 months

Sunday 27th June
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Good for you OP!

We've saved a few this year - probably put in danger by us as they needed fishing out of my little lads paddling pool.

A good way to teach kids about nature.

Like others, I can't stand that fake grass carp, usually looks awful too.

Tango13

6,391 posts

145 months

Sunday 27th June
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Ambleton said:
Tango13 said:
I needed to re-seed some of the borders in both gardens when I moved here a couple of years back. I googled 'best seed mix for bees and butterflies' or something similar. I've given up trying to count how many bees I get of various species, some are tiny and some could take a fully grown cow hehe
just looked at similar things and we have virtually all the recommended plants already well established or on the way.

Some of them do rather take over, but the ground cover offered by the spreading geraniums is used extensively by frogs.
The borders have gone a bit mad this year, absolute riot of colours but they look good and the bees seem to like it so I see it as a win/win.

This years foxgloves could strike fear into the heart of a triffid which is pretty good as last year they did bugger all.

Not had any butterfies this year though, might still be a bit early for them?

rxe

5,445 posts

72 months

Sunday 27th June
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Sorry to be the nerdy one when it comes to saving bees. Please don’t feed them honey, ever. Feed them sugary water, and if necessary warm them up in a cupped hand (safe for bumbles, honey bees with thank you the a sting).

There are a whole load of diseases spread by honey, and you have no idea at all where supermarket honey comes from. There are frequent outbreaks of American and European foul brood near honey processing plants. Foul brood is nasty - turns the hives to goop inside, and the only real answer is to burn them.

Honey jars are the only recycling that I bother to wash - bees are very good at finding honey (as you’d expect), so when you lob out your (Chinese in all likelihood) supermarket honey, you’re possibly exposing them to disease.

Joey Ramone

2,106 posts

94 months

Sunday 27th June
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OP, I did exactly the same thing yesterday. Great to see.

BoggoStump

265 posts

18 months

Monday 28th June
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Yep as said, dont feed them honey, feed them sugary water.

I used to help them on their way with honey till i was told about it... like RXE said.

Use sugary water only.

BoggoStump

265 posts

18 months

Monday 28th June
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Great story though, i loved it.

Que the morons who would sstep on it or flush it own the toilet... ooo there busy shooting pigeons and other lovely birds at the moment.

Cliffe60

1,575 posts

5 months

Monday 28th June
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Great that you saved a ee. There so did I!

Swampy1982

2,684 posts

80 months

Monday 28th June
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Ahh, I love this story, thanks for sharing.

I took a picture of a bee the other day, dunno what compelled me to, but in the spirit if the thread I'll share it


generationx

3,930 posts

74 months

Monday 28th June
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Indeed that is a cool story Bro. I've done the same and, if out and about with no way to feed them if found on a path I'll at least help them to a safe place so they don't get stepped on.

We always have bee-friendly flowers in our garden.

Piersman2

6,227 posts

168 months

Monday 28th June
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I always pick up any struggling bees and put them in a flower so they can rest and get to the nectar. They'll usually crawl off whatever I've used to pick them up and cling onto a flower center. Hopefully it gives them somewhere to rest, recuparate and re-charge! smile

bristolbaron

3,159 posts

181 months

Monday 28th June
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I just wrote a long post but got logged out!

Basics - bee’s are great, this bush is AMAZING for them and birds. laugh