Should you be allowed to recline seat if big person behind?

Should you be allowed to recline seat if big person behind?

Author
Discussion

craigjm

9,795 posts

145 months

Tuesday 20th August
quotequote all
Personally I hate people reclining seats. I would be quite happy to see the ability to recline removed because shorter and shorter legroom over the years just makes it a total pain these days.

abzmike

1,380 posts

51 months

Tuesday 20th August
quotequote all
Seat back recline has minimal effect on legroom - more effect on headroom. Nobody likes the seat in front in your face - This is fixed by reclining your seat.

V10leptoquark

5,000 posts

162 months

Tuesday 20th August
quotequote all
Jarcy said:
Definitely reclining seats in economy should be banned, or the ability to recline removed.
I'd lay the blame on this issue in three parts:

(1) the airlines who stipulate that they must cram in 'x' number of seats in to such a small space thus creating the issues that passengers experience.

(2) the airports and "the system" are also at fault for providing alcohol and allowing passengers to enter confined areas whilst under the influence.

(3) the chavvy nature and careless attitude of many passengers these days who all have the attitude that they are "entitled" and as such its a case of everyone else can "f-off".

The solution to (1) and (3) could naturally aid each other ; fewer seats with more space would force up seat prices. Which in turn should price the chavs out of the market.
The solution to (2) should be self evident - stop allowing passengers to be under the influence before or on a plane.


untakenname

2,205 posts

137 months

Tuesday 20th August
quotequote all
Generally I find the seats more comfortable upright but if someone's being annoying behind (making excessive noise) then I'll constantly move it backwards and forwards until they shut up.

Pro-tip, if you fold over the inflight magazine and then roll it into a wedge and place it between the tray and the seat it prevents the person infront from reclining.
You can buy devices that do the same thing but if caught could possibly face consequences https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/aviation/11064259...

Integroo

5,669 posts

30 months

Tuesday 20th August
quotequote all
untakenname said:
Generally I find the seats more comfortable upright but if someone's being annoying behind (making excessive noise) then I'll constantly move it backwards and forwards until they shut up.

Pro-tip, if you fold over the inflight magazine and then roll it into a wedge and place it between the tray and the seat it prevents the person infront from reclining.
You can buy devices that do the same thing but if caught could possibly face consequences https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/aviation/11064259...
Why don't you turn round and speak to them rather than behave in a weird passive aggressive manner...

Coilspring

514 posts

8 months

Tuesday 20th August
quotequote all
Short haul, it's hardly worth it.

Long haul, it is a feature available, so can be used. Nothing wrong with using it.

Do those that complain about it not use the entertainment systems, or refuse the food provided ? If the person behind doesn't like it they should book different seats. If you book in cattle class then you know the seats are close and can recline. Purchase your seat accordingly.

For the record, any flight over 2 hours and I WILL recline my seat, for my comfort. The person in front can do as they please, as can the person behind. Last flight back from the USA I had a very disgruntled woman who muttered loudly about my seat being reclined. So what? I was not rude, offensive in any way, including hygiene (which is a much more serious issue on long haul) and had paid to sit where (we ) wanted to.

Complain to the airline about the seat features, or choose to sit where a reclining seat has no effect on you. Not to the person who is in the seat using the features, for comfort.

Its like sitting in a dining chair, or a settee for 9 hours. Which has a more comfortable sitting position ?

And how far does it actually recline? Not enough to stop anybody getting in or out of the seat behind, so in a sitting pisition it is hardly very far.

Edited by Coilspring on Tuesday 20th August 14:47

The Moose

18,492 posts

154 months

Tuesday 20th August
quotequote all
I took a quick look and it seems that it's sitting in the seat up against the toilet so the whale's seat can't recline.

bristolbaron

1,240 posts

157 months

Tuesday 20th August
quotequote all
Gemma shouted at the lady: 'What the f*ck are you doing, babe?'
Gemma then told the woman: 'Stop f*cking moving, stop f*cking moving, just leave it, it's fine.

a spokesman for Gemma told MailOnline: 'All Gemma did was like many passengers do in a busy air plane is ask for someone to be considerate to her. It was a gentle request and was in no way a row.'

Her spokesman should consider a career in politics laugh

chippy348

382 posts

92 months

Tuesday 20th August
quotequote all
I don’t recline as I think there is no room on most planes.

Which brings me to another point, I feel there is going to be crash that changes the space requirements (a bit like the Manchester fire changed the seat marital that can be used) I just think they are to crammed in together, unsafely in my opinion.

captain_cynic

5,061 posts

40 months

Wednesday 21st August
quotequote all
craigjm said:
Personally I hate people reclining seats. I would be quite happy to see the ability to recline removed because shorter and shorter legroom over the years just makes it a total pain these days.
I think airlines and seat designers are realising this.

It used to be a non issue but since the 90s we've lost 2-4 inches of leg space with 29" of seat pitch not being unusual these days air rage incidents are increasing as well as customer dissatisfaction.

Budget airlines are responding by buying seats with reduced recline or do not recline at all.

Premium airlines are investing in seats that have an articulating seat pan (layman's terms, it slides your arse forwards and angles slightly upwards) making the pivot point higher in the seat meaning the person behind retains leg and head room.

I've used these kinds of seats on Singapore long haul flights and they work out quite well for the recliner and the person behind as it doesnt steal space from behind and retains leg space for the recliner.

Also putting the argument to bed over who's space it really is.

El stovey

27,629 posts

208 months

Wednesday 21st August
quotequote all
abzmike said:
If I have a 10 hour flight, and the seat is able to recline, then I am going to recline it. Clearly with consideration, and I’ll pull up for meals. If you recline you will have the same amount of space as you did before I have.
No you don’t. Your shoulders might be the same distance away if you all recline but your lower body has less room.



The base of your seat doesn’t move.

Edited by El stovey on Wednesday 21st August 12:02

Europa1

8,786 posts

133 months

Wednesday 21st August
quotequote all
I generally don't mind if the person in front has the courtesy to ask before reclining their seat.

However, I find Gemma Collins such an unpleasant individual, I would be tempted to recline the seat as far, and as violently, as possible, without asking. Then every 20 minutes or so, go upright again for a while before repeating.

El stovey

27,629 posts

208 months

Wednesday 21st August
quotequote all
V10leptoquark said:
I'd lay the blame on this issue in three parts:

(1) the airlines who stipulate that they must cram in 'x' number of seats in to such a small space thus creating the issues that passengers experience.

(2) the airports and "the system" are also at fault for providing alcohol and allowing passengers to enter confined areas whilst under the influence.

(3) the chavvy nature and careless attitude of many passengers these days who all have the attitude that they are "entitled" and as such its a case of everyone else can "f-off".

The solution to (1) and (3) could naturally aid each other ; fewer seats with more space would force up seat prices. Which in turn should price the chavs out of the market.
The solution to (2) should be self evident - stop allowing passengers to be under the influence before or on a plane.
The airlines are all operating with tiny margins, they’d much rather everyone paid more for more leg room but passengers want the cheapest tickets. Flying is much cheaper now than it’s ever been, there’s massive overcapacity in the market.

The reason planes have little room is simply because passengers want the cheapest fares and book mainly based on cost. That’s why southwest and JetBlue and Ryanair and easyJet and Norwegian have transformed the airline industry.

It’s like complaining the highstreets are dead and that Tesco is a bit crap when you only ever shop in Tesco.

Mr Pointy

4,084 posts

104 months

Wednesday 21st August
quotequote all
El stovey said:
The airlines are all operating with tiny margins, they’d much rather everyone paid more for more leg room but passengers want the cheapest tickets. Flying is much cheaper now than it’s ever been, there’s massive overcapacity in the market.

The reason planes have little room is simply because passengers want the cheapest fares and book mainly based on cost. That’s why southwest and JetBlue and Ryanair and easyJet and Norwegian have transformed the airline industry.

It’s like complaining the highstreets are dead and that Tesco is a bit crap when you only ever shop in Tesco.
I think this is where the government should step in: no aircraft with a seat pitch less than 34" & 21" width should be allowed to land in the UK. That way all of the airlines are on a level playing field, it would be more comfortable to fly, ticket costs would go up, less people would fly, we wouldn't need a third runway at Heathrow & we'd save a load of carbon emmissions. Simples.

ghost83

3,180 posts

135 months

Wednesday 21st August
quotequote all
No offence to anyone but if I’ve paid for my seat then I do recline it

Zirconia

32,264 posts

229 months

Wednesday 21st August
quotequote all
abzmike said:
Seat back recline has minimal effect on legroom - more effect on headroom. Nobody likes the seat in front in your face - This is fixed by reclining your seat.
Depends on if your knees are already scrunched into the seat rear.

Never again through choice.

Ayahuasca

23,808 posts

224 months

Wednesday 21st August
quotequote all
If the person in front reclines, then I have no option but to recline. If the person in front doesn’t, neither do I.

What irritates me is those in the bulkhead row who recline and set off the whole chain reaction.

OscarIndia

1,008 posts

117 months

Wednesday 21st August
quotequote all
I'm 6ft 4 with very long legs, my knees are jammed up against the seat in front anyway, so if anyone reclines their seat I will politely ask them not to.
If they refuse then naturally both them and I are in for an uncomfortable journey.

captain_cynic

5,061 posts

40 months

Wednesday 21st August
quotequote all
ghost83 said:
No offence to anyone but if I’ve paid for my seat then I do recline it
You are the reason flying is terrible.

Personally I live flying, it's other people I can't stand.

And finally, the fact new seats are mostly either of limited or no recline or using articulated seat pans demonstrates it's not your space to take.

Coin Slot.

3,061 posts

108 months

Wednesday 21st August
quotequote all
tankplanker said:
If you paid for a particular seat then they also had the chance to pay for a seat with more leg room. Its their own fault if they are too tight to pay for the extra space when they clearly needed it.
Not true in every case, far from it. I always try and book the legroom seats, I'm happy to pay for the convenience. Unfortunately these seats aren't always available to book because they've been booked up by someone else or you simply don't get a legroom option when booking.

I'm 6ft 7", I need the legroom, there's simply not enough extra legroom seats on short haul and it seriously limits my ability to travel like a 'normal' person.

I have to fly business to get the legroom and I begrudge every bloody penny, even business can be tight on some airlines.