ADHD - Adults

Author
Discussion

anxious_ant

2,626 posts

82 months

Tuesday 19th May 2020
quotequote all
Woodrow Wilson said:
I'm not keen on taking drugs like that long-term.

I'm possibly "high-functioning" ADHD, if that exists.

Away from work, I'm mostly fine, even if i annoy my wife with my forgetfulness. I have done some good things and I enjoy myself. I'm quite flexible and can cope with changes of plan.

I'm currently reading "Journeys Through ADDulthood". It's quite interesting and I can relate to it. It is more about acceptance of who you are than trying to fix yourself.

Edited by Woodrow Wilson on Tuesday 19th May 20:24
I do understand that meds is not for everyone. I would go med free if I could. I've tried CBT but that didn't really help my ADD. It's helping with anxiety and depression though.

Good luck with the book!

filski666

3,843 posts

195 months

Wednesday 20th May 2020
quotequote all
yes, when I was at school I just got into constant trouble due to distractions - but I was more ADD than ADHD and in those days (1980s) it wasn't really a thing. My little brother was significantly worse coupled with Asperger's so he was diagnosed - then my parents re-visited my old school reports (I was at Uni at this time and struggling - eventually got kicked out) and realised the similarities, so I was tested and found to be ADHD/ADD.

I was put on dexamphetamine, went back to University, on a slightly more practical course (Automotive engineering at what used to be a Poly compared to Electronic Engineering at a "proper" University- and passed with distinction - such a huge difference knowing what was the problem and finding ways to work around it - the second University were great (Kingston) and after a chat with them about how they could help me, they made all exams with formula sheets as I struggle to recall complicated formula - and as I said, are we being tested on how to apply engineering theory or is this just a memory test. This was great as it was done for all, so it wasn't like I had special treatment.

After finishing uni and getting a job I do have times where it is hard - I stopped the dexamphetmine as it really isn't healthy for long term, and now I rely on Omega 3 EPA capsules which help a bit, and also trying CBD to see if it helps - the CBD has certainly helped with sleep which is a major problem for me as my brain is constantly prattling on and had to settle down, Now at knocking on door of 45 I have major sleep deprivation which is probably my biggest problem. Eating less processed food and lots of exercise help too I think, as when I am out training or competing with my dragonboating I feel a lot more calm.

Currently working from home due to covid-19 is a godsend, as I can easily get up and wander around as I get distracted and go back to work a few minutes later and it is no problem, spreads my working hours out a bit as I make sure my time on the job isn't suffering, but I think it works well, I have to try and avoid that at work in case people think I am slacking off all the time.


anxious_ant

2,626 posts

82 months

Wednesday 20th May 2020
quotequote all
filski666 said:
yes, when I was at school I just got into constant trouble due to distractions - but I was more ADD than ADHD and in those days (1980s) it wasn't really a thing. My little brother was significantly worse coupled with Asperger's so he was diagnosed - then my parents re-visited my old school reports (I was at Uni at this time and struggling - eventually got kicked out) and realised the similarities, so I was tested and found to be ADHD/ADD.

I was put on dexamphetamine, went back to University, on a slightly more practical course (Automotive engineering at what used to be a Poly compared to Electronic Engineering at a "proper" University- and passed with distinction - such a huge difference knowing what was the problem and finding ways to work around it - the second University were great (Kingston) and after a chat with them about how they could help me, they made all exams with formula sheets as I struggle to recall complicated formula - and as I said, are we being tested on how to apply engineering theory or is this just a memory test. This was great as it was done for all, so it wasn't like I had special treatment.

After finishing uni and getting a job I do have times where it is hard - I stopped the dexamphetmine as it really isn't healthy for long term, and now I rely on Omega 3 EPA capsules which help a bit, and also trying CBD to see if it helps - the CBD has certainly helped with sleep which is a major problem for me as my brain is constantly prattling on and had to settle down, Now at knocking on door of 45 I have major sleep deprivation which is probably my biggest problem. Eating less processed food and lots of exercise help too I think, as when I am out training or competing with my dragonboating I feel a lot more calm.

Currently working from home due to covid-19 is a godsend, as I can easily get up and wander around as I get distracted and go back to work a few minutes later and it is no problem, spreads my working hours out a bit as I make sure my time on the job isn't suffering, but I think it works well, I have to try and avoid that at work in case people think I am slacking off all the time.
I've been on Omega 3 for about nearly 2 years now and it definitely made a difference. I find it hard to have a good night's sleep - either I can't sleep or keep waking up. Omega 3 has improved my sleep quality.

Also have started CBD oil for about 8 months now. I only use it if I have work tomorrow as a boost to Omega 3. So far it is helping and also seem to ease my anxiety. Doesn't really address my ADD though as I take Concerta when I need to,

Exercise definitely helps as said. I just need to get my fat arse in gear wink

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Wednesday 20th May 2020
quotequote all
Do people tell others of their difficulties?

I tend to tell some people somethings i have difficulty with, and typically in a lighthearted way (some work tasks I really struggle with, especially details and prioritising) but other than with close relatives, I don't use the ADD ADHD terms.

anxious_ant

2,626 posts

82 months

Wednesday 20th May 2020
quotequote all
Sambucket said:
I certainly wouldn't recommend it to everyone... but... I find vaping a tiny bit of home grown weed before bed works wonders. Not enough to get you stoned. Helps sleep and seems to reduce symptoms the next day. I tend to do six months on, six months off, and can (self) report only positive effects. Doesn't impact on work or anything like that.

Though I'm open to the idea I just like getting slightly high.
Whilst I used to indulge in some herb in my younger years I have stopped since. Whilst there are benefits I find that it's a very thin line to overstep.

THC is calming but will completely rob me of any productivity I have left in my body biggrin

anxious_ant

2,626 posts

82 months

Wednesday 20th May 2020
quotequote all
Woodrow Wilson said:
Do people tell others of their difficulties?

I tend to tell some people somethings i have difficulty with, and typically in a lighthearted way (some work tasks I really struggle with, especially details and prioritising) but other than with close relatives, I don't use the ADD ADHD terms.
As an adult it's not too easy to have a conversation around ADD/ADHD without mentioning the name. I certainly wouldn't attempt this at work as it might be perceived negatively.

Ozzie Dave

566 posts

251 months

Thursday 21st May 2020
quotequote all
I use the term, "think differently" and can also use the term "get sidetracked easily while multitasking", catch alls that really mean nothing, but are great excuses.

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Thursday 21st May 2020
quotequote all
Ozzie Dave said:
use the term "get sidetracked easily while multitasking", catch alls that really mean nothing, but are great excuses.
Yes, I say similar. I doubt that many realise how difficult it can be to get going, and to keep going without wandering onto something else marginally more interesting and getting nothing done that you were supposed to....

It is very difficult to try to work from home whilst my children are at home, rather than at school. Distraction is bad enough without them wandering in, asking for help, IT support, fighting etc.

Like most children, they are not the best at sitting and getting on with work without supervision.

As my wife kindly pointed out: "Adults usually grow out of it and develop the ability to get on with things on their own, other than you"


Sa Calobra

37,592 posts

214 months

Wednesday 27th May 2020
quotequote all
There's a 18month wait for a formal diagnosis in my local authority.

I have a resting heart rate of around 44. That's because I've never been able to sit still. I exercise until I'm literally ground in to the ground. When Judo was open and I was injury free I'd go 4 times a week.

I find alcohol chills me out. Unless I drink spirits then I'm bouncing off the walls.

Mountain biking where you are processing countless roots, dips, drops,slides simultaneously also chills me out. I'd recommend this.

My mind is continually 'racing'. Certain aspects of my job my quirks really benefit. For instance driving through heavy traffic at high speed on blue lights is almost trance like.

I see it as having some great benefits and strengths but also I'm undergoing some exams at work and it reminds me that I can't sit in a packed room for three hours stock still.

I'm undergoing a formal diagnosis as I see some of the traits in my 10yr old son.



Edited by Sa Calobra on Wednesday 27th May 17:51

Sa Calobra

37,592 posts

214 months

Wednesday 27th May 2020
quotequote all
Anyone else run out of patience quickly at house parties and have to leave?

halo34

2,631 posts

202 months

Thursday 28th May 2020
quotequote all
Threads kicked off the need to go have a chat with the docs biggrin

unbound

24 posts

50 months

Sunday 31st May 2020
quotequote all
I had no idea I even had ADHD. I went in to get treatment for depression, mood swings, and issues with impulse control. My therapist then said I probably had ADHD.

Every therapist I saw previously said I must just be depressed and prescribed an SSRI, but my problems persisted.

Job38

1,968 posts

239 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
Timely and apposite; through this post have been on a similar journey, recently diagnosed adult ADHD, investigating next steps.

Has answered a whole lot of questions...!

Anyone benefitted from medication?

anonymous-user

57 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
Job38 said:
Timely and apposite; through this post have been on a similar journey, recently diagnosed adult ADHD, investigating next steps.

Has answered a whole lot of questions...!

Anyone benefitted from medication?
Yes I was an Concerta for a bit. Helps massively but as an adult, where does it end? I think it's useful to get out of a hole, but afterwards there are other ways to manage it. Diet, sleep, excercise, planning.

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
The medication route doesn't appeal, having briefly tried Concerta a few years ago and not really noticing an effect. It seems like a sticking plaster solution.

I've been looking into this a bit more recently as I am keen to finally find a job/career that I'm suited to... after 20-odd years of dissatisfaction, clock watching, middling under-achievement and a couple of job losses due to my struggles.

From Myers-Brigg (pseudo-science, admittedly) I come out as ENTP. This is often labelled "The Debater". Quite an uncommon type.

The descriptions on the pages below are very closely aligned with my personality.

https://personalityjunkie.com/entp/

https://www.crystalknows.com/personality-type/entp

One of them does say that "ENTP personalities are often (rightly or wrongly) diagnosed with ADHD".

The career suggestions are quite revealing in that they have reservations about most types of careers....

I do wonder where personality ends and ADHD begins.

I wonder if this sort of personality was of more use in previous, pre-historic/pre-industrial times. It is certainly not suited to full time, repetitive desk work with many rules and regulations.

What I do know is that my strengths are only occasionally useful at work (there have been some successes, which have been noted), but my weaknesses outweigh them in most of the roles I've had - articulacy has often meant that I've looked better than I am.

One of my strengths has come to the fore during lockdown: inquisitiveness and a thirst for knowledge mean that I've done very well in zoom quizzes against various different groups of people, many of whom are more successful in their careers....

Exercise keeps me sane - and in much better shape than most of my peers!

Edited by Woodrow Wilson on Wednesday 17th June 21:16

Job38

1,968 posts

239 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
quotequote all
Yes, not comfortable with 'for life' medication, having said that increasing use of alcohol to self-medicate probably more problematic.

All exacerbated by lockdown I've found...

OFORBES

533 posts

103 months

Thursday 18th June 2020
quotequote all
Sa Calobra said:
Anyone else run out of patience quickly at house parties and have to leave?
Yes - Pretty much in any situation. Doesn't matter where I am or what I am doing I am always on the move and get bored or fidgety quickly.

Si1295

375 posts

144 months

Thursday 18th June 2020
quotequote all
Ozzie Dave said:
However, have a look around and many people who excel in their profession have had it, not just in history but currently,just realise its not only a disadvantage and many have found it to drive their passions and careers forward. Use it productively and if you have a dozen things going at once, and discard 80% of them dont worry, its the 20% that becomes important.
Intelligence is defined as mental agility, make of that what you will.

Like others on here reading through some (O.K most) of the posts has had me nodding along. It may sound boring/tedious/treated like a child but I find planning my day down to the last task before sleep helps me to become massively more productive. The problem is turning it in to a routine, not doing it for a day/week and then stopping banghead

sparkyhx

4,169 posts

207 months

Thursday 18th June 2020
quotequote all
ADHD also has a strong link to Autism and some cross over, so also consider.

Doctors are generally poor at spotting this stuff or even 'suggesting'

Try the Wender Utah test which gives an indication of ADHD
https://www.scarboroughryedaleccg.nhs.uk/wp-conten...

AQ test for autism if anyone is interested
https://www.wired.com/2001/12/aqtest/

Both are indicative and NOT a diagnosis

Hugo Stiglitz

37,592 posts

214 months

Tuesday 28th July 2020
quotequote all
I have ADHD. I was on the waiting list for years, apperently the minimum wait at the moment is 5yrs locally.

I went private in the end.

I always saw my quirks as a bonus and a benefit but I had my coping strategies which was gym daily, cycling (alot) and alot of Judo in the last two years (I've gone from new person to blue belt). I've always been very intensive. Anything I pick up I absolutely focus on obsessively...but that's also partly something else..


Covid happened. I became a hamster spinning in a wheel. Fast, no direction.

Now I'm on Ritalin. I refuse to go a above 18mg.

How's everyone else coping? Live with it and any tips?