ADHD - Adults

Author
Discussion

sbarclay62

Original Poster:

648 posts

60 months

Wednesday 11th November 2020
quotequote all
Woodrow Wilson said:
I'm becoming increasingly frustrated. After being forced to work from home since March, the productive "work" part is becoming less and less of a feature, despite/because of the to-do list growing. I just cannot get going, there is no stimulation. Everything, including typing this, becomes a distraction.

Yes, I know I should plan, focus and complete tasks....

How are other people coping?

I don't want to take stimulants.
If its any consolation i'm not.

I went to the doctors back in Feb about this as I wanted to go back to college/uni and had concerns about my concentration levels and retaining information etc. I started a college course in September - loving the content but struggling massively as expected, probably even more so with it being learn from home. Still on the NHS Scotland Psychiatric waiting list. Expect I will be for some time yet... Covids fked me financially and now on minimum wage with some student loan so going private is out the question.

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Wednesday 11th November 2020
quotequote all
sbarclay62 said:
If its any consolation i'm not.

I went to the doctors back in Feb about this as I wanted to go back to college/uni and had concerns about my concentration levels and retaining information etc. I started a college course in September - loving the content but struggling massively as expected, probably even more so with it being learn from home. Still on the NHS Scotland Psychiatric waiting list. Expect I will be for some time yet... Covids fked me financially and now on minimum wage with some student loan so going private is out the question.
Sorry to hear that. I do have a reasonably well-paying job, so I can't complain about that -although I do worry about retaining it (for financial reasons, only, as I don't like it...).

A college course fills me with dread as I have memories of what happened to my studies at university, albeit many years ago now.

Well done for your efforts.

sparkyhx

4,171 posts

207 months

Wednesday 11th November 2020
quotequote all
Woodrow Wilson said:
I'm becoming increasingly frustrated. After being forced to work from home since March, the productive "work" part is becoming less and less of a feature, despite/because of the to-do list growing. I just cannot get going, there is no stimulation. Everything, including typing this, becomes a distraction.

Yes, I know I should plan, focus and complete tasks....

How are other people coping?

I don't want to take stimulants.
There are some behavioural techniques that can help, but unfortunately medication is often a game changer for many, nothing to be scared of and worth a try...... if it doesnt work you can always stop but if you never try.........

dhutch

14,533 posts

200 months

Wednesday 11th November 2020
quotequote all
sbarclay62 said:
Woodrow Wilson said:
How are other people coping?
If its any consolation i'm not.
Ditto, and speaking to a colleague he is suffering the same.

I arranged to go into the office one day a week, to help with this and which they offered, however with the four week shutdown that's also on pause again. So I have been in about four times in 6 months.



Daniel

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Wednesday 11th November 2020
quotequote all
dhutch said:
Ditto, and speaking to a colleague he is suffering the same.

I arranged to go into the office one day a week, to help with this and which they offered, however with the four week shutdown that's also on pause again. So I have been in about four times in 6 months.



Daniel
It's good to know that there are others in a similar position.

I have also only been 4 times in 7 months. My company doesn't encourage it, "business need only" and there would possibly be nobody else there now anyway.

cheers.

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Saturday 14th November 2020
quotequote all
sparkyhx said:
There are some behavioural techniques that can help, but unfortunately medication is often a game changer for many, nothing to be scared of and worth a try...... if it doesnt work you can always stop but if you never try.........
I did try for a short while, a few years ago, but I didn't notice any improvement -I was working in a particularly boring role at the time, though.

I'm not keen on becoming increasingly depending on stimulants.

I would like to be able to find work at which I could be successful without having to pretend to be interested in/dedicated to. I cannot derive any satisfaction/achievement from things that many people just do.

Hugo Stiglitz

37,594 posts

214 months

Saturday 14th November 2020
quotequote all
There's a Xaggitin XL 'bounce' - literally a huge upsurge in energy above my usual upsurge. I can see why its open to abuse. On the bike it gives me a surge in energy.

sbarclay62

Original Poster:

648 posts

60 months

Sunday 15th November 2020
quotequote all
For those of you diagnosed later in life, did you need counselling or anything once diagnosed? I'm only 31 so still young but still often get thoughts rattling around in my head of "what could've been". If i was diagnosed earlier i might not have fked up primary school, then properly fked up high school, then kinda fked up college, might not have picked chosen the wrong that i invested 10 years into then quit at the drop of a hat, might not have been looking to re-graduate at the age of 35 years old starting again etc etc. Having midlife crisis type thoughts alot lol.

I did have a laff with my mother. If i get diagnosed (i'm pretty sure i will) i asked her how the hell no-one noticed anything was up. "It was the 90s - in the estate - everyone was a bit loopy" laughlaugh

Hugo Stiglitz

37,594 posts

214 months

Sunday 15th November 2020
quotequote all
It is what it is. It wasn't a sudden omg. I've known all my life that I'm very impatient, hyperactive etc. Its been a great strength many a time. For instance I've been out mountain biking twice this weekend. I've ridden in the alps, Tenerife, Majorca, Scotland, Wales, Germany etc multiple times.

A late diagnosis just confirmed what I already knew.

My only regret is migraines and the one job that I wanted to do but couldn't because of it.

Heartworm

1,929 posts

164 months

Sunday 15th November 2020
quotequote all
I got diagnosed with adhd-combined a few weeks ago now. I was a tad surprised that I was diagnosed with combined as I hadn’t particularly noticed the hyperactivity part but those around me point out I’m incapable of sitting still for a whole film and in fidget constantly but my reason for going is just how disorganised I am, I’ve got stacks of paperwork that I’llm sort some day but it never seems to happen and my attention drifts between a thousand things. At work i was finding I’d be helping with everyone else software before getting on with my own, I’d return from work shattered.

I started on Elvanse yesterday, not sure if it’s made a difference, I definitely had more energy at the end of the day and I got a lot done, but that might just be because in didn’t plan everything that needed done.


Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Sunday 15th November 2020
quotequote all
anonymous said:
[redacted]
All good. If I could do that I wouldn't have the issues I do, though. It's day-in, day-out. Not a quick sprint


sparkyhx

4,171 posts

207 months

Monday 16th November 2020
quotequote all
Woodrow Wilson said:
anonymous said:
[redacted]
All good. If I could do that I wouldn't have the issues I do, though. It's day-in, day-out. Not a quick sprint
The trick is to make it really small chunks. Write this sentence, write that paragraph and build it up. If the task is 'too big' you will not do it cos you have the procrastination of starting and/or the disappointment of failure rather than reward of finishing. baby steps

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Tuesday 24th November 2020
quotequote all
sparkyhx said:
Woodrow Wilson said:
anonymous said:
[redacted]
All good. If I could do that I wouldn't have the issues I do, though. It's day-in, day-out. Not a quick sprint
The trick is to make it really small chunks. Write this sentence, write that paragraph and build it up. If the task is 'too big' you will not do it cos you have the procrastination of starting and/or the disappointment of failure rather than reward of finishing. baby steps
All good. Still tricky....

sbarclay62

Original Poster:

648 posts

60 months

Tuesday 24th November 2020
quotequote all
Found this podcast on ADHD with Adrian Chiles on the Guardian.

Worth a listen.

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2020/nov/13...

ATG

20,912 posts

275 months

Tuesday 24th November 2020
quotequote all
sbarclay62 said:
Can it be made better or more manageable?
Certainly was for a mate of mine in his early 40s. He'd done very well academically, successful career, etc in spite of it, but had ended up "self medicating"
with "non-prescription drugs" which got a bit out of hand, so he finally got himself in for an MOT and had ADHD diagnosed and treated. He said it was night and day. Like turning off the loud music playing in his head.

sbarclay62

Original Poster:

648 posts

60 months

Tuesday 24th November 2020
quotequote all
anonymous said:
[redacted]
I bought a wee dairy and a pen last week that goes with me most places now. Writing things down definitely works for me for day to day stuff. I do chuckle at it sometimes. Yesterdays dairy entries: "buy bagels", "watch Nae Pasaran (iplayer)", "iron work clothes" laugh

It's working though. Knowing I can just look at that helps the brain stopping going into super-overdrive.

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Tuesday 24th November 2020
quotequote all
sbarclay62 said:
Found this podcast on ADHD with Adrian Chiles on the Guardian.

Worth a listen.

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2020/nov/13...
Yes, I have listened to that. I can relate to much of it.

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Tuesday 24th November 2020
quotequote all
sbarclay62 said:
I bought a wee dairy and a pen last week that goes with me most places now. Writing things down definitely works for me for day to day stuff. I do chuckle at it sometimes. Yesterdays dairy entries: "buy bagels", "watch Nae Pasaran (iplayer)", "iron work clothes" laugh

It's working though. Knowing I can just look at that helps the brain stopping going into super-overdrive.
I do that, using electronic diaries/calendars, for my day to day life.

Work is just too much, though. Zero interest and endless boring crap. I start using a new planning/task management method: electronic, paper or white board, and then abandon it very soon afterwards.

Hugo Stiglitz

37,594 posts

214 months

Tuesday 24th November 2020
quotequote all
sbarclay62 said:
Found this podcast on ADHD with Adrian Chiles on the Guardian.

Worth a listen.

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2020/nov/13...
The last 6mins with the Professor were very good to listen to for me.

I personally don't 'understand' those who self medicate with pharmaceutical's be it illegal or legal. Throughout my life I've hated all medication with a passion. I do get the self medication with alcohol though sadly.

shirt

22,839 posts

204 months

Tuesday 24th November 2020
quotequote all
i was diagnosed with ADD earlier this year. the diagnosis was so accurate i cried when i got home. it didn't feel like a positive cloud lifting / realisation type moment. instead i dwelled on past mistakes and felt deep sorrow, shame and guilt. i'm learning to get past this now, slowly. i am 39.

the 'high functioning' comment rings true with me. i was a very bright child, i never studied for any exams yet never received less than top marks. i wasn't disruptive, the energy i had was largely mental, for which i had a lot of channels to deplete it. i was introspective, a dreamer and an adventurer. in retrospect, my school reports would have a common theme along the lines of 'very capable, if he chooses to apply himself' which i guess has continued ever since.

my career has been a series of adventures and misadventures. i tend to find that once i've mastered something i get bored of it very quickly. hence i tend to drift, literally doing nothing for days on end due to what feels like a physical inability to apply myself, then going into hyperfocus. i've made a lot of sideways career moves, very few upward ones. i am stellar when i apply myself, useless when i don't. my time keeping, organisation, anything to do with 'soft' skills are in total disarray. its a long running 'joke' that i arrive and leave the office 2 hrs later than everyone else.

i found my 'calling' has been in high pressure situations requiring lateral thought and authoritative decision making. i'm in a PMO role at present but spent a lot of time in the field prior to this, and by that i mean in war zones and other such desirable locations. i excel at pulling rabbits out of hats and spinning plates. i can be extremely eloquent and verbose on one hand yet crude and blunt on the other. i find it hard to work with people who are mentally slower than i am [which is often] and i find it hard to mask my emotions [my OH observes that i am dismissive of people i don't feel invested in]. these are great attributes for getting st done with no resources in the middle of nowhere but not so great now i'm trying to move away from field work to a more geographically stable senior position. luckily i have a couple of great heads of department who handpicked me for my current role as i am [their words] half friendly and half a complete bd. i told them about my diagnosis and they agree with it 100%. they give me a long leash, i try not to abuse that.

socially/personally i also find it to be have a lot of positives. i have a small group of close friends but these are people i feel genuinely connected to, some are like family. i am great at reading people, my imagination is limitless and i'm a great storyteller. however i can also be socially inappropriate and rude without intending it, i have poor self control and addictive tendencies, and frequently used to do things to my detriment just for the kicks.

i've struggled with depression and anxiety since my mid 20s and have undergone several periods of therapy which never worked. after the last severe episode i ended up with my current psychiatrist who initially diagnosed me with GAD for which we got quite far into treatment before hitting the ADD nail on the head. i'm currently being weaned off the anxiety meds and have been prescribed concerta for the ADD. some days it works perfectly and un-noticeably, others it mades me feel like i've had a crate of redbull and a bag of speed for lunch. i now take rivotril [a sedative] to balance this out. there's a limited range of pysch meds available out here so i'm on quite the cocktail. i absolutely hate having to buy a carrier bag full of happy pills every month. sometimes i get overcome with emotion, sometimes i have to hide away for a day or two. the pills are affecting my short term memory as i can go completely blank mid sentence and have zero recall around what i was saying or was about to say. this can be terribly embarrassing. my sympathies are with all of you who are going down the pills route.

i'm very lucky in that i have my OH in all of this. she really is a diamond and she's helped me a lot in dealing with it. she's a very practical person which is what i need, and i'm continually fascinated by her which is also what my mind needs. i hope we grow old disgracefully together.