ADHD - Adults

Author
Discussion

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Wednesday 19th June
quotequote all
TheBinarySheep said:
I've started to reduce the amount of external stimuli I'm getting as well in a attempt to spend more time with 'myself' and listen to 'myself'. The problem I've found with ADHD is that I've spent so many years frustrated with myself, and annoyed that I've not found any direction. Now my head is a little more clear and I can walk myself further down a given path then I could before, I don't know what path it is that I want to walk down. So now I need to reset, listen to myself and decide what I want and where I want to go, rather than relying on social media and other external stimuli to tell me where I should be going.

I found when I started meds that my taste in music changed, from dance music to country music. Now I like both and listen to them when I'm in different moods, but I listen to dance music less since taking meds than I ever have done in my life. I work at home, so I'm constantly listing to music whilst I work.

Any recommendations of the best place for CBT? I remember during titration they mentioned 'Access to work', but I think that was more about getting support/coaching at work rather than CBT.
Working from home (at a boring job) was terrible for me and possibly for many other people with ADHD tendencies.

I find a fast paced, stimulating, job suits me better than a sitting at home, documenting/reporting job.

TheBinarySheep

1,205 posts

54 months

Thursday 20th June
quotequote all
Woodrow Wilson said:
Working from home (at a boring job) was terrible for me and possibly for many other people with ADHD tendencies.

I find a fast paced, stimulating, job suits me better than a sitting at home, documenting/reporting job.
I found the opposite.

It's been a long time since I was employed, but I found myself always questioning authority, getting bored with tasks really easily, and neglecting my work to focus on something interesting that I was working out outside of work. I couldn't hold down a job longer than a year or two.

I went self employed back in 2006. It's given me the flexibility to be able to make my own decisions, and should I want to do something more interesting instead of work, I can. As deadlines are approaching, my brain has always kicked into action and I work evenings and weekends to make sure I get stuff done. In hindsight, going self-employed probably masked some of my symptoms, especially in the early years, as it put me in an environment where ADHD wasn't having as much of a negative impact and the creativity that comes with it has also helped me solve problems for clients. It's only in the later years where I started to struggling because so many years of working for myself, I felt I wasn't making any progress. Every time I started something I'd be super focused and excited, but after a short while I'd get bored and jump onto a new, fresh idea. I just simply couldn't stick with a single project for more than a few month. Since taking meds I've managed to build an app from start to finish, something I've never been able to do unless it was for a client.

At the minute, I'm going through a relatively quiet period at work, so I'm finding it hard to motivate myself on a day to day basis to do the work that needs doing, because I know I've got plenty of time to do it. This is where the meds really help me. When I'm taking them, and they're working, I'm able to sit down and start working on a task that needs to be done, even when there's no hurry to get it done. Once I start the task, that's it, I'm away, like a wind-up toy.

I think I'm finding that 36mg of Concerta XL with a 18mg top-up later in the day suites me best. Moving up to 54mg I've found that the benefits plateau and I don't really feel like they're doing anything.

I was taking 54mg and then an 18mg top-up, but whilst I wasn't experiencing any real site-effects like high blood pressure, jitterness etc, it just didn't feel like it did anything and I was starting to procrastinate more and have less positive thoughts.

Edited by TheBinarySheep on Thursday 20th June 10:42

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Thursday 20th June
quotequote all
TheBinarySheep said:
I think I'm finding that 36mg of Concerta XL with a 18mg top-up later in the day suites me best. Moving up to 54mg I've found that the benefits plateau and I don't really feel like they're doing anything.

I was taking 54mg and then an 18mg top-up, but whilst I wasn't experiencing any real site-effects like high blood pressure, jitterness etc, it just didn't feel like it did anything and I was starting to procrastinate more and have less positive thoughts.
I have found it quite difficult to determine the efficacy of the medication.

I have been working in a fairly fast paced job that throws up all sorts of situations daily. The routine takes often get pushed to the side/back of the queue along with forward planning type tasks that don't happen (it doesn't take much to discourage me from them...).

I have been taking 72mg of Concerta XL for a couple of years, which is apparently a big dose for most people.

No high blood pressure or heart issues (I have a low pulse, a BP at the low end of normal. I am physically fit), no issues sleeping, no suicidal thoughts etc.

At first I thought that coffee combined with Concerta made me a bit buzzy, and started on decaff for breakfast. Now, if do have a big caffeinated coffee in the morning, along with the medication, I do not notice any odd effects.

I do often get a bit of a crash in energy/oomph late afternoon/early evening for half an hour or so, and then bounce back, doing things all evening (I almost never watch TV). I rarely get to bed early enough.

I have stopped taking it at weekends and not really noticed any difference.

I must have an unusual make-up.

I could really do with some sort of close monitoring to determine the right medication or none.

sparkyhx

4,171 posts

207 months

Tuesday 25th June
quotequote all
My daughter has been without meds for a month now due to the Concerta supply issues, she's now had 3 separate prescriptions for 3 separate Methylphenadates now, all of them unavailable. She is really struggling.

TheBinarySheep

1,205 posts

54 months

Wednesday 26th June
quotequote all
sparkyhx said:
My daughter has been without meds for a month now due to the Concerta supply issues, she's now had 3 separate prescriptions for 3 separate Methylphenadates now, all of them unavailable. She is really struggling.
When I get my prescription, they always look on their system to see who has stock and send the prescription to them for processing. The longest delay I've had was a week, although one month I did have to have a generic brand of Concerta.

Anastie

164 posts

161 months

Wednesday 26th June
quotequote all
Looking at this thread to help educate me!

My 30 year old son is likely to have adult ADHD. He has not had a formal diagnosis and the GP has told him that there is a waiting list of two years for a formal diagnostic assessment.

His mum and I have a clinical NHS background (retired now) and although we never worked within this field. From what we have read he does tick every box. He was also told ,I have just learnt. That when he worked in the NHS they advised him to get assessed but he never shared this at the time and never bothered asking for an assessment.

He now works in the police and hopes they can refer him in for an assessment much quicker but we shall see.

I'm looking to be educated and to an extent reassured about this and the impact on his employment if any. How did you employers respond? I understand that ADHD can make some jobs more challenging and even unsuitable?

Ill read more of this thread later in the day as its quite long smile


PlywoodPascal

4,773 posts

24 months

Wednesday 26th June
quotequote all
I told my employer. It's caused me a lot of pain and not gained me much support beyond what I put in place myself (an admin assistant that I pay for). A lot of this is that there was/is no organisational expertise in how to accommodate people with ADHD (I had to work it all out myself, and then suggest/negotiate it. in part, that's inevitable because everyone is different in terms of how they are affected). my job is fairly complex and it's a very competitive field to be in (think ~20-30 positions in the whole country doing it).

However, I think the response is largely determined by two things i) aforementioned institutional preparedness for accommodating and 'getting the best' from neurodivergent people ii) the individuals (colleagues) around you. I have, through this process, had some amazing support from colleagues, but one of the colleagues who matters most, my direct line manager, has been at best unimaginative and incompetent, at worst they have been nefarious. I cannot tell.

Edited by PlywoodPascal on Wednesday 26th June 11:54

TheBinarySheep

1,205 posts

54 months

Wednesday 26th June
quotequote all
PlywoodPascal said:
I told my employer. It's caused me a lot of pain and not gained me much support beyond what I put in place myself (an admin assistant that I pay for). A lot of this is that there was/is no organisational expertise in how to accommodate people with ADHD (I had to work it all out myself, and then suggest/negotiate it. in part, that's inevitable because everyone is different in terms of how they are affected). my job is fairly complex and it's a very competitive field to be in (think ~20-30 positions in the whole country doing it).

However, I think the response is largely determined by two things i) aforementioned institutional preparedness for accommodating and 'getting the best' from neurodivergent people ii) the individuals (colleagues) around you. I have, through this process, had some amazing support from colleagues, but one of the colleagues who matters worst has been at best unimaginative and incompetent, at worst they have been nefarious. I cannot tell.

Edited by PlywoodPascal on Wednesday 26th June 10:34
Sadly, I think this is the core challenge we face. Our society is primarily structured around the needs and behaviours of neurotypical individuals. This framework often overlooks the unique strengths and potential of those who are neurodivergent, including individuals with ADHD.

Instead of recognising neurodivergence as a valuable difference, full of unique perspectives and talents, it is frequently seen through a lens of disadvantage. This perception can lead to significant misunderstandings and a lack of proper support for those with ADHD. The focus tends to be on the difficulties and challenges associated with ADHD, such as issues with attention, organisation, and impulsivity, rather than on strengths like creativity, hyper-focus, and problem-solving skills.

Many of the solutions simply aim to mask symptoms to allow individuals to conform to societal expectations, rather than utilising our strengths in situations where we're better suited.



Fastdruid

8,761 posts

155 months

Wednesday 26th June
quotequote all
On the subject of Brand vs Generics (specifically round Concerta) I thought this was an interesting nugget of information from https://www.additudemag.com/medication/concerta/

additudemag said:
Concerta is available in both branded and generic versions. This causes a great deal of confusion because there are currently six different formulations that are designated methylphenidate ER and that come in the same odd dosage strengths caplets, but only one of these is the authentic “branded generic” that is identical to the brand name Concerta. The other five products are quite inferior, and the FDA recently succeeded in downgrading two of these product’s quality ratings.

The marketer of the acceptable branded generic changes almost every year, usually in January. Consumers should ask their pharmacist which product they’re dispensing and should not accept substitutes for the authentic branded generic. The acceptable generics will be in the shape of a small barrel, have a dimple at one end where the medication is pumped out of the hard-shell caplet, and should still bear the name of the brand name manufacturer called ALZA. Any other products are likely to be highly inconsistent in their release of medication and, short in duration, but cheaper so that they will be preferred by pharmacy benefits managers. For further, regularly updated information, see the website www.adhdrollercoaster.org.
Now that is very heavily US skewed info but not knowing what the generics are its possible that they may very much be inadequate vs "real" Concerta.

PlywoodPascal

4,773 posts

24 months

Wednesday 26th June
quotequote all
The rules on generics is that the medicines as formulated should have 80 - 125% of the bioavailability of the 'reference product'. things like the physical form of the drug (how it crystallises), the shape of the tablet, the binders in the tablet, and of course the accuracy of the weighing of the ingredients all afect how much drug in the tablet and how much is absorbed once the tablet is in your body.

so it's no surprise that the effects can be different when you take the generic, you could have 20% less or 25% more of the active ingredient in your bloodstream than in the branded medication you are used to.

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Wednesday 26th June
quotequote all
PlywoodPascal said:
I told my employer
I have never mentioned it to any of my employers, although some noticed that some of my traits were not ideal for my jobs.

In reality, I'm not sure what I, or they, would be supposed to do with the information.

Neurodiverse just means a bit different in some aspect(s).

I now see it as "Can I do the job?" or "Can I not do the job?".

If I was spectacularly good at something, but also obviously very quirky, people may make allowances through choice in order to keep me and to benefit from my genius.

If a mostly fairly normal person has ADHD tendencies, what should an employer really be expected to do if somebody says that they are, for example, not good at concentrating on their work, planning, report writing, record keeping or following procedures? If the person is not actually good at much of the job that they are employed to do, then it is a bit unfair to expect the employer to suddenly respond to accommodate it.

The onus is probably really on the person themself to find/create a role that makes use of their strengths. This is not always easy in a society thay has become increasingly systemised and admin-heavy.

Likewise, it doesn't need to be brought up in every conversation or meeting as an excuse or reason for poor performance or poor communications with others.

Beating yourself over being unable to pass exams or to perform your job(s) well for 20-odd years because you think you should be able to is stupid.
-I know, because I did it.

Bottom line: Find a job that suits you better.



sparkyhx

4,171 posts

207 months

Wednesday 26th June
quotequote all
TheBinarySheep said:
sparkyhx said:
My daughter has been without meds for a month now due to the Concerta supply issues, she's now had 3 separate prescriptions for 3 separate Methylphenadates now, all of them unavailable. She is really struggling.
When I get my prescription, they always look on their system to see who has stock and send the prescription to them for processing. The longest delay I've had was a week, although one month I did have to have a generic brand of Concerta.
Doesn’t appear to be working where she lives, the dose has been a problem, with others available, but not hers. She finally got a confirmation of availability of a prescription for Concerta yesterday

p_k_n

190 posts

94 months

Thursday 27th June
quotequote all
Has anyone gone from Elvanse to Amfexa (Dexamfetamine)? I've been on Elvanse for over a year, and it has been great and still works well during the day. The problem is that over the past few months it has started causing severe insomnia. I think going from an extended release (Elvanse) to an instant release (Amfexa) medication may help.

sparkyhx

4,171 posts

207 months

Tuesday 16th July
quotequote all
Possible good news for younger people with suspected ADHD

https://www.theguardian.com/society/article/2024/j...

crofty1984

16,057 posts

207 months

Woodrow Wilson said:
I did try for a short while, a few years ago, but I didn't notice any improvement -I was working in a particularly boring role at the time, though.

I'm not keen on becoming increasingly depending on stimulants.

I would like to be able to find work at which I could be successful without having to pretend to be interested in/dedicated to. I cannot derive any satisfaction/achievement from things that many people just do.
That's an interesting statement at the end. I wonder if it's an all or nothing case with ADHD. I'm sure most people don't find their job massively interesting, but can fake it well enough, but with ADHD, if it doesn't meet that tipping point of hyperfocus then it's just not happening.

Woodrow Wilson

351 posts

163 months

Yesterday (18:42)
quotequote all
crofty1984 said:
Woodrow Wilson said:
...I would like to be able to find work at which I could be successful without having to pretend to be interested in/dedicated to. I cannot derive any satisfaction/achievement from things that many people just do.
That's an interesting statement at the end. I wonder if it's an all or nothing case with ADHD. I'm sure most people don't find their job massively interesting, but can fake it well enough, but with ADHD, if it doesn't meet that tipping point of hyperfocus then it's just not happening.
In the meantime I have found a job that provides quite a lot of interest, stimulation and days that pass by very quickly. I no longer detest work.

I do also now take stimulant medication at an apparently high dose (debatable effects, but probably does help with the admin/reporting bits that I still struggle with).

Unfortunately, the current job pays a lot less than my previous job (it takes the piss really).

Annoyingly, jobs that pay what I think I "should" be earning don't interest me, and I have turned down opportunities. I am not strong at the organisational, planning and document delivery stuff that this jobs do, so I am still at the job on low pay and not really sure what to do.

Edited by Woodrow Wilson on Tuesday 23 July 18:47

TheBinarySheep

1,205 posts

54 months

crofty1984 said:
That's an interesting statement at the end. I wonder if it's an all or nothing case with ADHD. I'm sure most people don't find their job massively interesting, but can fake it well enough, but with ADHD, if it doesn't meet that tipping point of hyperfocus then it's just not happening.
They say that those with ADHD have an interest driven brain. If you don't have any interest in what you're doing and you've got ADHD, you're going to really struggle. This is where the meds come in.

On the other hand, when you do become interested in something, you can become too fixated on it, at least for a couple of weeks. At the end of those two weeks you find you've ploughed all of your time, effort and money into it, neglected all of the things you should have been doing, and now you've lost interest and have found a new interest. Rinse, and repeat.

KTMsm

27,108 posts

266 months

crofty1984 said:
That's an interesting statement at the end. I wonder if it's an all or nothing case with ADHD. I'm sure most people don't find their job massively interesting, but can fake it well enough, but with ADHD, if it doesn't meet that tipping point of hyperfocus then it's just not happening.
As we've seen on this thread there is a wide variance in ADHD, I loved being a Site Agent, the days flew by, had the odd niggle with organisation but with a half decent system (paper back then) it was ok, helps that most Trades have ADHD (IMO)

I also enjoyed being a car dealer - buying, fixing, cleaning the cars

I need variety and to see the product of my labour, I couldn't do an office job


Motoring12345

642 posts

53 months

After 18 months I had a text from NHS asking me to complete a survey. The first question was if I still wanted to be assessed rofl

From my original letter, I'm estimated to be seen by May 2025 at the earliest so I'm hoping this "survey" is an indicator my appointment is soon.

lifeboat22

56 posts

36 months

TheBinarySheep said:
They say that those with ADHD have an interest driven brain. If you don't have any interest in what you're doing and you've got ADHD, you're going to really struggle. This is where the meds come in.

On the other hand, when you do become interested in something, you can become too fixated on it, at least for a couple of weeks. At the end of those two weeks you find you've ploughed all of your time, effort and money into it, neglected all of the things you should have been doing, and now you've lost interest and have found a new interest. Rinse, and repeat.
excellent summary