The worst book you have ever read.

The worst book you have ever read.

Author
Discussion

MC Bodge

15,448 posts

139 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
Genau said:
"The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" by Stieg Larsson. In my defence, I was in a foreign country so the English language section of the bookshop wasn't great.

Pages of tedious technical detail on word processors followed by rape porn with some half-baked leftie lecturing thrown in. It's a good thing the smug, fat bd is dead because his obsession with sexual violence would warrant a visit from Wallender or Beck. You can almost hear the pasty nonce licking his lips as he writes it.
It is an odd book. I couldn't understand why it was so popular.

Genau

33 posts

35 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
coppice said:
Just like that bloody Bill Shakespeare then , with his unhealthy appetite for murder, torture and rape. I rather enjoyed 'Girl with ' in fact, but as with many writers of that school , I suspect a one trick pony .
Shakespeare didn't stick several pages of intricate detail on the development history and inner mechanics of the Gutenberg press into the middle of Macbeth.

LordGrover

32,174 posts

176 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
1984

I know it's supposed to be a classic, but I've tried several times; first as a teenager, again mid-thirties/early forties and again earlier this year (now late fifties). Nearly made it to half way this time which is a record I think. It's just dull and depressing.

coppice

6,584 posts

108 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
Genau said:
Shakespeare didn't stick several pages of intricate detail on the development history and inner mechanics of the Gutenberg press into the middle of Macbeth.
Not much gets past you huh ?

MC Bodge

15,448 posts

139 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
LordGrover said:
1984

I know it's supposed to be a classic, but I've tried several times; first as a teenager, again mid-thirties/early forties and again earlier this year (now late fifties). Nearly made it to half way this time which is a record I think. It's just dull and depressing.
I read it at the age of Fourteen/Fifteen. I thought it was excellent and much of it stayed with me.

It is not supposed to be a rom com wink

paulguitar

Original Poster:

10,983 posts

77 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
LordGrover said:
1984
It's just dull and depressing.
Not sure if serious?



Genau

33 posts

35 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
coppice said:
Not much gets past you huh ?
You mean like you seizing on the sexual violence part of my original post to counter the whole post but ignoring the first bit when I mentioned Larsson's love of irrelevant detail? Yeah, I did notice that. It's such an old trick there's probably a Greek word for it.

I could go on to point out that Shakespeare might have loved a bit of punch up but he didn't go into excruciating torture porn detail. That would be like equating Nabokov's Lolita with Joop Wilhelmus's Lolita. Nabokov gets a bit too close to the edge but Wilhelmus goes over and does a backflip on the way down. It's not the same thing at all.

MC Bodge

15,448 posts

139 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
Genau said:
Larsson's love of irrelevant detail? Yeah, I did notice that. It's such an old trick there's probably a Greek word for it.
Michael Connelly often goes into great and unnecessary detail about coffee shops and eateries in the Hollywood/Van Nuys area. It does paint a picture of the area, though, and I'd like to visit to have a look.

Desiderata

499 posts

18 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
MC Bodge said:
A few claim to have liked it. Maybe my mind just doesn't work like Pirsig's.

For those who are curious, this is a very good summary
Loved the last line of that summary!!!

HJG

160 posts

71 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator

Genau

33 posts

35 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
LordGrover said:
1984

I know it's supposed to be a classic, but I've tried several times; first as a teenager, again mid-thirties/early forties and again earlier this year (now late fifties). Nearly made it to half way this time which is a record I think. It's just dull and depressing.
The parallels with today's society get so overdone it's starting to reflect badly on the book. Mention CCTV, some bright spark says 1984, everyone gets bored.

The really interesting parallel is not the surveillance state, it's the "'How many fingers am I holding up, Winston?" The authorities getting people to truly believe things that are patently untrue is a more important warning message.

I think I gave up on "Keep the Aspidistra Flying" but read most of the other novels. The Diaries suffer like most diaries from being one page of genius for every hundred pages of dullness and there is a limit to how much you can edit that away. Samuel Pepys and Kenneth Williams had the same problem.

paulguitar

Original Poster:

10,983 posts

77 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
HJG said:
Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator
redcard

MC Bodge

15,448 posts

139 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
paulguitar said:
HJG said:
Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator
redcard
It is a fair point. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is excellent. The sequel really is not.

techguyone

2,378 posts

106 months

Thursday 3rd December 2020
quotequote all
MC Bodge said:
paulguitar said:
HJG said:
Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator
redcard
It is a fair point. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is excellent. The sequel really is not.
What's wrong with Vermicious Knids?

biggrin

Miserablegit

2,184 posts

73 months

Wednesday 6th January
quotequote all
Sea Room - by Adam Nicholson

Gist- his father purchased the Shiant Islands in about 1937 from money he inherited - seems to be a continuing complaint that he didnt buy a street in Chelsea with the funds instead.

They appear a magnificent yet desolate place - a haven for seabirds and bugger all else - the only book i can recall having to force myself to read- seemed to be a page-by-page dirge on st weather, black cliffs and bugger all else. I found "The Worst Journey in the World" easier going and more lighthearted!




RizzoTheRat

20,540 posts

156 months

Wednesday 6th January
quotequote all
MC Bodge said:
Genau said:
"The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" by Stieg Larsson. In my defence, I was in a foreign country so the English language section of the bookshop wasn't great.

Pages of tedious technical detail on word processors followed by rape porn with some half-baked leftie lecturing thrown in. It's a good thing the smug, fat bd is dead because his obsession with sexual violence would warrant a visit from Wallender or Beck. You can almost hear the pasty nonce licking his lips as he writes it.
It is an odd book. I couldn't understand why it was so popular.
I gave up before I even got half way. My Mrs loved the whole series though.

The Hypno-Toad

10,577 posts

169 months

Wednesday 6th January
quotequote all
RizzoTheRat said:
MC Bodge said:
Genau said:
"The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" by Stieg Larsson. In my defence, I was in a foreign country so the English language section of the bookshop wasn't great.

Pages of tedious technical detail on word processors followed by rape porn with some half-baked leftie lecturing thrown in. It's a good thing the smug, fat bd is dead because his obsession with sexual violence would warrant a visit from Wallender or Beck. You can almost hear the pasty nonce licking his lips as he writes it.
It is an odd book. I couldn't understand why it was so popular.
I gave up before I even got half way. My Mrs loved the whole series though.
The first book was good. I thought the second was even better. The third was just conspiracy theories and a rambling obsession about Swedish biker gangs if I remember rightly. Awful.

OMITN

567 posts

56 months

Friday 22nd January
quotequote all
Miserablegit said:
Sea Room - by Adam Nicholson

Gist- his father purchased the Shiant Islands in about 1937 from money he inherited - seems to be a continuing complaint that he didnt buy a street in Chelsea with the funds instead.

They appear a magnificent yet desolate place - a haven for seabirds and bugger all else - the only book i can recall having to force myself to read- seemed to be a page-by-page dirge on st weather, black cliffs and bugger all else. I found "The Worst Journey in the World" easier going and more lighthearted!
I was just about to post that Cherry-Garrard’s feted account of that expedition is one of the dullest, most tedious things I have ever attempted to read (and I’ve read Dickens!).

I’m not much of a non-fiction reader but that finished my engagement with factual writing for 15 years. Even now non-fiction is approached cautiously and any sign of unending intricate detail gets short shrift.

Fittster

20,023 posts

177 months

Friday 22nd January
quotequote all
One Hundred Years of Solitude


They all have the same name!

toasty

6,217 posts

184 months

Saturday 23rd January
quotequote all
Fittster said:
One Hundred Years of Solitude


They all have the same name!
Good call, hugely irritating in what might been a good story.