Books - What are you reading?

Books - What are you reading?

Author
Discussion

lowdrag

10,600 posts

169 months

Friday 3rd January
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This is much more like it. "The Reunion" by Guilbert Musso. His books are intelligently written, and always grab me from the off, with sharp prose, good plots and keep you guessing. I'm not one too rush a book, savouring it and taking my time, but I realised I had read 75 pages in no time. The strangest part of this is that SWMBO loves them too, but the book, released last July, is only available in English. She is French as is the author! I'd strongly recommend any of his books.

droopsnoot

7,924 posts

198 months

Friday 3rd January
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I've just finished "Westwind" by Ian Rankin, a book that he wrote and published years ago but wasn't very successful. It's a pretty good book, a little dated in parts but he does warn in advance in the foreword. Not a waste of time by any means, though, a good story.

Chris Type R

5,195 posts

205 months

Friday 3rd January
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Bungleaio said:
I don't read many books but I had the urge to pick one up on the way home on Monday. I bought The family upstairs by Lisa Jewell, I did about 50 pages on the train home and then the rest of it today. It was a good read, slightly confusing with the different parts at the beginning but it soon started to knit together.

You might also enjoy "Then She Was Gone".

towser

571 posts

167 months

Friday 3rd January
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Just completed a few over the holidays.

The Lost Man by Jane Harper - I had really enjoyed her debut The Dry so thought I’d give this a shot. Not as good in my opinion, a bit laboured and fizzles out before the end. 6/10.

Reread The Hearts Invisible Furies by John Boyne as I’d enjoyed it so much the first time around. On second reading I enjoyed it less - too many contrived coincidences to make it sit well with me. Still a good book, but not the great one I’d initially thought it was. 7/10

Also reread Any Human Heart by William Boyd. I still view this as a modern classic. The audiobook version is fantastic. 10/10

Mudlarking by Lara Maiklem. Read on a whim as the premise seemed interesting. Basically a love story to the Thames and a nicely structured history of the river told through the eyes of a mudlarker (riverside treasure / relic finder). 8/10

A Little Hatred by Joe Abercrombie. Enjoyed his previous titles set in this world. This one didn’t grab me in quite the same way, the characters not quite as engaging and the pace too slow. It’s the first book of a trilogy so hoping the rest pick things up a bit. 5/10

The River by Peter Heller. Nuts and bolts thriller, readable but not memorable. 6/10

Just starting Scrubland by Chris Hammer. Another Aussie outback thriller. Apparently the genre is called Bush Noir - who knew! Promising so far.

Alias218

966 posts

118 months

Wednesday 8th January
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Started reading ‘On the Future’, by Martin Rees, over Christmas. Effectively an essay on the risks and benefits of continuing along our current path societally and technologically, providing analysis on what we might expect over the coming decades with regards to various subjects as energy production, climate, communications technology, space flight et al, and their potential for benefit or harm on a global and existential basis. Interesting stuff if you’re so inclined.

SistersofPercy

1,839 posts

122 months

Wednesday 8th January
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Having watched 'Mystify' over Christmas I've started to read:

Paula, Michael & Bob: Everything you know is wrong by Gerry Agar

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Paula-Michael-Bob-Everyth...

It's an old book, but the title is very much true and is revealing a side of all three I didn't know. I expected to go into it and hate Geldof but find myself warming to him. Paula and Michael on the other hand do not come across well.

I've added "michael my brother, lost boy of inxs" to my reading list when I've finished.

MC Bodge

13,732 posts

131 months

Wednesday 8th January
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I'm currently reading "Dead Man's Walk" by Larry McMurtry, a prequel to the fantastic "Lonesome Dove".

I'm really enjoying it. Something about the harshness of the Old West and the way the characters deal with it appeals to me, as a 21st century suburbanite.

Stan the Bat

5,617 posts

168 months

Wednesday 8th January
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'Catch and Kill' by Ronan Farrow. (Mia Farrow's son)


About the Harvey Weinstein saga.

matc

4,691 posts

163 months

Thursday 9th January
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Just finished ‘Bad Blood’ by John Carreyrou - about Theranos the tech company and the huge sham it turned out to be. I didn’t know anything about this before I read the book, but it’s amazing what actually happened. It’s currently being turned in to a film.

Worth a read IMO.

Stan the Bat

5,617 posts

168 months

Friday 10th January
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matc said:
Just finished ‘Bad Blood’ by John Carreyrou - about Theranos the tech company and the huge sham it turned out to be. I didn’t know anything about this before I read the book, but it’s amazing what actually happened. It’s currently being turned in to a film.

Worth a read IMO.
It's on my 'to read' list.

So many books, so little time.

marcosgt

10,579 posts

132 months

Wednesday 15th January
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Currently reading Adrian Newey's book How to build a racing car.

It's really well written and he explains some technical aspects really clearly.

Well worth a read if you're interested in motor sport at all.

M

j4r4lly

204 posts

91 months

Thursday 16th January
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Just finished "The Outsider" by Stephen King. Picked it up on holiday as I haven't read any of his stuff for years but thoroughly enjoyed it. Typical King, its somewhat far fetched in places but its' so well written, structured and paced and I always feel as if I'm chatting to someone rather than just reading. Very good.

Also read Sandrone Dazieri, "Kill The Angel" which is the follow up to "Kill The Father". Very fast moving and a twisty turney plot that keeps you engrossed. Interesting characters too as I found that most of them I didn't like and it paints a bleak picture of the political situation in Italy and the criminal justice system gets a pasting. Decent read though.

Perseverant

348 posts

67 months

Thursday 16th January
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After a few false starts I read "Wolf Hall " by Hilary Mantel, then followed it up with "Bring up the Bodies", the follow on novel. I found them gripping and a marvellous insight into the brutality of Tudor politics. I also enjoyed "Cold Mountain" recently and have been re-reading "Good Omens".

Chris Type R

5,195 posts

205 months

Thursday 16th January
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A jolly interesting read about ever-increasing precision over the last 300 odd years.

IanA2

2,467 posts

118 months

Thursday 16th January
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Perseverant said:
After a few false starts I read "Wolf Hall " by Hilary Mantel, then followed it up with "Bring up the Bodies", the follow on novel. I found them gripping and a marvellous insight into the brutality of Tudor politics. I also enjoyed "Cold Mountain" recently and have been re-reading "Good Omens".
I tend to read several books at a time. Currently pretty much half way through Mantel's trilogy which is fine. I prefer Sansom's seven volume scorcher. Whilst Mantel's writng is good, I think Sansom's grasp of the period is better, but then he is a Medievalist.

amongst others, I'm also re-reading the Red Sparrow trilogy, for the third or fourth time! Also Parade's End tetralogy, (for the second time), and Moby Dick, also for the second time, although the last time was forty years or more ago, Melville has an extraordinary force in his writing which I'm not sure I fully appreciated back then.

Plenty others did :-)




Edited by IanA2 on Thursday 16th January 18:41
Typos


Edited by IanA2 on Thursday 16th January 18:43

TheJimi

17,209 posts

199 months

Thursday 16th January
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How about that eh? I just started Wolf Hall two nights ago.

I've some Sansom stuff, and I've read the King'sbridge trilogy by Follett, so I'm curious to see how I feel about Mantel's stuff.

The Pillars Of The Earth is one of my favourite books.

Adam B

18,493 posts

210 months

Thursday 16th January
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towser said:
Craig W said:
Any recommendations for books that are fairly easy to read about different historical events? I know that's a very broad question...

Any subjects really as long as its engaging... the balkans, cold war, vietnam conflict, general US history, famous rulers from the past (Genghis, Mao, Stalin, whatever), british history pre-1900... really anything that is interesting.

Ta.
A few more readable ones that I've enjoyed over the years:

1) The Forever War by Dexter Filkins - focuses on the recent conflicts in the middle east
2) The Road to Kosovo by Greg Campbell
3) Eastern Approaches by Fitzroy Maclean - more of a "boy's own " tale but set within some interesting historical backdrops
4) Any of the Stephen Ambrose books on WW2 are very readable
5) The Great War For Civilisation by Robert Fisk - although it's a but of a daunting looking book it's a great read, once again focused on the middle east and the "War on Terror"
6) A Peoples Tragedy by Orlando Figes - on the russian revolution
7) The Cold War by Odd Arne Westad - a fairly dense subject but I found this very engaging
Most of the Anthony Beevor books are good, especially Stalingrad

cranford10

276 posts

72 months

Thursday 16th January
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Picked it up in the Kindle 99p sale before Xmas & can definitely recommend it.

Stan the Bat said:
matc said:
Just finished ‘Bad Blood’ by John Carreyrou - about Theranos the tech company and the huge sham it turned out to be. I didn’t know anything about this before I read the book, but it’s amazing what actually happened. It’s currently being turned in to a film.

Worth a read IMO.
It's on my 'to read' list.

So many books, so little time.

MC Bodge

13,732 posts

131 months

Thursday 16th January
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Adam B said:
Most of the Anthony Beevor books are good, especially Stalingrad
It is very good. The Berlin one made a big impact on me - atrocity after atrocity. The D-Day one is also very good.

I have the Spanish Civil war one to read and will read the Crete one.

K12beano

20,026 posts

231 months

Thursday 16th January
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Really surprised by what a good romp Baroness Orczy's The Scarlet Pimpernel turned out to be

“They seek him here, they seek him there, Those Frenchies seek him everywhere, Is he in heaven or is he in hell? That demned elusive Pimpernel”