Books - What are you reading?

Books - What are you reading?

Author
Discussion

TheJimi

20,208 posts

210 months

Thursday 22nd April
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havoc said:
DeejRC said:
Does anybody else read Darren Humphries and the Man From UNDEAD series?
How do they compare to Charles Stross' Laundry series...seem very similar concepts.
I've yet to read anything that beats either Rivers Of London, or The Dresden Files. I'd probably add the Alex Verus series as well.



IanA2

2,595 posts

129 months

Thursday 22nd April
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easytiger123 said:
The Way We Live Now by Anthony Trollope.

An absolutely brilliant novel, possibly the most entertaining and engrossing I've ever read. Highly recommended.
Yes, and 150 years later, Augustus Melmottes walk amongst us still....

coppice

6,738 posts

111 months

Friday 23rd April
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INSIDE STORY - Martin Amis. I am a long time Amis fan and I loved this book. Part fiction, part autobiography , with moving accounts of his long friendships with Saul Bellow and Christopher Hitchins . Reflections on good writing , insights and intrigue about his father Kingsley and Philip Larkin . Funny, moving , and stupendously well written . And lots more too - it is a very big book .

I enjoyed this more than anything else , from any genre , I've read in the last decade .

Prolex-UK

1,636 posts

175 months

Friday 23rd April
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Just finished John Sandford's Ocean Prey.

Great book brings lucas davenport into contact with virgil flowers.

read it in 2 days.

Now trying Scott Blade's Jack Widow series.

Not too bad so far. Jack Widow is Jack reacher's son............... Similar type of chap story rattling along nicely so far

unrepentant

20,348 posts

223 months

Sunday 25th April
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An interesting read.

irc

2,186 posts

103 months

Thursday 29th April
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Just read Semper Cool by Barry Fixler. His account of his time as a marine in Vietnam.

Good first hand account of the whole process. Joining , training, fighting. Numerous close calls. Not a work of literature just a simple readable account of a very lucky guy.

After the war his luck continued. No PTSD. Successful career in as a jeweller. When robbed at gunpoint in 2005 the marine instincts kicked in. He knocked the gun aside. Dived and got his own gun and shot both robbers. One injured. The other knocked over but saved by a bulletproof vest


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=X5g-4FtRCfc

lowdrag

11,543 posts

180 months

Thursday 29th April
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"Blood Salt Water by Denise Mina. This book was written by a person who twice won the Theakston Novel of the Year award and am left wondering if she had an off day writing this book or is the Theakston award a rather low key affair. For some reason I was left comparing it with those "Painting by Numbers" kits so beloved many years ago. I found myself thumbing forward to see how many pages before the end of the chapter before I could take a break. not at all inspiring frankly


andy_s

17,674 posts

226 months

Friday 30th April
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‘AstralCodexTen’ is running a book review competition at the moment, some very in-depth reviews (you almost don’t have to read the book...!) and an eclectic range in subject matter (from all of American history to why did we throw away books in order to ‘preserve’ them; from fictional starships to contract law)

Anyway, some inspiration perhaps:

Part1:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1xexFJ7h0vULMDE...
Part 2:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1M1m8o1HInGYJR3...

And the original link (see point 3) if mobile/laptop unfriendly - https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/open-thread-...


andy_s

17,674 posts

226 months

Friday 30th April
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IanA2 said:
easytiger123 said:
The Way We Live Now by Anthony Trollope.

An absolutely brilliant novel, possibly the most entertaining and engrossing I've ever read. Highly recommended.
Yes, and 150 years later, Augustus Melmottes walk amongst us still....
Got this for when I’ve finished ploughing through Mann, and Hobbes: a very short introduction - not sure I want to wade through Leviathan itself.

ElectricSoup

7,962 posts

118 months

Friday 30th April
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andy_s said:
IanA2 said:
easytiger123 said:
The Way We Live Now by Anthony Trollope.

An absolutely brilliant novel, possibly the most entertaining and engrossing I've ever read. Highly recommended.
Yes, and 150 years later, Augustus Melmottes walk amongst us still....
Got this for when I’ve finished ploughing through Mann, and Hobbes: a very short introduction - not sure I want to wade through Leviathan itself.
I was supposed to read Leviathan as part of a Philosophy subsid at University. I didn't. I failed the summer exam (38% when I needed 40%). I was summoned to the Philosophy Professor's office, and told either I attend summer classes and resit the exam, or, if I promised never to enter his Department again, he will "find" the extra 2% and pass me. Guess which option I took.

PomBstard

4,648 posts

209 months

Friday 30th April
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Desiderata said:
Re-reading Primo Levi's "The Periodic Table". I read it when I was younger and didn't think much of it, but am enjoying it this time. I think it's because I've got a bit slower and more patient with old age, it seemed that everything was getting dragged out and unnecessarily embellished with irrelevant details when I was younger but now think it's like having a conversation with an interesting old man. Lots of thought provoking stuff if you take the time to listen to what he's saying.
Having recently read If This Is A Man and The Truce, I’ve got this on the To Read list.

As a bit of light interlude, I’ve just gone through A Promised Land by Barack Obama. I do like reading his stuff, it’s simultaneously easy going and candid, yet full of information and educational. How did the US go from this to what followed??

Also, Billy Connolly’s collection of Tall Tales and Wee Stories is basically the stuff he’s been performing for decades, yet is still funny and written as dictated. Must be read with his voice in your head for full effect.

Lastly, just finishing Lenny Henry’s autobiography Who Am I, Again. Can’t figure this one out - it’s easy reading, and he’s trying to tell us stuff but it seems a bit scattered and loses focus. I used to like watching him in the 80s and his Live and Unleashed video was a regular on the screen in the post-pub hours. But this seems a bit untidy.

coppice

6,738 posts

111 months

Saturday 1st May
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I , too , enjoyed Obama's book - he writes beautifully , if not as well as he speaks . Watching the Trump car crash has piqued my interest in US politics , and I can highly recommend Jim Naughtie's On the Road , from Nixon to Trump and I am currently reading Jon Sopel's diary form Unpresidented - Politics , Pandemics and the Race that Trumped all others. It is very funny , and he doesn't hold back - and his targets aren't just in the GOP either.

DoctorX

5,429 posts

134 months

Saturday 1st May
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coppice said:
I , too , enjoyed Obama's book - he writes beautifully , if not as well as he speaks . Watching the Trump car crash has piqued my interest in US politics , and I can highly recommend Jim Naughtie's On the Road , from Nixon to Trump and I am currently reading Jon Sopel's diary form Unpresidented - Politics , Pandemics and the Race that Trumped all others. It is very funny , and he doesn't hold back - and his targets aren't just in the GOP either.
I listened to the audiobook version of Obama’s book. Even better as he reads it himself. Recommended.

DeejRC

2,377 posts

49 months

Monday 3rd May
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The Darren Humphries stuff is very different to Rivers of London. Both are extremely readable. I must admit though, this latest Ward book isn’t quite grabbing me as his previous ones did.

The Smith Novellas are well written and a bit of a departure from his normal stuff. I’m not a huge steampunk fan, so don’t compare them against anything. It’s more the Who/what Dunnit story writing that appeals.

For what it’s worth his Jessica Blackwood FBI series is excellent, as are the two Miami based Underwater Investigations books. Some great characters.

droopsnoot

8,818 posts

209 months

Monday 3rd May
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I've just finished "Typhoon Fury" by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison, a novel featuring the "Oregon" ship. A good read, I've had it sitting there for quite some time in a bag and had forgotten about it. I enjoy most of his stuff, maybe they're a bit formulaic but not too bad for it.

droopsnoot

8,818 posts

209 months

Monday 10th May
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I've just finished "A song for the dark times", the latest Rebus novel by Ian Rankin. Enjoyed it, as I usually do with his stuff. Two separate investigations, and Rebus sticking his nose in despite being retired.

RC1807

10,319 posts

135 months

Monday 10th May
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"SPIN SELLING" ... it's for work smile

griffin dai

2,927 posts

116 months

Monday 10th May
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Working my way slowly through a few military ebooks.

Duncan Falconer: First Into Action
Rusty Firmin: Go Go Go & The Regiment

^^^^ Pretty good, I’ve just downloaded Falconers novels to try.

And some books on the Falklands war:

Martin Middlebrook: The Falklands War and Argentine Fight for the Falklands. The Argentine book is well worth a read, tells the story from their perspective (started to feel a little sorry for the conscripts!!) most had no idea where they were going and had a pretty horrific time. Sad all round really.

Mike Norman: The Falklands War There & Back Again. The story of NP 8901 who held off the initial invasion.

Cedric Delves: Across an Angry Sea. SAS ops in the FW. Not bad but not great either.

Sir Lawrence Freedman: Vol 1 & 2 The Official history of the Falklands Campaign. Superb, both books! Easily the best books I’ve read on the conflict, hard going at times but if anyone’s interested in the Falklands war these are the ones to read.

Had to take a break from the Freedman book, vol2 is huge, but incredibly in depth. So started Blind Mans Bluff last week and I’m half way through. Submarine/Cold War book. Balls of steel this lot!!! Excellent read!!

lowdrag

11,543 posts

180 months

Thursday 13th May
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I have just finished "Repentance", the first novel of Eloisa Diaz. A very strange first book, telling the story of a police inspector of police and his life under the Juntas of 1981 and 2001. Translated into english rather well, but still using so many spanish expressions which either you guess or take time to look up. I chose the former. The book never mentions uncle or aunt, just tio and tia for example. It is an annoying book, one where at the beginning of each chapter it gives the date and time, and I was a few chapters in before realizing that one was 1981 and another 2001. To sum op, a good first effort, but she needs to improve.

griffin dai

2,927 posts

116 months

Thursday 13th May
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Slaughterhouse 5

WTH?? Can’t get into this at all confused