Books - What are you reading?

Books - What are you reading?

Author
Discussion

Goaty Bill 2

3,102 posts

73 months

Tuesday 17th March
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A Country Doctor's Notebook
Author: Mikhail Bulgakov
Introduction & Translation: Michael (Misha) Glenny - 1975
Published: Colins Harvill 1990
First Published: Colins & Harvill Press 1975

Stock photo (paperback)


A collection of short stories by Mikhail Bulgakov in the 1920s inspired by his experiences as a newly qualified doctor working in a village hospital.
Interesting to note that the early stories are pre-revolution and the final story (The Murderer) relates closely to his novel 'The White Guard'.
Having little to no knowledge or special interest in medicine, I nevertheless thoroughly enjoyed these bite sized stories. Each one short enough for a bedtime read before sleep but easily engaging enough to be read in a single long sitting.

Entertaining and, unusually for Bulgakov, without political motivation or the deeply allegorical style of 'Heart of a Dog' or 'The Master and Margarita'.
Bulgakov is his usual humorous self without making light of the seriousness of the plight of the people in his more desperate cases.


MC Bodge

13,210 posts

129 months

Tuesday 17th March
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Stedman said:


This was great.
It was interesting and a shocking at times, but you do need to remember that Mr Browder was trying to make a lot of money from the Russians when he went there. He wasn't a charity worker.

coppice

5,963 posts

98 months

Wednesday 18th March
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An excellent , meticulously researched and beautifully illustrated book about the tough American racer who secured Honda's first Grand Prix victory in Mexico in '65. Imagine the sound of a 13,000rpm 1.5 litre V12 ...

Ginther's life was a fascinating one and I really recommend the book to those interested in what is now an almost forgotten era .

My full review is on speedreaders.info

grumbledoak

25,706 posts

187 months

Thursday 19th March
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Just finished this:



It's good actually. Twelve short sentences with a chapter each of explanation and imagery and references to Solzhenitsyn and the Bible. I'll leave it in the pile and read it again.

droopsnoot

7,717 posts

196 months

Wednesday 25th March
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I've just finished "Deception Point" by Dan Brown, not a bad read but the title gives a pretty big plot spoiler.

coppice

5,963 posts

98 months

Thursday 26th March
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So does the name of the author, some might say...

droopsnoot

7,717 posts

196 months

Thursday 26th March
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Well, possibly. I haven't read much of his, the famous one was OK but "Digital Fortress" was rubbish. I've certainly read worse than Deception Point, and recently.

BryanC

683 posts

192 months

Thursday 26th March
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A cracking read, and only £3 from the Works.

The story of how the many items of art were removed from the Louvre in Paris to protect them from the ravages of war, but also to keep them out of the private collections of Himmler, Goring and Hitler. Much is written about the intervention of the Underground Maquis, and also the eventual re-occupation of Paris when the works were returned.

As much an exciting war story as a book on art history.
Strongly recommended.

RC1807

9,020 posts

122 months

Thursday 26th March
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Recently read the last 3/4 Michael Connelly "Bosch" novels, only the latest one to buy / read
I've now watched all 5 series of Bosch on Amazon Prime....

Started Stuart Macbride's "The Blood Road" yesterday. Finished it now.
Christ, there's some grim content in that .... Suicide, murders, child abduction / paedophile ring / selling children *shudders* ... Just as well the author chucks some character humour in there too, or I'd have stopped reading it. frown

unrepentant

19,963 posts

210 months

Thursday 26th March
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Just finished Churchill, Walking With Destiny by Andrew Roberts. Very good.

For lighter reading just started The Poison Garden by Alex Marwood. Her last 3 were great, this one has started well. Promises to be grisly.

droopsnoot

7,717 posts

196 months

Thursday 26th March
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RC1807 said:
Recently read the last 3/4 Michael Connelly "Bosch" novels, only the latest one to buy / read
I've now watched all 5 series of Bosch on Amazon Prime....

Started Stuart Macbride's "The Blood Road" yesterday. Finished it now.
Christ, there's some grim content in that .... Suicide, murders, child abduction / paedophile ring / selling children *shudders* ... Just as well the author chucks some character humour in there too, or I'd have stopped reading it. frown
Stuart Macbride is very good, have you tried James Oswald as well?

K12beano

19,799 posts

229 months

Friday 27th March
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Anyone else had a book sitting on their desk for a month, but even though we’re at the end of a couple of weeks WFH still not got started?


ElectricSoup

6,775 posts

105 months

Friday 27th March
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RC1807 said:
Recently read the last 3/4 Michael Connelly "Bosch" novels, only the latest one to buy / read
I've now watched all 5 series of Bosch on Amazon Prime....

Started Stuart Macbride's "The Blood Road" yesterday. Finished it now.
Christ, there's some grim content in that .... Suicide, murders, child abduction / ********** ring / selling children *shudders* ... Just as well the author chucks some character humour in there too, or I'd have stopped reading it. frown
On a similar tack I've read The Kindly Ones by Jonathan Littel. Only proceed with this one if you have a hugely strong stomach for grotesque (homo)s3xual practices. Very nearly gave up at a couple of points. I really don't see the need for such extreme detail and salacious description, it adds nothing to the narrative for me. I think I found my limit with this one.

(Had to amend some words to post this.)

CR6ZZ

1,313 posts

99 months

Friday 27th March
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A bit dated, but still crammed with lots of useful information.


MB140

2,289 posts

57 months

Saturday 28th March
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Laplace said:
Working my way through that at the moment, very good so far.

Recently finished Sniper One which was excellent. One of the best war related books I've read for getting a true sense of what our lads went through in Iraq.

Also recently finished both Jason Fox - Battle Scars and Ant Middleton - First Man In. Foxy has certainly been through the wringer and I was glad to read how he got through it in the end. Ant came across a bit of a cock imo.

Picked up a few more used books from ebay to work through which should keep me going for a month or so. All recommendations from this thread thumbup


Edited by Laplace on Monday 2nd March 21:01
If you like those sort of books (I do) then Ed Macey: Apache is a cracking read. It’s about all his tour in Afghan. But a portion is about the reduce of a British solider where they strapped 4 guys to the outside (yes outside) of an Apache. Flew them right in the stronghold of the taliban and rescued the soldier left behind.

There is also a book by Captain Eric Brown: Wings on my sleeve. He was a German speaking Brit who was a pilot and engineer during WW2. He was sent to steal as many German aircraft as possible at the end of the war. He went on to be a test pilot. He has probably flown more aircraft types than any other man. Was a pioneer of carrier landings. Both fantastic reads.

cardigankid

8,189 posts

166 months

Saturday 28th March
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Bentley: Four Cylinder Models in Detail
Bentley: Six Cylinder Models in Detail

Both by James Taylor

Great escapist stuff beer

Huff

2,552 posts

145 months

Saturday 28th March
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CR6ZZ said:
A bit dated, but still crammed with lots of useful information.

+1 That's still a cracking read, as is 'Engineer to Win'.

cranford10

275 posts

70 months

Sunday 29th March
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Just a heads up that all the CJ Sansom ‘Shardlake’ books are 99p for Kindle on Amazon today

alexsandro22

4 posts

3 months

Sunday 29th March
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Book Thief by Zusak

marcosgt

10,553 posts

130 months

Monday 30th March
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RC1807 said:
Recently read the last 3/4 Michael Connelly "Bosch" novels, only the latest one to buy / read
I've now watched all 5 series of Bosch on Amazon Prime....

Started Stuart Macbride's "The Blood Road" yesterday. Finished it now.
Christ, there's some grim content in that .... Suicide, murders, child abduction / paedophile ring / selling children *shudders* ... Just as well the author chucks some character humour in there too, or I'd have stopped reading it. frown
We have similar reading habits, currently reading "The Brass Verdict" - Mostly a Micky Haller novel, although Bosch appears (not that much so far - about a 1/3 through).

My son bought me The Blood Road for Christmas. It was OK (grim subject I agree), but I didn't feel particularly inspired to read more.

MB140 said:
If you like those sort of books (I do) then Ed Macey: Apache is a cracking read. It’s about all his tour in Afghan. But a portion is about the reduce of a British solider where they strapped 4 guys to the outside (yes outside) of an Apache. Flew them right in the stronghold of the taliban and rescued the soldier left behind.

There is also a book by Captain Eric Brown: Wings on my sleeve. He was a German speaking Brit who was a pilot and engineer during WW2. He was sent to steal as many German aircraft as possible at the end of the war. He went on to be a test pilot. He has probably flown more aircraft types than any other man. Was a pioneer of carrier landings. Both fantastic reads.
I'd agree on both those, too (I've got Macey's other book - Hellfire, I think it's called - but I haven't read it yet).

I've also got 3 going on the Kindle, Anthony Beevor's "The Battle For Spain", Mark Dawson's "Saint Death" and Tom Michell's "The Penguin Lessons" - I'm most enjoying the latter of the 3.

M

Edited by marcosgt on Monday 30th March 15:01