Books - What are you reading?

Books - What are you reading?

Author
Discussion

droopsnoot

8,765 posts

208 months

Tuesday 16th June 2020
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I bought two at the same time, I've just started the second one and it turns out not to be a Joe Pickett story. A bit early yet to see how good it is.

epom

7,878 posts

127 months

Tuesday 16th June 2020
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Catch and Kill by Ronan Farrow. Want to get some info before watching the Epstein documentary.

g3org3y

16,956 posts

157 months

Wednesday 17th June 2020
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Finished this last week. Very interesting and insightful read. If you were surprised that Brexit happened and Trump got into power, you need to read this.



Finished this today. Great book. Excellent rebuttal to the woke intersectional politics that appears to be infiltrating everyday life.


Now onto this:

K12beano

20,830 posts

241 months

Thursday 18th June 2020
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g3org3y said:
Finished this last week. Very interesting and insightful read. If you were surprised that Brexit happened and Trump got into power, you need to read this.



Finished this today. Great book. Excellent rebuttal to the woke intersectional politics that appears to be infiltrating everyday life.


Now onto this:
I like a bit of realism to balance up the fiction.... will have to take a look.

Am in two minds over the Steven Levy book. It was a bit boring. TBH.


MC Bodge

15,925 posts

141 months

Thursday 18th June 2020
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K12beano said:
I like a bit of realism to balance up the fiction.... will have to take a look.
It's also important to find "realism" that isn't just bias / confirmation bias.

K12beano

20,830 posts

241 months

Thursday 18th June 2020
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Fair point - slightly poor choice of word as a shorthand.... IYKWIM

g3org3y

16,956 posts

157 months

Wednesday 24th June 2020
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MC Bodge said:
K12beano said:
I like a bit of realism to balance up the fiction.... will have to take a look.
It's also important to find "realism" that isn't just bias / confirmation bias.
Read this previously.



I don't mind a bit of balance.

g3org3y said:
Now onto this:
Finished this morning.

Insightful, positive and actually quite uplifting. Did open my eyes to quite a few common misconceptions about the world we live in.

Edited by g3org3y on Wednesday 24th June 06:14

droopsnoot

8,765 posts

208 months

Wednesday 24th June 2020
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I finished "Badlands" by CJ Box the other day, a bit different in that it isn't one of his Joe Picket series. It was readable, I certainly wouldn't avoid any others with this character, if there are any. Investigator is involved in a long-time search for a truck driving serial killer, but also moves to North Dakota in a busy mining town for her full-time job and deals with stuff there.

colonel c

7,771 posts

205 months

Wednesday 24th June 2020
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The way of kings trilogy by Brandon Sanderson.




Part of his Stormlight Archive series.

Very slow going. Chronicling three main protagonists who have a tough and prolonged-time trying to achieve anything. Yet I'm keeping with it.

MC Bodge

15,925 posts

141 months

Wednesday 24th June 2020
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"Worms To Catch" Guy Martin.

An easy, but very interesting read. I really enjoyed it.

I know that some dislike him, but I have a lot of time for him.

droopsnoot

8,765 posts

208 months

Monday 29th June 2020
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I've just finished "The Kill Room" by Jeffery Deaver, a Lincoln Rhyme story with a few twists in it. The only part of these that I don't much care for are the way that the author includes the contents of the whiteboards that they use to keep track of the case. I never read them, and it never seems to make the story any less understandable or enjoyable.

g3org3y

16,956 posts

157 months

Wednesday 1st July 2020
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An interesting book on tax? Yes! Inspired after his Triggernometry interview here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLox5oCqmG0


glazbagun

11,737 posts

163 months

Wednesday 1st July 2020
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g3org3y said:
g3org3y said:
Now onto this:
Finished this morning.

Insightful, positive and actually quite uplifting. Did open my eyes to quite a few common misconceptions about the world we live in.
I might add that to the pile. I always made time for a new Hans Rosling talk.

rst99

489 posts

168 months

Friday 3rd July 2020
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A solid Harry Hole excursion mixing WWII and Neo-Nazism in a Nordic setting.



Now onto this about post-Columbian slavery in the Americas. A worthwhile read for anyone with an interest in American/European history or the subject of slavery itself.


MikeGTi

1,930 posts

167 months

Tuesday 7th July 2020
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Kind of sticking with a theme, I'm currently reading this:



It's really interesting, and details some really interesting disinformation campaigns from history.

I've got a long list in a similar vein to follow biggrin

matchmaker

7,524 posts

166 months

Wednesday 8th July 2020
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I've just read "Death in the North Channel", about the loss of the Irish Sea ferry "Princess Victoria" in January 1953. Absolutely harrowing read - 135 dead is still (I believe) the greatest peacetime loss of lives in British territorial waters. Only 44 survived, and there was not a single woman or child in that total.

I'd read about the disaster before, but it wasn't until I read this book that I discovered that the car deck was effectively open - the stern door was only about 5 feet high. Another fact that I didn't know - Princess Victoria only had W/T (Morse) radio equipment so could only directly contact the Coast Radio Station at Portpatrick and one of the rescuing destroyers. All the other vessels involved in the rescue including the two RNLI lifeboats had R/T (voice) radio equipment.

(I've cross posted this to Boats, Planes and Trains)

Edited by matchmaker on Wednesday 8th July 11:14

easyhome

88 posts

89 months

Wednesday 8th July 2020
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I’ve just finished Devolution by Max Brooks (author of World War Z). A change from zombies to Big Foot, thoroughly enjoyed it.

Also, don’t know if it’s been mentioned here before but for those who are fans (and if you’re not, why not?!), John Connolly has recently released a new Charlie Parker novella on his website. As with all of these, absolutely fantastic.

biggbn

10,017 posts

186 months

Sunday 12th July 2020
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Peter Cozzens 'The Earth is Weeping', a history of the wars with America's indigenous tribes. Well written, wonderfully researched and fairly even handed. Highly recommended

jimmyjimjim

6,097 posts

204 months

Sunday 12th July 2020
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Just started Janissaries IV: Mamelukes by Jerry Pournelle. Only 33 years since the third book came out.

irc

2,067 posts

102 months

Wednesday 15th July 2020
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matchmaker said:


I've just read "Death in the North Channel", about the loss of the Irish Sea ferry "Princess Victoria" in January 1953. Absolutely harrowing read - 135 dead is still (I believe) the greatest peacetime loss of lives in British territorial waters.e]
Actually I believe the loss of the Iolaire just outside Stornaway harbour on 1st January 1919 had a greater death toll of 205 including a great uncle of mine.

Aside from the number the tragedy of the Iolaire was that almost all the dead were merchant marine or servicemen who had survived WW1 only to drown within sight of home. 188 of the dead were from Lewis and Harris.

My grandfather was the only one of 4 brothers to survive WW1. Two brothers killed in battle and one on the Iolaire.

John Macleod wrote an excellent book on the subject. Most of the dead were from Lewis which in many ways lost a generation. My two great aunts from Lewis were among those who never married as so many men if their generation were dead.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/When-Heard-Bell-Loss-Iola...