Official 2022 Italian Grand Prix Thread ***SPOILERS***

Official 2022 Italian Grand Prix Thread ***SPOILERS***

Poll: Official 2022 Italian Grand Prix Thread ***SPOILERS***

Total Members Polled: 164

Hamilton: 12%
Russell: 3%
Verstappen: 63%
Perez: 0%
Leclerc: 16%
Sainz: 7%
Author
Discussion

MustangGT

9,584 posts

261 months

Sunday 18th September
quotequote all
jm doc said:
C70R said:
ajprice said:
HustleRussell said:
ETA: I hope Albon makes a speedy recovery of course and will be happy to see him back...

I would actually like de Vries to get another go because I feel like it'll be a reality check for everyone. He did an astonishing job in his rookie race weekend but I feel that a number of things conspired in his favour. People are depreciating Albon's results vs. Latifi as a result and I don't think I'm ready to do that.
Albon is at home and aiming to be in Singapore https://twitter.com/alex_albon/status/157085384888... . I wouldn't call being in intensive care after respiratory failure from an anaesthetic reaction a 'slight issue' though!
"Respiratory failure" is a very broad term, and covers a few different scenarios with varying levels of severity.

Even though it might seem quite scary to read, what Alex suffered is a not-uncommon reaction to general anaesthetic. It's easy to treat/monitor, and shouldn't really affect his recovery from the operation.
Rubbish. He suffered a serious and unusual complication of general anaesthesia in someone of his age. He’s been very lucky.
Could well have been sensitivity to Suxamethonium. This is something that can be tested for and is related to Cholinesterase. I suffer from this sensitivity and need to make sure it is known before any operation. It can be genetically passed down to your children.

numtumfutunch

4,197 posts

119 months

Monday 19th September
quotequote all
jm doc said:
Rubbish. He suffered a serious and unusual complication of general anaesthesia in someone of his age. He’s been very lucky.
What was the complication he had?

jm doc

2,171 posts

213 months

Monday 19th September
quotequote all
numtumfutunch said:
jm doc said:
Rubbish. He suffered a serious and unusual complication of general anaesthesia in someone of his age. He’s been very lucky.
What was the complication he had?
It’s been reported as respiratory failure.

jm doc

2,171 posts

213 months

Monday 19th September
quotequote all
C70R said:
jm doc said:
C70R said:
ajprice said:
HustleRussell said:
ETA: I hope Albon makes a speedy recovery of course and will be happy to see him back...

I would actually like de Vries to get another go because I feel like it'll be a reality check for everyone. He did an astonishing job in his rookie race weekend but I feel that a number of things conspired in his favour. People are depreciating Albon's results vs. Latifi as a result and I don't think I'm ready to do that.
Albon is at home and aiming to be in Singapore https://twitter.com/alex_albon/status/157085384888... . I wouldn't call being in intensive care after respiratory failure from an anaesthetic reaction a 'slight issue' though!
"Respiratory failure" is a very broad term, and covers a few different scenarios with varying levels of severity.

Even though it might seem quite scary to read, what Alex suffered is a not-uncommon reaction to general anaesthetic. It's easy to treat/monitor, and shouldn't really affect his recovery from the operation.
Rubbish. He suffered a serious and unusual complication of general anaesthesia in someone of his age. He’s been very lucky.
MrsC suffered exactly the same thing a few years ago. She was out of hospital after being monitored for 24hrs and it didn't impede her recovery.

It's an adverse reaction to general anaesthetic.
He was admitted to ICU, that doesn’t happen unless it’s serious
Just because your wife had something wrong doesn’t make it common, except perhaps to you.
We also don’t know the actual cause of his problem, respiratory failure is a broad term.


numtumfutunch

4,197 posts

119 months

Monday 19th September
quotequote all
jm doc said:
He was admitted to ICU, that doesn’t happen unless it’s serious
Just because your wife had something wrong doesn’t make it common, except perhaps to you.
We also don’t know the actual cause of his problem, respiratory failure is a broad term.
What kind of things give you respiratory failure if you're a young superfit sports person?

C70R

12,361 posts

85 months

Monday 19th September
quotequote all
jm doc said:
C70R said:
jm doc said:
C70R said:
ajprice said:
HustleRussell said:
ETA: I hope Albon makes a speedy recovery of course and will be happy to see him back...

I would actually like de Vries to get another go because I feel like it'll be a reality check for everyone. He did an astonishing job in his rookie race weekend but I feel that a number of things conspired in his favour. People are depreciating Albon's results vs. Latifi as a result and I don't think I'm ready to do that.
Albon is at home and aiming to be in Singapore https://twitter.com/alex_albon/status/157085384888... . I wouldn't call being in intensive care after respiratory failure from an anaesthetic reaction a 'slight issue' though!
"Respiratory failure" is a very broad term, and covers a few different scenarios with varying levels of severity.

Even though it might seem quite scary to read, what Alex suffered is a not-uncommon reaction to general anaesthetic. It's easy to treat/monitor, and shouldn't really affect his recovery from the operation.
Rubbish. He suffered a serious and unusual complication of general anaesthesia in someone of his age. He’s been very lucky.
MrsC suffered exactly the same thing a few years ago. She was out of hospital after being monitored for 24hrs and it didn't impede her recovery.

It's an adverse reaction to general anaesthetic.
He was admitted to ICU, that doesn’t happen unless it’s serious
Just because your wife had something wrong doesn’t make it common, except perhaps to you.
We also don’t know the actual cause of his problem, respiratory failure is a broad term.
MrsC was also rushed to intensive care, and monitored for ~24hrs before she was allowed to go home.

You seem to have a lot of knowledge for someone who hasn't experienced this directly...

DanielSan

18,091 posts

148 months

Monday 19th September
quotequote all
jm doc said:
He was admitted to ICU, that doesn’t happen unless it’s serious
Just because your wife had something wrong doesn’t make it common, except perhaps to you.
We also don’t know the actual cause of his problem, respiratory failure is a broad term.
The statement from Williams read: “Further to Alex Albon’s diagnosis of appendicitis on the morning of Saturday 10 September, he was admitted to San Gerardo hospital for treatment. He underwent a successful laparoscopic surgery on Saturday lunchtime.

“Following surgery, Alex suffered with unexpected post-operative anaesthetic complications which led to respiratory failure, a known but uncommon complication. He was re-intubated and transferred to intensive care for support.

The teams own statement said it was due to anastheric complications.

If you stop breathing it's fairly standard practice to be transferred to ICU especially as he was intubated. He also then left the hospital and went home less than 2 days later. It's not the most common reaction to anaesthetic but it is known to happen.

Sandpit Steve

6,852 posts

55 months

Tuesday 20th September
quotequote all
numtumfutunch said:
jm doc said:
He was admitted to ICU, that doesn’t happen unless it’s serious
Just because your wife had something wrong doesn’t make it common, except perhaps to you.
We also don’t know the actual cause of his problem, respiratory failure is a broad term.
What kind of things give you respiratory failure if you're a young superfit sports person?
A bad reaction to the drugs used in anesthesia. It’s surprisingly common, you get woken up by the doctors but ‘fall asleep’ again a short time later, with muscles relaxing including the lungs.

It would quickly be fatal if they didn’t immediately stabilise and monitor you, in the same way as during the operation, then bring you back awake more slowly. Happened to a couple of people I know, including my father. Scary as censored

DocJock

7,694 posts

221 months

Tuesday 20th September
quotequote all
Sandpit Steve said:
numtumfutunch said:
jm doc said:
He was admitted to ICU, that doesn’t happen unless it’s serious
Just because your wife had something wrong doesn’t make it common, except perhaps to you.
We also don’t know the actual cause of his problem, respiratory failure is a broad term.
What kind of things give you respiratory failure if you're a young superfit sports person?
A bad reaction to the drugs used in anesthesia. It’s surprisingly common, you get woken up by the doctors but ‘fall asleep’ again a short time later, with muscles relaxing including the lungs.

It would quickly be fatal if they didn’t immediately stabilise and monitor you, in the same way as during the operation, then bring you back awake more slowly. Happened to a couple of people I know, including my father. Scary as censored
Scoline/Suxamethonium apnoea. Usually spotted by an anaesthetist before removing intubation though...

RB Will

8,283 posts

221 months

Tuesday 20th September
quotequote all
Well I don’t think anyone predicted this to be the between races argument.
Must be a first that it doesn’t involve Max, Lewis or Masi hehe

MustangGT

9,584 posts

261 months

Tuesday 20th September
quotequote all
DocJock said:
Scoline/Suxamethonium apnoea. Usually spotted by an anaesthetist before removing intubation though...
Thanks DocJock, it seems the others did not read my post at the top of the page......

jm doc

2,171 posts

213 months

Tuesday 20th September
quotequote all
DocJock said:
Sandpit Steve said:
numtumfutunch said:
jm doc said:
He was admitted to ICU, that doesn’t happen unless it’s serious
Just because your wife had something wrong doesn’t make it common, except perhaps to you.
We also don’t know the actual cause of his problem, respiratory failure is a broad term.
What kind of things give you respiratory failure if you're a young superfit sports person?
A bad reaction to the drugs used in anesthesia. It’s surprisingly common, you get woken up by the doctors but ‘fall asleep’ again a short time later, with muscles relaxing including the lungs.

It would quickly be fatal if they didn’t immediately stabilise and monitor you, in the same way as during the operation, then bring you back awake more slowly. Happened to a couple of people I know, including my father. Scary as censored
Scoline/Suxamethonium apnoea. Usually spotted by an anaesthetist before removing intubation though...
He suffered from respiratory failure. We have not been told the cause, other than it was related to a general anaesthetic.

jm doc

2,171 posts

213 months

Tuesday 20th September
quotequote all
DanielSan said:
jm doc said:
He was admitted to ICU, that doesn’t happen unless it’s serious
Just because your wife had something wrong doesn’t make it common, except perhaps to you.
We also don’t know the actual cause of his problem, respiratory failure is a broad term.
The statement from Williams read: “Further to Alex Albon’s diagnosis of appendicitis on the morning of Saturday 10 September, he was admitted to San Gerardo hospital for treatment. He underwent a successful laparoscopic surgery on Saturday lunchtime.

“Following surgery, Alex suffered with unexpected post-operative anaesthetic complications which led to respiratory failure, a known but uncommon complication. He was re-intubated and transferred to intensive care for support.

The teams own statement said it was due to anastheric complications.

If you stop breathing it's fairly standard practice to be transferred to ICU especially as he was intubated. He also then left the hospital and went home less than 2 days later. It's not the most common reaction to anaesthetic but it is known to happen.
Thank you for posting that, I hadn’t seen that. As i said earlier and as the statement confirms, it is not common, especially in a young and fit person.

jm doc

2,171 posts

213 months

Tuesday 20th September
quotequote all
C70R said:
jm doc said:
C70R said:
jm doc said:
C70R said:
ajprice said:
HustleRussell said:
ETA: I hope Albon makes a speedy recovery of course and will be happy to see him back...

I would actually like de Vries to get another go because I feel like it'll be a reality check for everyone. He did an astonishing job in his rookie race weekend but I feel that a number of things conspired in his favour. People are depreciating Albon's results vs. Latifi as a result and I don't think I'm ready to do that.
Albon is at home and aiming to be in Singapore https://twitter.com/alex_albon/status/157085384888... . I wouldn't call being in intensive care after respiratory failure from an anaesthetic reaction a 'slight issue' though!
"Respiratory failure" is a very broad term, and covers a few different scenarios with varying levels of severity.

Even though it might seem quite scary to read, what Alex suffered is a not-uncommon reaction to general anaesthetic. It's easy to treat/monitor, and shouldn't really affect his recovery from the operation.
Rubbish. He suffered a serious and unusual complication of general anaesthesia in someone of his age. He’s been very lucky.
MrsC suffered exactly the same thing a few years ago. She was out of hospital after being monitored for 24hrs and it didn't impede her recovery.

It's an adverse reaction to general anaesthetic.
He was admitted to ICU, that doesn’t happen unless it’s serious
Just because your wife had something wrong doesn’t make it common, except perhaps to you.
We also don’t know the actual cause of his problem, respiratory failure is a broad term.
MrsC was also rushed to intensive care, and monitored for ~24hrs before she was allowed to go home.

You seem to have a lot of knowledge for someone who hasn't experienced this directly...
Maybe that’s because I’ve seen people on an almost daily basis for over 30 years who have had general anaesthesia?