One single thing that makes you think "knob" Vol 4

One single thing that makes you think "knob" Vol 4

Author
Discussion

LetsTryAgain

1,267 posts

29 months

Friday 3rd July
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Shirley not?

Export56

75 posts

44 months

Friday 3rd July
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Speaking of camo jackets, one thing that makes me think knob is fishermen ( the type that sit by resevoirs etc in camo jackets). Its like a scene from deliverance when you come across them, they always seem part of some weird subculture.

Mr Squarekins

138 posts

18 months

Saturday 4th July
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Export56 said:
Speaking of camo jackets, one thing that makes me think knob is fishermen ( the type that sit by resevoirs etc in camo jackets). Its like a scene from deliverance when you come across them, they always seem part of some weird subculture.
Camo, knife, old estate car, plastic sheeting. Nothing odd at at....

biggbn

5,821 posts

176 months

Saturday 4th July
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LetsTryAgain said:
biggbn said:
People who overuse the word 'literal ' or 'literally ' smile
So more than zero uses is classed as over use?

They are sphincters, is that better?
The ACTUAL ahole.
The hole, of your arse.

Blown2CV said:
grow up you pathetic child
I'm very grown up, thank you.
I even know where and when to use capital letters and punctuation.
Very clever you see.

Let me know if you'd like some help.
Oh, sorry. I thought this thread was about things that annoyed us, and made us think someone was, figuratively, a knob ( I do not think you or anyone is a knob by the way, its just my translation of the thread title). My dislike of what is becoming a new fashion, dropping literal or literally into ordinary speech when it is not strictly, or sometimes at all, necessary irritates me. Perhaps this marks me out as a (figurative) knob?

Can I show you what I mean? Here are two sentences.

I opened the door and my mate was literally on my doorstep.

I opened the door and my mate was on my doorstep.

There is no need for the word literally in the first sentence, both statements convey exactly the same thing.





captain_cynic

5,812 posts

51 months

Saturday 4th July
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biggbn said:
Can I show you what I mean? Here are two sentences.

I opened the door and my mate was literally on my doorstep.

I opened the door and my mate was on my doorstep.

There is no need for the word literally in the first sentence, both statements convey exactly the same thing.
Actually one statement conveys more emphasis than the other. Nor is either incorrect.

English is a language of obsessive minutiae but here the difference is as subtle as a brick to the face.

You're well within your rights not to like it... But don't expect us to pretend there is no difference. There literally is one as literally, the hyperbolic definition of literally is literally in the literal dictionary.

LetsTryAgain

1,267 posts

29 months

Saturday 4th July
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biggbn said:
Oh, sorry. I thought this thread was about things that annoyed us, and made us think someone was, figuratively, a knob ( I do not think you or anyone is a knob by the way, its just my translation of the thread title). My dislike of what is becoming a new fashion, dropping literal or literally into ordinary speech when it is not strictly, or sometimes at all, necessary irritates me. Perhaps this marks me out as a (figurative) knob?

Can I show you what I mean? Here are two sentences.

I opened the door and my mate was literally on my doorstep.

I opened the door and my mate was on my doorstep.

There is no need for the word literally in the first sentence, both statements convey exactly the same thing.
No, one is given greater emphasis than the other.

'Literal - taking words in their usual or most basic sense without metaphor or exaggeration'.

So I was calling them literal aholes.
Like I explained, the chocolate starfish part of the bum = the ahole.
You never answered my question?
Is more than once in one sentence too many?
Am I not able to use the word at all with you?


biggbn

5,821 posts

176 months

Saturday 4th July
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captain_cynic said:
biggbn said:
Can I show you what I mean? Here are two sentences.

I opened the door and my mate was literally on my doorstep.

I opened the door and my mate was on my doorstep.

There is no need for the word literally in the first sentence, both statements convey exactly the same thing.
Actually one statement conveys more emphasis than the other. Nor is either incorrect.

English is a language of obsessive minutiae but here the difference is as subtle as a brick to the face.

You're well within your rights not to like it... But don't expect us to pretend there is no difference. There literally is one as literally, the hyperbolic definition of literally is literally in the literal dictionary.
I'm sorry but the word, for me, is superfluous in the first statement. As I said, this may be a dislike that I am in a minority with, but dislike it I do. Sorry for swimming against the tide.

biggbn

5,821 posts

176 months

Saturday 4th July
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LetsTryAgain said:
biggbn said:
Oh, sorry. I thought this thread was about things that annoyed us, and made us think someone was, figuratively, a knob ( I do not think you or anyone is a knob by the way, its just my translation of the thread title). My dislike of what is becoming a new fashion, dropping literal or literally into ordinary speech when it is not strictly, or sometimes at all, necessary irritates me. Perhaps this marks me out as a (figurative) knob?

Can I show you what I mean? Here are two sentences.

I opened the door and my mate was literally on my doorstep.

I opened the door and my mate was on my doorstep.

There is no need for the word literally in the first sentence, both statements convey exactly the same thing.
No, one is given greater emphasis than the other.

'Literal - taking words in their usual or most basic sense without metaphor or exaggeration'.

So I was calling them literal aholes.
Like I explained, the chocolate starfish part of the bum = the ahole.
You never answered my question?
Is more than once in one sentence too many?
Am I not able to use the word at all with you?
Man, why so aggressive? I have explained this dislike of the use literal may be me only. But that's what this thread is for? As above, for me, to say someone is a literal ahole is an overuse of the word literal. I would have known exactly what you meant without saying literal. Its just an individual dislike I have and I have given my reasons. Jeez, some people like Brussel Sprouts, some don'tsmile

Perhaps it would have been clearer if I said I, personally, don't like when the words literal or literally are used for emphasis as i feel it is an overuse of language. I accept i may be in a minority with this (irrational?) dislike. Gbn

Edited by biggbn on Saturday 4th July 11:40

InitialDave

6,897 posts

75 months

Saturday 4th July
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biggbn said:
I'm sorry but the word, for me, is superfluous in the first statement. As I said, this may be a dislike that I am in a minority with, but dislike it I do. Sorry for swimming against the tide.
It's not, though, someone could say "on my doorstep" figuratively to mean "immediately outside my house", whereas "literally on my doorstep" would be, well, literally on the doorstep.

I agree people often misuse it, but it has its place.

biggbn

5,821 posts

176 months

Saturday 4th July
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InitialDave said:
biggbn said:
I'm sorry but the word, for me, is superfluous in the first statement. As I said, this may be a dislike that I am in a minority with, but dislike it I do. Sorry for swimming against the tide.
It's not, though, someone could say "on my doorstep" figuratively to mean "immediately outside my house", whereas "literally on my doorstep" would be, well, literally on the doorstep.

I agree people often misuse it, but it has its place.
I freely admit my dislike may be irrational man. We all have linguistic foibles that grate. Literally is one of mine, as are the use of 'so' at the start of every sentence, yet I write, and speak using quite flowery overdescriptive language at times so I am, at best, a hypocrite!! (Literally?) smile

Gerradi

970 posts

76 months

Saturday 4th July
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WOW...Coronavirus Lockdown has been hard on some...

LunarOne

1,092 posts

93 months

Saturday 4th July
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Use of the word literal is literally fine with me. But when people pronounce it as it were spelled "litcherally", I become annoyed beyond reason. Oops, wrong thread.

https://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&...


Mr Squarekins

138 posts

18 months

Sunday 5th July
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Gerradi said:
WOW...Coronavirus Lockdown has been hard on some...
Literally? wink

A1VDY

2,636 posts

83 months

Sunday 5th July
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My mate turned up and st on my doorstep..

My mate turned up and 'literally' st on my doorstep..

More emphasis on the stting part the latter sentence.

RonaldMcDonaldAteMyCat

7,233 posts

51 months

Sunday 5th July
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Your mate sounds like more fun than this thread.

JagBox

181 posts

109 months

Monday 6th July
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RonaldMcDonaldAteMyCat said:
Your mate literally sounds like more fun than this thread.
Fix it for you.......

greenarrow

2,333 posts

73 months

Monday 6th July
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..people who derail threads with their own private arguments that go on and on, with both participants suffering from chronic "last worditis".....

...Let it go!

Monkeylegend

18,982 posts

187 months

Monday 6th July
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...Let it go

nonsequitur

13,637 posts

72 months

Monday 6th July
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Monkeylegend said:
...Let it go
Then we'll all be Frozen.

Liquid Knight

15,625 posts

139 months

Friday 10th July
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Dealerships who only put the price and finance details in the windscreen. I had to do DVLA checks to find out if cars I was interested were diesel or had proper engines. No half-Windsor knots (forecourt sales people) about either. Waste of bloody time. rolleyes