RE: BMW M140i Finale says bye to rear-drive six-pot

RE: BMW M140i Finale says bye to rear-drive six-pot

Monday 11th February

BMW M140i Finale says bye to rear-drive six-pot

After this, the hottest 1 Series will switch to an A35-mirroring all-wheel drive, four-cylinder setup



BMW is bidding farewell to the formula of a six-cylinder, rear-wheel drive 1 Series with the launch of the M140i Finale edition, which will forever be the last to use this 'traditional' Bavarian setup. Since the next hot 1 Series model is set to adopt all-wheel drive and four-cylinder power, a controversial move that will align it more closely with rivals such as the Mercedes-AMG A35, the M140i Finale is here to close the chapter on the M division's tail-happy hot hatch.

Announced first for Australia, the Finale gets extra standard kit to entice buyers towards its 340hp form. Included as standard are a set of Orbit Grey 18-inch wheels, gloss black kidney grilles and darkened lights at the front and rear. The exhaust tailpipes are finished in black chrome to match, while metallic paint is standard.

Inside, there's wireless phone charging and the additional storage package, which provides more compartments to hold your things - handy when you're exercising the inline six up front - and the roof has an electric sunroof. That all comes on top of the regular kit list of the M140i, which includes top-spec infotainment, leather upholstery and keyless entry.


The car's main ingredients, that twin-scroll turbocharged 3.0-litre engine and accompanying rear-wheel drive hardware, remain unchanged, although the Finale only comes with an eight-speed automatic gearbox, meaning it just misses out on being the ultimate hero-spec 1 Series. We'd hope that a final edition of M140i for Britain would offer three-pedals as standard to really give the car a proper send-off. BMW UK's press office told PH that so far there's no mention as to whether we'll get one, though.

Either way, the next 1 Series is due to be launched later this year using front-wheel drive underpinnings that are shared with the 2 Series Active Tourer and Mini models. That means the powertrains under its bonnets will rotate 90 degrees into a space-saving transverse position, triggering the shift to multi-plate-clutch-enabled all-wheel drive for the following high-performance model.

The successor to the M140i is expected to be called the M130ix, which explains its use of a turbocharged 2.0-litre engine and two driven axles, and it could produce something in the region of 300hp. That's a significant power drop, but expect real-world pace for the next car to be at least as fast thanks to the additional traction on offer and steps forward in chassis development. No doubt it'll be a very effective machine.


But for those of us who prioritise driving dynamics above outright pace, it looks as though the outgoing rear-drive M140i will remain a peach of the 1 Series lineage. Sure, it's not been without its faults, but it's hard not to fall for the engine's silky smooth charms and its eagerness to over-rotate those back wheels.

So as news that the formula is to so drastically change with the successor spreads, expect demand for used examples to rise accordingly. It doesn't seem far-fetched to suggest that second hand prices for the whole family of M-fettled 1s, including the M135i and perhaps even the preceding 135i M Sport, will be boosted as people realise this is the end of the line for rear-drive 1 Serieses. If you're thinking about buying an M'd 1, you might not want to wait too long...

Author
Discussion

cmoose

Original Poster:

43,569 posts

167 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
article said:
the Finale only comes with an eight-speed automatic gearbox, meaning it just misses out on being the ultimate hero-spec 1 Series. Still, that's probably a reflection of the two markets it's currently confirmed for; we'd hope that a final edition of M140i for Britain would retain three-pedals as standard. BMW UK's press office told PH that so far there's no mention as to whether we'll get one, though.
Seems unlikely given the US generally takes more manuals of this type of car, not fewer. Which is why cars like the E60 and F10 M5 were offered with a manual option in the US but not in the UK - or anywhere else for that matter.

When it comes to driver's cars, the US is more into manual than the UK.

RocketRabbit

67 posts

99 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
Instead of badgering on about a manual box (yawn), why not the inclusion of a slipper diff - far more valuable.

Numeric

460 posts

89 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
There is a moment when you hook it up out of a roundabout and the rear squats down, the 6 pot howls and the whole car just feels alive. 4x4 will be quicker but I shall miss that sense of 'getting it right' that only a car of this ilk can give you (which with my skill is very seldom, making it even more engaging)

One other thought - the current car doesn't exactly take prisoners, frankly it is almost as wayward as the original 323i at times, so taming it is also a real pleasure - something to get a thrill from, rather than just going ever faster with unlimited grip from all those differentials. Hi Hunny I survived my commute can take on new meaning!

cerb4.5lee

10,767 posts

118 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
I hope the new 1 series is a little bit easier on the eyes than this one has been. It is a shame that the 6 cylinder RWD set up is going, and this car had a lot of fans on here.

cmoose

Original Poster:

43,569 posts

167 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
RocketRabbit said:
Instead of badgering on about a manual box (yawn), why not the inclusion of a slipper diff - far more valuable.
Says you. I wouldn't remotely agree. I'd have both given the option. But if I could only choose one, the manual box is going to make a big difference to the driving experience all the time. The diff is more niche in its impact on the experience.
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BFleming

859 posts

81 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
PH said:
The successor to the M140i is expected to be called the M130ix, which explains its use of a turbocharged 2.0-litre engine and two driven axles, and it could produce something in the region of 300hp.
According to the German automotive press, the following is the most likely engine line-up:
• 118i, 140 PS/220 Nm (1.5 3 cyl)
• 120i, 190 PS/280 Nm (2.0 4 cyl)
• 125i, 224 PS/310 Nm (2.0 4 cyl)
• 130i, 265 PS/380 Nm (2.0 4 cyl)
• M135i Performance 306 PS/450 Nm (2.0 4 cyl)
• 118d, 150 PS/350 Nm
• 120d, 190 PS/400 Nm
• 125d, 231 PS/500 Nm
• 125xe PHEV

There's no word yet on what models will have all wheel drive available/standard.

daveco

3,657 posts

145 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
Are manufacturers thinking long term here?

If every manufacturer essentially sells their car with very similar engines/drivetrains/transmissions, what will their USPs be?

ogrodz

71 posts

58 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
Great car to drive - will be sorely missed by its fan base.

Increasingly I find myself looking backwards at the BMW legacy, lamenting the current and future line up and longing for signs that a worthy successor to the likes of a 2002tii or Z8 is somewhere on the horizon. Ever hopeful...

cmoose

Original Poster:

43,569 posts

167 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
daveco said:
Are manufacturers thinking long term here?

If every manufacturer essentially sells their car with very similar engines/drivetrains/transmissions, what will their USPs be?
A fair point, but in reality I think the customer base couldn't care less. Which is precisely why the convergence is happening.

It's no good having an interesting and engaging layout if your doors are being blown off in the spec sheets.

acme

1,962 posts

136 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
The article mentions the possibility of a manual on this run out model, I seem to recall reading that you could no longer spec a manual on a M140 anyway, anyone know for sure?

Anyone had both a M135 and M140 and have a preference on the two engines?

Cheers

J4CKO

26,330 posts

138 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
Real World pace, does that mean when its wet as 4wd isnt such an advantage in the dry, I think there is a perception the M135i/M140i are just straight line devices for use in the dry only, the dry bit is true but they go round corners pretty well if there arent too many bumps to confuse the dampers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Top_Gear_tes...

"Not my words Carol".... check the company a standard M135i is keeping in that list, a balanced chassis, rapid auto box, marginally less drivetrain losses and plenty of torque means it puts down a respectable time.

I think prices will stay similar to what they are now as there are a lot about, enthusiasts may care about RWD and straight sixes but the Blogger types and their disciples will just go for the next shiny thing they can get for £300 odd quid a month that goes like stink. Personally I am quite happy with any drive layout as well.

JackReacher

1,337 posts

153 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
I think the manual may have been discontinued for emissions reasons, but it was also a low seller. Most people chose the point and squirt option.

I'm glad I went manual with my m240i, adds a bit more involvement but the auto is a good a good box.

TheDrBrian

2,799 posts

160 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
Are they going transverse engine with the next series of cars?

BFleming

859 posts

81 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
TheDrBrian said:
Are they going transverse engine with the next series of cars?
Yes.

st4

730 posts

71 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
daveco said:
Are manufacturers thinking long term here?

If every manufacturer essentially sells their car with very similar engines/drivetrains/transmissions, what will their USPs be?
Badge appeal and PCP rates.

I think it’s a shame this is going to end up as another transverse mount 4 pot hatch back.

Currently it’s a unique and interesting little car.

Fast Bug

6,557 posts

99 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
daveco said:
Are manufacturers thinking long term here?

If every manufacturer essentially sells their car with very similar engines/drivetrains/transmissions, what will their USPs be?
The vast majority of 1 Series sales are company car purchases with a diesel engine. The vast majority of those drivers are more concerned with benefit in kind than what wheels are driven. Total sales of the 140 must be tiny by comparison, so I doubt BMW would lose many (if any) sales over it being a 4 wheel drive 4 pot.

dunnoreally

249 posts

46 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
Sounds about right. Mini/AT platform, presumably. Wonder if thia also means an fwd 2 series?

Also, does anyone else suddenly quite want an RS3?

st4

730 posts

71 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
dunnoreally said:
Sounds about right. Mini/AT platform, presumably. Wonder if thia also means an fwd 2 series?

Also, does anyone else suddenly quite want an RS3?
Yep. Enthusiasts wanting a BMW that’s rear drive need to opt for the 3 series. Gym rats and PCP pilots can get a BMW for £300 still. Win win.

banny650

80 posts

81 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
"The car's main ingredients, that twin-turbocharged 3.0-litre engine" errr its a single twin scroll turbo haha

JD

1,725 posts

166 months

Monday 11th February
quotequote all
Isn't the motor a single turbo? not the twin as per the article?

I am both amazed and happy that you could get such an engine in a small car for so long.

I am not even remotely fussed that on a cold wet road it wouldn't see what way an A45 or S3 went.

Fancy diff might have been a good idea though!