Running a banger cost effective?

Running a banger cost effective?

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Discussion

Petrolsmasher

Original Poster:

2,144 posts

61 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Im soon to be commuting to work (6 miles down the road so not far) but im wanting to keep my car in good condition and not leave it in a busy car park all day. So im tempted to buy a 500 quid banger to use purely for the commute to work. Is this likely to be more hassle than its worth or can you usually get something half decent that will run for the year without costing much more than petrol?

Cheers

Greg the Fish

698 posts

11 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Yes.

Monkeylegend

16,346 posts

176 months

Tuesday 10th September
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No, you will need to tax and insure it as well.

p4cks

3,373 posts

144 months

Tuesday 10th September
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There's a long running thread here about running a shed:
https://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&...

I have however done exactly what you're intending to do, with a £525 Ford Focus and it's been bloody great:
https://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&...

Jonny_gti

157 posts

25 months

Tuesday 10th September
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had the same situation a few years ago ended up spending 1k on a polo 9n2 and to date done 30k miles hassle free and any little issue that does go wrong is pennies to fix.

Petrolsmasher

Original Poster:

2,144 posts

61 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
Monkeylegend said:
No, you will need to tax and insure it as well.
im looking at small engined runabouts so hopefully not too much tax or insurance.

singlecoil

27,823 posts

191 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Pick an old car from a reliable make make such as Honda or Mitsubishi

loudlashadjuster

3,390 posts

129 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Petrolsmasher said:
Im soon to be commuting to work (6 miles down the road so not far) but im wanting to keep my car in good condition and not leave it in a busy car park all day. So im tempted to buy a 500 quid banger to use purely for the commute to work. Is this likely to be more hassle than its worth or can you usually get something half decent that will run for the year without costing much more than petrol?

Cheers
Absolutely. For less than the initial lease on any 2019 car you can buy and run something like a mid-2000s supermini for a year. If it only costs £300 you can afford to bin it if it develops anything serious, but cars nowadays are so reliable than if you buy with your eyes open you should have no trouble getting a few years out of it.

My go-to car for a station run would be a tatty Ka. Ridiculously simple mechanically, you can leave it anywhere without fear, and pennies to buy, run and insure.

Liamjrhodes

102 posts

86 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Done this now for a number of years for our 'second' car
Always sub £1000
Always last at least 1 MOT before I get bored and want something new
Only ever cost me normal consumables
The cars I have had over the last few years
Corsa D £800 so far and still own it
mk1 ford focus £500 over 2 years
Saab 95 £900 over 18 month
Lexus ls400 £1000 over 12 month
Saxo £600 over 1 year
Corsa B £400 over 1 year
C2 £1000 over 2 years

Fingers crossed never had a major failure so far so i may be lucky or just picked good cars!

singlecoil

27,823 posts

191 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Pick an old car from a reliable make make such as Honda or Mitsubishi

Joey Deacon

1,653 posts

121 months

Tuesday 10th September
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If you are the sort of person who doesn't mind working on cars yourself then definitely, my experience over the last two years:

September 2017 I bought an 07 Renault Megane DCi 1.5 with 61k on the clock for £1200. 60MPG all day long, £30 road tax and nothing went wrong in 24K miles. Only costs were 4 tyres (£208), a set of wiper blades (£20) and two services with eBay filters and oil (£30 each time). Still have it actually, currently my backup shed although my mum wants it.

August 2019 got a bit bored of owning a diesel so ended up buying a 55 plate Honda Civic 2.0 Type S for £720 from eBay. Full main dealer Honda history from new, the previous owner spent £1100 on servicing, brakes and a knock sensor in the last 18 months. I have done 1K miles in it now and can confirm it is a good car apart from a few clonks over big bumps (suspect drop links). I have spent 10 hours cleaning it, spent £12 on some mats and another £10 on touch up paint. Only thing I have had to repair is the indicator in the wing mirror which is the whole indicator unit, not just a bulb. Honda wanted £65, got a copy part from eBay from china for £9 delivered (which looks exactly the same anyway).

My tip would be to get something unfashionable that has been properly looked after by it's previous owners. What you don't want is to buy is something that has been run on a shoestring for the last few years of it's life and is one MOT advisory away from the scrapheap.

Always check the online MOT history, if the car has failed and then scraped a pass every year with multiple advisories I would steer well clear. You want a car that has as few fails as possible and then for minor things like bulbs, tyres and wiper blades.

If you are the sort of person who doesn't even like lifting the bonnet then shedding is definitely not for you.

There are thousands of good sheds out there on eBay, half the fun I find is the investigation and spotting the good ones.



ConzoRS3

9 posts

5 months

Tuesday 10th September
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I run an 06 plate Fiat Stilo as a daily driver doing around 50 miles a day, I bought it last year for £800 with four new tyres and a years MOT since then it hasn't cost anything more than a service and usual consumables like break pads etc.. it still saves me money rather than driving the RS3 every day even taking insurance and tax into consideration.

Edited by ConzoRS3 on Tuesday 10th September 11:55

gazza285

5,251 posts

153 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Six miles? Push iron.


sjabrown

1,303 posts

105 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Very cost effective. My banger/shed history:
Corsa C (van): bought for £800 or so, got 2.5 years and 50,000 miles out of it before scrapping. 1.7DI engine so slow but 60+mpg. I never changed the oil!
Yaris: bought for £295 to replace the Corsavan. 10,000 miles in, and it returns 50mpg from the 1 litre petrol. Randomly losing coolant at times but I just top it up when it gets hot and on it goes.

Top tip: go for an economical engine if you do a lot of miles. I kept a log of every single penny spent on the Corsavan and the single biggest cost over the 50,000 miles was diesel (something like 833 gallons = near £5k!), followed by tyres, then tax, then insurance then parts. Bought it for £800, got £113 scrap value, total ownership cost nearly £8k.

_Hoppers

175 posts

10 months

Tuesday 10th September
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gazza285 said:
Six miles? Push iron.

What he said. Or perhaps an electric bike if you dont like getting to work all hot and sweaty.

murphyaj

242 posts

20 months

Tuesday 10th September
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_Hoppers said:
gazza285 said:
Six miles? Push iron.

What he said. Or perhaps an electric bike if you dont like getting to work all hot and sweaty.
I hate to be one of those annoying people who comes on a motoring forum and tells you not to drive, but this really is the answer. 6 miles might sound like a lot to someone who doesn't cycle much, but trust me after a few weeks it'll feel like nothing. If it's 6 miles through town you'll quickly find yourself wondering why on earth most people drive when it actually takes longer. Electric bikes are indeed a viable option too.

If you really, *REALLY* cannot bring yourself to cycle then yes, everyone else is right, a £500 shed is perfectly viable.

Joey Deacon

1,653 posts

121 months

Tuesday 10th September
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murphyaj said:
I hate to be one of those annoying people who comes on a motoring forum and tells you not to drive, but this really is the answer. 6 miles might sound like a lot to someone who doesn't cycle much, but trust me after a few weeks it'll feel like nothing. If it's 6 miles through town you'll quickly find yourself wondering why on earth most people drive when it actually takes longer. Electric bikes are indeed a viable option too.

If you really, *REALLY* cannot bring yourself to cycle then yes, everyone else is right, a £500 shed is perfectly viable.
Maybe he doesn't want to get to work all sweaty, or freezing cold and soaking wet from rain in the winter? Maybe he doesn't want to risk getting killed or seriously injured by somebody who was more interested in replying to their facebook/tinder message than watching where they are going in their SUV?


jamoor

10,050 posts

160 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Joey Deacon said:
Maybe he doesn't want to get to work all sweaty, or freezing cold and soaking wet from rain in the winter? Maybe he doesn't want to risk getting killed or seriously injured by somebody who was more interested in replying to their facebook/tinder message than watching where they are going in their SUV?
If it's bad weather take the car!

I'd say scooter


_Hoppers

175 posts

10 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Joey Deacon said:
sweaty, or freezing cold and soaking wet
An electric bike, extra layer of clothing and some waterproofs would sort that out.

Joey Deacon

1,653 posts

121 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
_Hoppers said:
Joey Deacon said:
sweaty, or freezing cold and soaking wet
An electric bike, extra layer of clothing and some waterproofs would sort that out.
And what about the getting squished by an SUV?