MP`s want a ban on cars parking on pavements.

MP`s want a ban on cars parking on pavements.

Author
Discussion

Drawweight

289 posts

61 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
I live in a new estate and our road suffers from the same problem.

I’ve got an allocated space and only have one car so that’s me sorted but the road is strewn with cars most of its length.

But here’s the kicker...I don’t mind.

It creates a slalom which slows everyone down to a reasonable speed far more effectively than sticking up 20 mph signs (which our road is).



Pig benis

782 posts

126 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
When I bought my first and current house I made sure that I had enough spaces. What I didn't consider is my neighbors not having exactly the same amount of parking

I live in a new 3 story town house with a garage, a space outside of the garage and a dedicated parking space. My neighbor who has exactly the same house has 1 dedicated parking space and a garage (filled with junk). This is the same for most of my neighbors which makes parking a real bd. Everyone who is short of a space will pinch a visitor space, which makes it tricky when others have friends / family over.

What really grinds my gears are my neighbors who have long wheelbase vans. There is literally no room for them and they're always parked badly.

Both my gf and I have vowed to never buy a house in an new estate, instead we will go for an older house with off street parking, mainly so I can have more toys..



Edited by Pig benis on Thursday 12th September 07:32

mat205125

15,658 posts

158 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
Pig benis said:
Both my gf and I have vowed to never buy a house in an new estate, instead we will go for an older house with off street parking, mainly so I can have more toys..
Understand completely, however the solution isn't necessarily just the age of the estates.

My parents still live in the house that I grew up in that was built in the 1960s.

Looking back at old pictures, the street was near empty when I was young, and through time, most sacrificed front gardens to widen their driveways when the norm pushed towards two cars per household. The time came then when us younglings grew up and bought cars, however were yet to fly the nest, and the norm stretched to 2.5 cars per house.

Even now, in that street, where most houses are still owned by the same generation, the road is jam packed as many have added a caravan or a motorhome to the fleet

A small holding with a large barn full of cars, bikes and karts is what we all need and deserve!! wink

ApOrbital

6,195 posts

63 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
MYOB said:
Obviously this only applies in London.
Needs to be everywhere my house and four others get blocked in because of it,Fed up when you need to go out and drive I might put some big rocks down.

Pothole

27,344 posts

227 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
Pan Pan Pan said:
I put this note up on the bad parking thread but wondered if it should not have a thread of its own.
On the face of it stopping cars from parking on pavements is a good thing, but as usual it is not as simple an issue as politicians seem to think it is.
Too many estates are designed to the minimum standards as developers try to squeeze the maximum number of hutches onto the smallest space, and this includes 1. the access roads, and 2. the provision of visitors parking areas.
When they design these estates do they not consider, that at some points in time other people than, the people living in the hutches will have relatives, and friends visiting them, not forgetting delivery vehicles, fire engines and ambulances etc that require some level of access to the hutches.
Many estate roads are so narrow, and have no provision for visitor parking, where can visiting people park?
I say this because as posted elsewhere when visiting my brother I had the choice of parking with two wheels on the pavement, or parking fully on the road, which would leave little if no room for even cars, let alone delivery vehicles of heaven forbid emergency vehicles to get through.
A pedestrian walking by said I should not be doing that, and I had to agree with him, but when I asked him where the visitor parking areas were, he looked at me like I had just come down from another planet
A survey need to be carried out to determine how the maximum value from the available space can be achieved. Some pavements seem to have very little foot traffic, so if foot traffic in that area is not great the ration between pavement width and road width could be adjusted accordingly, in order to bias the available space to those who use it the most.
If pedestrian traffic exceeds vehicle traffic , then it is the pavement width. which must be increased
I am sure that an efficient ratio could be achieved, but what would the cost of implementing the findings of such a survey be to the economy?

Edited by Pan Pan Pan on Wednesday 11th September 10:49


Edited by Pan Pan Pan on Wednesday 11th September 10:50
Which MPs? (note no apostrophe needed for the plural) Where have you got this from?

Pig benis

782 posts

126 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
mat205125 said:
A small holding with a large barn full of cars, bikes and karts is what we all need and deserve!! wink
Sir, I like the way you think

Gary C

5,251 posts

124 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
sjg said:
In Japan you have to prove you have off-street parking (either at your house or rented close by) in order to buy a car in the first place. No overnight street parking.

If you have to park on the pavement to allow enough space for emergency vehicles, then don't park there. Go further away and walk.
If only that were possible in every case.

In some areas, you might have to walk a few miles with kids & shopping, while having two wheels on a pavement would have no negative impact. Its all about people thinking.

And thats in short supply.

bobtail4x4

1,966 posts

54 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
mat205125 said:
A small holding with a large barn full of cars, bikes and karts is what we all need and deserve!! wink
I bought one

swisstoni

8,009 posts

224 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
Pothole said:
Pan Pan Pan said:
I put this note up on the bad parking thread but wondered if it should not have a thread of its own.
On the face of it stopping cars from parking on pavements is a good thing, but as usual it is not as simple an issue as politicians seem to think it is.
Too many estates are designed to the minimum standards as developers try to squeeze the maximum number of hutches onto the smallest space, and this includes 1. the access roads, and 2. the provision of visitors parking areas.
When they design these estates do they not consider, that at some points in time other people than, the people living in the hutches will have relatives, and friends visiting them, not forgetting delivery vehicles, fire engines and ambulances etc that require some level of access to the hutches.
Many estate roads are so narrow, and have no provision for visitor parking, where can visiting people park?
I say this because as posted elsewhere when visiting my brother I had the choice of parking with two wheels on the pavement, or parking fully on the road, which would leave little if no room for even cars, let alone delivery vehicles of heaven forbid emergency vehicles to get through.
A pedestrian walking by said I should not be doing that, and I had to agree with him, but when I asked him where the visitor parking areas were, he looked at me like I had just come down from another planet
A survey need to be carried out to determine how the maximum value from the available space can be achieved. Some pavements seem to have very little foot traffic, so if foot traffic in that area is not great the ration between pavement width and road width could be adjusted accordingly, in order to bias the available space to those who use it the most.
If pedestrian traffic exceeds vehicle traffic , then it is the pavement width. which must be increased
I am sure that an efficient ratio could be achieved, but what would the cost of implementing the findings of such a survey be to the economy?

Edited by Pan Pan Pan on Wednesday 11th September 10:49


Edited by Pan Pan Pan on Wednesday 11th September 10:50
Which MPs? (note no apostrophe needed for the plural) Where have you got this from?
I know Buckinghamshire county council have proposed it. If this is the source report, it’s not MPs, and it’s not the whole country.

But they mentioned that some old folks and disabled people have been effectively imprisoned by bad parking in some areas.
So it’s not for nothing.

MKnight702

2,046 posts

159 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
Like most ideas that politicians have, it sounds great until you look closer.

It is yet another salvo in the war on the motorist and like all others my response is the same. Provide me with a VIABLE alternative.

thecremeegg

1,236 posts

148 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
Our estate has everyone parking on the pavements, me included.
Can't see the problem in such a place to be quite honest, there's enough pavement left to walk down quite easily?
We have 1 allocated space but 3 cars (soon to be 2 but still!), plus our neighbour has a drive, garage and 5 old bangers that are all parked on the road/pavement.
There just isn't the space to park all cars off the road completely, don't quite see why it's a problem anyway unless you block the pavement completely?

Pan Pan Pan

Original Poster:

4,759 posts

56 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
bobtail4x4 said:
park in a carpark somewhere?
That is partly the point. If the councils want to avoid people parking on the roads they should insist on properly sized visitor parking areas accessible to the houses being visited being made available as being an integral part of an estates design. However many do not, and if anything seem to want to make parking (even for the actual residents of an estate difficult or not even available because polar bears.. they can hardly be surprised if they do this and then discover that people are having to park partially on the pavement.
On many estates the pavements are totally deserted for 95% of the time, (there could be a parking time zone so that when the pavements are most likely to be used by pedestrians e.g getting kids to school cars should be kept off them. Alternatively studies to determine the actual use levels of both the roads and pavements could be carried out to determine what ratio of road width to pavement width offers the most efficient use of the available space .In some areas this may result in wider pavements and narrower carriageways, whilst in others the reverse might be true.
No matter what is done making such changes is likely to be very expensive in an overcrowded UK.
It is no good saying there are too many cars, when the real root of the problem is that there are too many people trying to live in too small a space. In this case there always will be such problems.

Pan Pan Pan

Original Poster:

4,759 posts

56 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
Pothole said:
Pan Pan Pan said:
I put this note up on the bad parking thread but wondered if it should not have a thread of its own.
On the face of it stopping cars from parking on pavements is a good thing, but as usual it is not as simple an issue as politicians seem to think it is.
Too many estates are designed to the minimum standards as developers try to squeeze the maximum number of hutches onto the smallest space, and this includes 1. the access roads, and 2. the provision of visitors parking areas.
When they design these estates do they not consider, that at some points in time other people than, the people living in the hutches will have relatives, and friends visiting them, not forgetting delivery vehicles, fire engines and ambulances etc that require some level of access to the hutches.
Many estate roads are so narrow, and have no provision for visitor parking, where can visiting people park?
I say this because as posted elsewhere when visiting my brother I had the choice of parking with two wheels on the pavement, or parking fully on the road, which would leave little if no room for even cars, let alone delivery vehicles of heaven forbid emergency vehicles to get through.
A pedestrian walking by said I should not be doing that, and I had to agree with him, but when I asked him where the visitor parking areas were, he looked at me like I had just come down from another planet
A survey need to be carried out to determine how the maximum value from the available space can be achieved. Some pavements seem to have very little foot traffic, so if foot traffic in that area is not great the ration between pavement width and road width could be adjusted accordingly, in order to bias the available space to those who use it the most.
If pedestrian traffic exceeds vehicle traffic , then it is the pavement width. which must be increased
I am sure that an efficient ratio could be achieved, but what would the cost of implementing the findings of such a survey be to the economy?

Edited by Pan Pan Pan on Wednesday 11th September 10:49


Edited by Pan Pan Pan on Wednesday 11th September 10:50
Which MPs? (note no apostrophe needed for the plural) Where have you got this from?
It has been in the national news feeds, and on various news based chat programs for several days now, That is where I saw it.

Pan Pan Pan

Original Poster:

4,759 posts

56 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
swisstoni said:
Pothole said:
Pan Pan Pan said:
I put this note up on the bad parking thread but wondered if it should not have a thread of its own.
On the face of it stopping cars from parking on pavements is a good thing, but as usual it is not as simple an issue as politicians seem to think it is.
Too many estates are designed to the minimum standards as developers try to squeeze the maximum number of hutches onto the smallest space, and this includes 1. the access roads, and 2. the provision of visitors parking areas.
When they design these estates do they not consider, that at some points in time other people than, the people living in the hutches will have relatives, and friends visiting them, not forgetting delivery vehicles, fire engines and ambulances etc that require some level of access to the hutches.
Many estate roads are so narrow, and have no provision for visitor parking, where can visiting people park?
I say this because as posted elsewhere when visiting my brother I had the choice of parking with two wheels on the pavement, or parking fully on the road, which would leave little if no room for even cars, let alone delivery vehicles of heaven forbid emergency vehicles to get through.
A pedestrian walking by said I should not be doing that, and I had to agree with him, but when I asked him where the visitor parking areas were, he looked at me like I had just come down from another planet
A survey need to be carried out to determine how the maximum value from the available space can be achieved. Some pavements seem to have very little foot traffic, so if foot traffic in that area is not great the ration between pavement width and road width could be adjusted accordingly, in order to bias the available space to those who use it the most.
If pedestrian traffic exceeds vehicle traffic , then it is the pavement width. which must be increased
I am sure that an efficient ratio could be achieved, but what would the cost of implementing the findings of such a survey be to the economy?

Edited by Pan Pan Pan on Wednesday 11th September 10:49


Edited by Pan Pan Pan on Wednesday 11th September 10:50
Which MPs? (note no apostrophe needed for the plural) Where have you got this from?
I know Buckinghamshire county council have proposed it. If this is the source report, it’s not MPs, and it’s not the whole country.

But they mentioned that some old folks and disabled people have been effectively imprisoned by bad parking in some areas.
So it’s not for nothing.
As posted earlier I actually agree with not parking partially on pavements, but if the government and councils do not provide viable alternatives, for what is a reasonable, and only to be expected requirement (The fact that people living in dwellings don't live there in isolation, and are highly likely to get visits from relatives, friends, doctors, delivery vehicles, ambulance, fire engines etc at all times of the day and night) They can hardly be surprised that what happens is what happens. They cannot have it, or perhaps more accurately should not be allowed to have it both ways in this. As usual an only half thought out, knee jerk reaction from some MP`s.

gazza285

5,246 posts

153 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
MKnight702 said:
Provide me with a VIABLE alternative.
They don’t need to, it is not a fundamental human right.

irocfan

20,170 posts

135 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
mat205125 said:
A small holding with a large barn full of cars, bikes and karts is what we all need and deserve!! wink
that gets my vote

AmosMoses

3,360 posts

110 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
I'm all for it, knowing a few blind people who have guide dogs I really feel for them in some areas where cars are strewn anywhere that the selfish owner feels is "their" space.

corozin

2,666 posts

216 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
Hol said:
I am sure I have read on here before (and it could have been 8th hand information), that the government planners have stipulated that the parking spaces and road width for new developments are limited on purpose, to force people into only have one vehicle per household. People got creative instead and use the pavements.

If true, this new rule suggests an attempt to force people into complying with that flawed initial assumption that a lack of spaces would stop people buying extra cars.
It's also a proposal that quickly falls victim to the accusation that the planners who conjure these things up as well as the MPs who push them onto the statute books aren't the people who have to live in terraced narrow streets, or new builds in Swindon - they all live in comfy detached houses with spacious drives and double garages.

otolith

38,471 posts

149 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
If you let people in new build estates park on the street, they'll fill their garage with crap or convert it into an extra room. The effect we see is exactly what human nature would predict.

LeoSayer

5,801 posts

189 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
Baldchap said:
Highway code 244:

You MUST NOT park partially or wholly on the pavement in London, and should not do so elsewhere unless signs permit it.
Pavement parking allowed in London here:

https://goo.gl/maps/7UYNJNYWF6zGeQm8A