RE: Audi TT RS | PH Fleet

RE: Audi TT RS | PH Fleet

Author
Discussion

KerwinR

126 posts

30 months

Wednesday 23rd October
quotequote all
Brilliant cars, I have a 2012 TTS manual on a stage 1 map (310hp) One of the best cheaper mods you can do is to get a powerflex dogbone mount insert.
You get a little more vibration (settles down after a few hundred miles) but it tightens up the front end, gearshift is more positive too. Well worth the forty odd quid. Easy to fit too.

mikeswagon

38 posts

89 months

Wednesday 23rd October
quotequote all
Very nice Ben, and far too good for hairdressers.

I'm not a regular at the salon as you can imagine, but I think and MX5 or a nice MINI would be more what you're after there.

Niffty951

1,835 posts

176 months

Wednesday 23rd October
quotequote all
Superb choice! I've come so close to buying a TR RS. Two friends used to own Audi Coupes (the American sized quattro) and the sound has always stayed with me.

The first time I 'almost' bought one I ended up in an M135i, the second time I swayed towards the RS3 for practically and then in an internal battle having a manual over-weighed my desire for the engine and I went for a 380hp S3 instead.

A part of me will always want the TT RS. Possibly the part that watched a mapped one out drag an R8 and grew up on S1 and Dahlback quattro videos.

Enjoy.

Maldini35

2,262 posts

136 months

Wednesday 23rd October
quotequote all

Now you’ve got me thinking about my old one!

In addition to the many good suggested mods (remap, dampers, springs, bushes, ARB’s, dignone mount etc) I would remove the fixed wing (never looked right to me) and replace with the standard electric set up.
Also debadge to avoid some unwanted attention.

You have a cracking road biased car with one of the all times great engines.





Brian Fallon

28 posts

19 months

Wednesday 23rd October
quotequote all
As noted by many, great engine BUT the chassis and body control in the gen 2 TT is bang average so, good fun to drive in a straight line but less than confidence inspiring at speed on a twisting road. The chassis in the gen 3 is a big improvement.

jasonTVR

9 posts

104 months

Wednesday 23rd October
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The Mrk 1 cars are the best looking of the lot. May be a little slow for some, me included today - but not back in the day! I don't feel you can fault the looks of a 225!

dc2rr07

1,238 posts

179 months

Wednesday 23rd October
quotequote all
Good buy Ben, we have had ours for over five years now and honestly cannot fault it thumbup

BenLowden

1,879 posts

125 months

PH Marketing Bloke

Thursday 24th October
quotequote all
KerwinR said:
Brilliant cars, I have a 2012 TTS manual on a stage 1 map (310hp) One of the best cheaper mods you can do is to get a powerflex dogbone mount insert.
You get a little more vibration (settles down after a few hundred miles) but it tightens up the front end, gearshift is more positive too. Well worth the forty odd quid. Easy to fit too.
Thanks for the tip, will add that to the shortlist! Had one on my Megane and definitely improved the gear shift feel.

mikeswagon said:
Very nice Ben, and far too good for hairdressers.

I'm not a regular at the salon as you can imagine, but I think and MX5 or a nice MINI would be more what you're after there.
Cheers Mike! Looks like you me and Dan have all the bases covered then between us laugh

dc2rr07 said:
Good buy Ben, we have had ours for over five years now and honestly cannot fault it thumbup
Superb, glad to hear it!

Slippydiff

10,664 posts

171 months

Thursday 24th October
quotequote all
I ran a TTRS Plus (It had a slightly more powerful 360hp engine, sports exhaust , and some bling carbon trim in the engine bay) for 8 months 4 years ago.

I’d briefly owned a V10 M6 the year previously, and I loved the noise and grunt of the V10 engine and the quirky SMG gearbox, alas the fuel consumption was truly parlous, not helped by the comedy sized fuel tank, but regrettably, courtesy of the local council I "rearranged" the front suspension geometry by driving the car down a massive pothole less than a month after buying it, after which it was never a nice steer.

Prior to that I'd owned a BMW 1 M coupe, which I'd lightly modified to improve/tailor to my needs. During my ownership I drove a couple of TTRS's back to back, the first a less than 2k mile dealer demonstrator, the other a 20k mile car being sold by a specialist car dealer.

The Audi demonstrator was a 340hp model that felt every bit as quick as the 1M, but not as engaging/fun to drive. The second Ibis white car just felt hopeless ; slow, wallowy and lacking in grip. The test drive of the Ibis car was enough to dissuade me from buying a TTRS (and hence the purchase of the V10 M6)

My daily driver was a great car, but fun it wasn't, and whilst I also owned a 996 GT3, the increase in value of the 996 Porsche GT cars meant they’d become too rare and expensive to ruin by driving them on our heavily salted roads through the Winter.

I've always liked the concept of the TTRS, four wheel drive, flappy paddle box, superb 5 pot engine etc etc. So when I became aware that the Plus existed (and it came with the Sports exhaust as standard) I thought it might make a rather good second/Winter car.

After studying Pistonheads, AutoTrader and The Audi Approved cars website on and off for 4 months, I decided another test drive (in a Plus) was called for. I drove two cars and bought the second, a low mileage Suzuka grey example from Newbury Audi.

Dislikes :

The seats. Probably the most uncomfortable, unsupportive, hard, slidey seats I've ever had the misfortune to sit in.
OP, those aren’t the bucket seats in your car BTW.

The TTRS could be optioned with a far more supportive and enveloping, not too mention, sporty seat :



I’m not sure what Audi were thinking of when they put the “standard” seats into a car such as the TTRS which is capable of generating such impressive lateral G (and so effortlessly) surely you’d just fit the option seat as standard to differentiate the RS from the other, less sporty models ?

A seat manufacturing friend told me the standard Audi leather has a hard/stiff plasticky foam backing that makes it very hard (it reduced wrinkling) the downside is it doesn't mould around/too you, and in turn it doesn't support you well in hard cornering. Hardly ideal in this application.

But furthermore the steering wheel/seat relationship was all wrong for my frame (I'm 5'11" and 13.5 stone with stumpy legs and long torso) In fact you might say I'm a bit of a freak !

Most noticeable was the fact you sat ON the seats rather than IN them, and with the steering wheel set to it's lowest position, the wheel was still too high and didn't extend out far enough.

During my brief test drives, I wasn't really aware of the problem with seats/driving position, but the 90 mile journey home when I collected the car soon exposed the issue. By the time I got home my back was agony. So much so that I seriously considered returning the car the following day, and asking for my money back.

I tried driving the car on several more occasions, and in the process tried moving the seat/steering wheel in to just about every conceivable position imaginable. All to no avail.

Having experienced EXACTLY the same issue with the seats in my BMW 1 M coupe and sorted the problem :

http://www.1addicts.com/forums/showthread.php?t=83...

Some radical surgery was called for with the TTRS...........



The Sparco seats (I’d removed from the 1M prior to selling it) were fitted into the TTRS using the same techniques as those in the 1M, interestingly BMW and Audi use the same bolt spacing from front to rear, but it differs from left to right.

The standard seats weigh a lot, so I'm guessing at least 40kg was removed as a result of the fitment of the Sparco buckets. The seat positions were permanently fixed, so access to the token rear seats was no longer possible.

I had an airbag warning light on the dash, but that could have been extinguished by using a resistor plugged into the occupancy sensor wiring.

The difference the fitment of the seats made to driving/being a passenger in the car had to be felt to be believed (just as it did in the 1M)

No longer did you feel perched on top of the seat, nor did you need to brace yourself using the steering wheel whilst cornering quickly. Instead you felt a part of the car, it became an extension of you. Suitably ensconced it's truly shocking what the car was capable of in the twisties.

With the seating arrangements now sorted, it allowed me to drive and enjoy the car.

Here were my findings :

Brakes : They have well documented issues. Based on their size alone, they should have been well up to the job. In reality the pads and discs are hopeless. Put under duress the pads overheated and the transfer layer accordingly became uneven and/or the discs start to heat up and expand unequally and bad brake judder followed in fairly short order.

A set of Daveb's slightly smaller but superior quality AP discs and Pagid pads would have sorted the problem (and most likely the fitment of his larger rear disc conversion too)

Steering : Just Ok.
Why Audi decreed they had to utilise flat- bottomed steering wheels in their sprorty their cars, I really have no idea, but if they must use the pesky things, at least fit a sufficiently quick rack as to not require you to manhandle a non-round steering wheel in pretty much any and every corner you negotiate in the car ...

I found the steering overly (and falsely) overweighted, but with a certain deadness around the straight ahead position.
Once on the move at speed, it was pretty good, but a faster rack with perhaps 3/4 -1 turn removed from it, and the removal of all the speed sensitive nonsense, would have transformed how the car drove.

Tyres : The car left the factory on Toyos. I wasn't a fan, though they were better than I thought they'd be. They didn't like standing water (at all), they were quite noisy, they lacked outright grip and their low speed ride was harsh.
I'd have replaced them with Michelin Pilot SuperSports. More of which anon ....

Audi MMi : I was used to/familar with BMW's idrive system. the Audi system didn’t seem particularly intuitive, was overly complex and fiddly, added to which the sat nav lacked full postcode compatibility, and the main rotary control for the MMi was horrible and lacked a decent shape/control surface.

Xenon headlights. Only just up to the job for what is a very quick and usable all weather cross country car.

Likes : Pretty much everything else ! ! smile

Engine : What can I say ? Fantastic noise, soooo torquey, lots of grunt, lots of character (more/different compared to the 1M's) a bit more economical than the 1M's too.

Gearbox : Whilst I like good old fashioned manual 'box, there's always a place for a DSG 'box too. Sometimes it seemed a bit clunky, but it didn’t bother me as I spent three years and 30k miles behind the wheel of an M3 CSL with its REALLY clunky SMG 'box, ditto the M6 V10. The DSG box makes a lot of sense in the TT, such was it's speed around the twisty stuff.

Suspension : Low speed ride was a bit harsh, but at higher speeds it's damper and spring rates were perfectly judged. The way it rode high speed undulations was a revelation compared to most moderm BMW's. I was amazed at the way it hunkered down and gripped.

Appearance : I chucked the hideous front number plate plinth (and number plate) away, likewise the "TTRS" badge off the grille, so the front end looked far less cluttered and looked much better/tidier for it.

I was shocked at just how anonymous the car was, and without wishing to offend, most clearly saw it as just another hairdressers TT with a fancy rear spoiler. But, those in the know, know, and whilst it didn't get loads of admiring glances, it got enough from those in the know (that may have been down to the lack of the front number plate though) as it made the front end look much more purposeful, tidier and the grille look simply huuuuuuuuge.

I had a wobble with the Suzuka paintwork, but came to really like how "different" it was from silver or Ibis white.
When someone said "Couldn't they be bothered to paint it at the factory ?" (and a good few did) I merely told them to “take a closer look, then you'll see it's actually a pearl metallic”
They would, and then they’d say "Oooooh, that really quite nice isn't it ....." smile

The added benefit of Suzuka is it doesn't show the dirt too badly. As I'm a driver and not a polisher, that was important !
Likewise those brilliant wheels, matt grey, big spokes with no fiddly corners = Don't show the dirt/brake dust and easy to clean. Someone at Audi must have read my mind when the designed them ! !

Exhaust : It could get a bit boomy and drone in Sport, but if it did, I switched it off. This video is what made me want a car with the optional Sports exhaust (standard on the Plus)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXmcy1zfkFI

It reminded me of the wonderful V10 in the M6,

Build quality. This was my first Audi, and I was staggered at the build quality. It was so much better screwed together compared with modern BMW's. It felt incredibly solid and very durable. And as I was find out, it was indeed VERY well built and very solid ...

Despite having owned some quick German metal ; 996 GT2/GT3/GT3 RS, 997 GT3, M6 V10 etc, the Audi was probably one of the quickest point to point, all weather cars I've owned/driven. It's abilities across give and take A and B road were quite simply devastating (all the more so once it had some decent seats). I did several runs into mid and N.Wales and was shocked at the length of time it took me to get home, so quick was the car.

I did a 1600 mile trip up to and around Western Scotland. I chose the TT over my GT3 for the journey (high praise indeed I think you'd agree)

The TT was utterly superb. I'd already "bonded" with it prior to the trip, but five days behind the wheel on some of the best driving roads amid some the most stunning scenery only served to cement my relationship with the car.

Basking in the Scottish sunlight :



Those Scottish roads :





And finally the list of modifications I had planned :

APR cast downpipe : http://www.goapr.co.uk/products/apr_exh ... 5tfsi.html

APR intercooler kit : http://www.goapr.co.uk/products/interco ... _ttrs.html

MRC Stage 2 remap.

DaveB AP front brake disc/pad upgrade.

Daveb rear disc upgrade (and possibly the 4 pot Boxster caliper upgrade too)

Michelin Pilot Supersports.

MSS Springs.

Uprated (switchable Haldex controller.

Alas, several months into my ownership, I got bored with the car, because whilst it was massively quick, it was ultimately rather soulless. So I decided to sell it, but before doing so, I decided I go for one last hoon ...
I headed up to N.Wales early one August morning and pitted the RS against a 3.9/440hp engined Mk 1 996 GT3.

On give and take roads, especially where snap overtaking was called for, the little Audi was excellent, but then a very fast approach to what I mistakenly thought was a fast opening right hander, turned out to be anything but, and in reality was a 90 right ...
Exit stage left one TTRS at speed.

In stock form, in extremis, these cars understeer, then understeer some more, then some more ... until ultimately you run out of road and or hit something (see what happens even at slow speed at 4mins 19 secs in the video I linked to earlier in this post)

That something was a small berm where a hedge had once resided (other drivers had clearly found themselves in this scenario before me ... ) The hedge had long since gone, but the hump/berm remained.

The berm served to very effectively “launch” the car through a post and barbed wire fence, of which it took out a good 100 metres.

The car ended up stationary in a, thankfully empty, field. Still running, I gently eased it to the nearest gateway, and drove it back on to the road. Despite looking VERY secondhand, it still drove.
In fact so strong are these cars, I drove it home some 70 miles. Whilst the wheel alignment was clearly out, it wasn’t badly so.
The only sign I’d been involved in any kind of incident was the dash telling me the contents of the ruptured washer bottle had disappeared !!

The repair bill was big, and the list of parts required to fix it, long.
An O/S door, a N/S/R quarter panel, a bonnet, two front wings, a front bumper, two sill extensions, a front subframe, radiator, steering rack etc etc.
The repairs took 14 weeks as there wasn’t a single new O/S door assembly available in the world. I kid you not. The door being on back order with Audi, and with no projected manufacturing date scheduled.

After weeks of scouring the interweb, I finally found a brand new, boxed item on the Bay of E. With the car returned to its former glory, I traded it within 24 hours of getting it back. A slightly ignominious end for what was a great little car.
Once the latest cars have dropped another 8-10K I may well be tempted to dip my toe in the water once again ...






Edited by Slippydiff on Thursday 24th October 17:32

Bencolem

493 posts

187 months

Thursday 24th October
quotequote all
Did a track day at Oulton Park in one of these. The most one dimensional (understeer or understeer) car ever. Sure it makes for a nice real world road car though.

JaredVannett

841 posts

91 months

Thursday 24th October
quotequote all
Slippydiff said:
I ran a TTRS Plus (slightly more powerful 360hp engine, sports exhaust , and some bling carbon trim in the engine bay) for 8 months 4 years ago.
....

Dislikes :

The seats. Probably the most uncomfortable, unsupportive, hard, slidey seats I've ever had the misfortune to sit in. OP, those aren’t bucket seats BTW.
The TTRS could be optioned with a far more supportive and enveloping, not too mention, sporty seat :



I’m not sure what Audi were thinking of when they put the “standard” seats into a car such as the TTRS which is capable of generating such impressive lateral G (and so effortlessly). Surely you’d just fit the option seat as standard to differentiate the RS from the other, less sporty models ?

A seat manufacturing friend told me the standard Audi leather has a hard/stiff plasticky foam backing that makes it very hard (it reduced wrinkling) the downside is it doesn't mould around/too you, and in turn it doesn't support you. Not ideal in this application.

....

Edited by Slippydiff on Thursday 24th October 17:06
Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

So, the standard seats are awful for comfort....but the optional bucket seats fix this problem?
(I know you threw in other seats, but l'd rather look at OEM options first)




Also, would it be fair to assume the engine on this generation is fairly bulletproof? Many are tuned and generally appear fine?








s m

18,248 posts

151 months

Thursday 24th October
quotequote all
Slippydiff said:
I ran a TTRS Plus (It had a slightly more powerful 360hp engine, sports exhaust , and some bling carbon trim in the engine bay) for 8 months 4 years ago.
What a great post! thumbup

For me, stuff likes this makes the place worth visiting

Thanks for the effort smile

(Didn’t quote the whole ‘article’!!! )

Trevor555

1,310 posts

32 months

Thursday 24th October
quotequote all
s m said:
Slippydiff said:
I ran a TTRS Plus (It had a slightly more powerful 360hp engine, sports exhaust , and some bling carbon trim in the engine bay) for 8 months 4 years ago.
What a great post! thumbup

For me, stuff likes this makes the place worth visiting

Thanks for the effort smile

(Didn’t quote the whole ‘article’!!! )
+1

Thanks from me also, great post, and a lovely looking car.

JaredVannett

841 posts

91 months

Thursday 24th October
quotequote all
s m said:
(Didn’t quote the whole ‘article’!!! )
I quoted 'exactly' what I wanted to ask him about, not the whole article.

Time to update your Christmas Wishlist.

s m

18,248 posts

151 months

Thursday 24th October
quotequote all
JaredVannett said:
s m said:
(Didn’t quote the whole ‘article’!!! )
I quoted 'exactly' what I wanted to ask him about, not the whole article.

Time to update your Christmas Wishlist.
It wasn’t a dig at you if that’s what you thought

For anyone reading my post in isolation I added that so my comment didn’t come over in a sarcastic way, that’s why I said I hadn’t quoted the whole ‘article’

Edited by s m on Thursday 24th October 20:39

Leins

6,933 posts

96 months

Thursday 24th October
quotequote all
Another one here to say thanks for that post Slippy

Interesting to note the value difference these days between the Audi and the aforementioned 1M

Niffty951

1,835 posts

176 months

Thursday 24th October
quotequote all
Trevor555 said:
s m said:
Slippydiff said:
I ran a TTRS Plus (It had a slightly more powerful 360hp engine, sports exhaust , and some bling carbon trim in the engine bay) for 8 months 4 years ago.
What a great post! thumbup

For me, stuff likes this makes the place worth visiting

Thanks for the effort smile

(Didn’t quote the whole ‘article’!!! )
+1

Thanks from me also, great post, and a lovely looking car.
+2 very comprehensive review.

I also made that same mistake in Wales. A road I thought I knew, but obviously not well enough. I was sure it was opening out onto a straight so hard on the throttle through the apex only to realise it was a different bend.. a double apex and the second was a 90deg tightening. The road dropped slightly and so did my stomach, I had no option but to stab the brakes knowing it would upset the car.

The car snapped the rear around instantly and facing 90deg to the road with an arm and a half of lock on. My brain worked double time to keep up with the changing events and I had just enough time to wind the lock off as my brain processed the feeling that I'd caught it and I knew oh **** it's going to snap back hard.. got the lock off with just a little twitch as the suspension unloaded and having scrubbed a chunk of speed off with the slide I made it out the other side.

I lived to fight another day that one but learnt that committing to the throttle before you can see the exit is best left to track driving!

Slippydiff

10,664 posts

171 months

Friday 25th October
quotequote all
JaredVannett said:
Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

So, the standard seats are awful for comfort....but the optional bucket seats fix this problem?
(I know you threw in other seats, but l'd rather look at OEM options first)




Also, would it be fair to assume the engine on this generation is fairly bulletproof? Many are tuned and generally appear fine?
The option seats are considerably more comfortable and supportive than the standard items, you tent to sit more in them, than on them too.
Not many cars had them optioned, but it’s worth getting a car with them, as they don’t seem to command much, if any, premium.

The standard engine is very strong, there were some issues with the earliest cars, but Audi subsequently addressed them.

An uprated high pressure fuel pump, bigger intercooler, a less restrictive exhaust downpipe and a better flowing cat (or a decat) along with a good bespoke remap, will provide you with a bullet proof, reliable 420 + hp (and a very quick car indeed).

A map alone (by someone such as MRC) will see car the car running at 400hp reliably.

Personally I’d concentrate on the chassis, tyres, brakes before looking for additional horsepower.

jonesey

594 posts

143 months

Friday 25th October
quotequote all
I had one for a few years, bought with 3000 miles on the clock 1year old warranted from a main dealer. The only issue i had was a twisted rear propshaft- although I was told they’d not seen that happen before so I think it was just luck of the draw.

Loved it- still my wife’s favorite car.

LJ

BenLowden

1,879 posts

125 months

PH Marketing Bloke

Friday 25th October
quotequote all
Slippydiff said:
I ran a TTRS Plus (It had a slightly more powerful 360hp engine, sports exhaust , and some bling carbon trim in the engine bay) for 8 months 4 years ago...
What a fantastic and informative post, thank you! Sorry to hear about your misfortune, happens to the best of us. Will definitely be looking into the brakes upgrades and very interesting to read how it faired against your other cars.

JaredVannett said:
So, the standard seats are awful for comfort....but the optional bucket seats fix this problem?
Interestingly I've read quite a few people say the opposite, and that the optional buckets aren't comfortable on longer journeys and the bolsters wear badly. Personally I get on fine with the standard seats (also 5'11) – certainly not as supportive as a bucket and would be terrible on track, but then that's not really what I bought the car for.

The bolsters on the Recaros I had in the Clio 200 that the TT replaced were horrible for a daily drive whereas sliding in and out of the standard seats in the TT is a doddle. I've no doubt that fitting some Recaro Pole Position seats would make the drive significantly more engaging (I know from experience with my Megane 250), but at the cost of everyday comfort.