RE: BMW i4: 530hp, 372 miles of range confirmed

RE: BMW i4: 530hp, 372 miles of range confirmed

Monday 18th November

BMW i4: 530hp, 372 miles of range confirmed

2021 four-door Gran Coupe gets new high-voltage battery tech and can hit 62mph in 4.0 seconds



BMW has revealed that its all-electric i4 will develop 530hp, be capable of a 4.0 second 0-62mph time and have a range of 372 miles, providing the premium Gran Coupe-bodied EV a class-leading blend of performance and efficiency. The i4 will reach the market in 2021 using new high-voltage battery technology that will be shared with the forthcoming iX3, due next year. Both will feature an energy dense 80kWh cell that weighs 550kg.

Increased range is obviously the main advantage of the new battery - and the i4's ability to exceed 350 miles will be noted by Tesla and direct rival, Audi - but it is the claimed ability to reach 80 per cent charge in just 35 minutes that ought to distinguish it in the marketplace. BMW says a quick boost to 62 miles takes just six minutes.

Fast charge times are widely considered essential to achieving the much-discussed EV tipping point. The fifth-generation BMW eDrive tech inside the i4 will be applied to a range of future models as part of the firm's wider electrification plans, Significantly for the longevity of this plan, BMW is developing and producing the majority of its electric hardware in house, with a push for further development handled at the BMW Battery Cell Competence Centre in Munich. Expect the marque's line-up to look vastly different soon after the i4's arrival.


The i4 is still over a year away from arriving, but today's release of its vital statistics suggests the nitty gritty engineering work is at a very advanced stage. BMW has stopped short of detailing what it means by 'energy dense' when discussing the battery's configuration and there's no word yet as to what the i4's chassis itself will be made from; an extensive use of carbon fibre would no doubt help to counter the heft of the cells, but the firm's previous i models proved costly to make for that reason.

Images of the car cold weather testing suggest engineers are now turning their attention to the later stages of development. The official pictures show how the swept-back model's form is not too dissimilar to a 4 Series Gran Coupe's. That's not surprising, given the combustion engine model sells well globally, including in BMW's key markets, China and the US. Deploying an all-electric car in this class, backed by a compact SUV, makes perfect business sense; the greater sales volume offering the firm a better chance of absorbing its costs than a city and sports car did in the last decade.

Of course, there are still many unanswered questions relating to the i4, including what wheels will be driven by the motors and whether those aforementioned numbers are applied to one car or are representative of the best compromise across different variants. However, as far as early statistics go, they suggest BMW is set to make quite an impact in the world of electric mobility in the next decade. That will, inevitably, also include the adoption of electrification in its performance range, too. But that's for another cold day...






Author
Discussion

Court_S

Original Poster:

1,549 posts

125 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
The pricing of this will be interesting given BMW’s adoption of a fictional RRP offset by contributions which get bigger.

It could help EV’s gain an awful lot of traction with a decent range and normal looks (well normal as far as BMW’s current styling allows for).

ntiz

974 posts

84 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
I’m really glad they are getting on with going electric and this sounds very impressive!

But one big problem! Were are you going to charge on a longer journey? There is only something like 5 100kw chargers in the UK outside of the Tesla supercharger network.

Which could limit it somewhat.

Ares

8,907 posts

68 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
Pricing will be key, but even at M3 money, that would be a major ripple across the EV sector, and beyond.

Ares

8,907 posts

68 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
ntiz said:
I’m really glad they are getting on with going electric and this sounds very impressive!

But one big problem! Were are you going to charge on a longer journey? There is only something like 5 100kw chargers in the UK outside of the Tesla supercharger network.

Which could limit it somewhat.
If 370mile range is realistic, mid-journey charge verges on irrelevant.

Greg the Fish

892 posts

14 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
Trying too hard to disguise that hideous front end.

Who in their right mind would take one of these over a Tesla?

Dave Hedgehog

11,871 posts

152 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
Greg the Fish said:
Trying too hard to disguise that hideous front end.

Who in their right mind would take one of these over a Tesla?
its going to have a stupid giant front grill isnt it lol

thelostboy

3,657 posts

173 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
Greg the Fish said:
Trying too hard to disguise that hideous front end.

Who in their right mind would take one of these over a Tesla?
Tesla's downside is their interior quality. It is like comparing a Corvette to a 911.

It is interesting that more challengers are going to come out, but is infrastructure going to be able to cope? At the moment you get a few token spaces for electric cars. At the moment it only seems to work for people who commute, but don't do big trips (which I appreciate is most people).

ntiz

974 posts

84 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
Greg the Fish said:
Trying too hard to disguise that hideous front end.

Who in their right mind would take one of these over a Tesla?
Anyone sane??

People who like cars that handle.
Stop properly
Built properly.
Don’t like systems crashing
Something approaching customer service

I could go for quite a while.

Before you call me a hater I’m a 2x Tesla Model S owner. Only reason you buy the Tesla is for the charging network.


UnderSteerD

108 posts

130 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
ntiz said:
Anyone sane??

People who like cars that handle.
Stop properly
Built properly.
Don’t like systems crashing
Something approaching customer service

I could go for quite a while.

Before you call me a hater I’m a 2x Tesla Model S owner. Only reason you buy the Tesla is for the charging network.
You're using your experience of older Tesla models to draw comparison with something that doesn't yet exist.

2021 is a long time away.

9k rpm

162 posts

158 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
I really think cars like these will be the tipping point for the EV market for the following reasons:
- Available to buy in most towns via an established generally reputable dealer network
- Well built (well better than the Tesla)
- Brand awareness/loyalty/not run by a nutter
- Range that’s equal to an average petrol fuel tank
- Excellent performance

I for one will be very interested in it as a future purchase and it would be my first EV. I don’t do trips over 300 miles ever, my commute ranges between an 80 and 160 mile round trip and I don’t want to faff about looking for a charging point.

Admittedly I’m probably the ideal customer, have a driveway etc and some won’t but I’m actually quite excited about the future now this type of EV are on the horizon.

I just hope the price isn’t stupid........

Ares

8,907 posts

68 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
Greg the Fish said:
Who in their right mind would take one of these over a Tesla?
Someone who likes driving, and likes how a BMW feels/drives/handles?

Porsche were doing a Press Launch of the Taycan last month in Majorca. We got talking to some of those who had driven (and desperately tried to bag a drive..), the one thing they all said was that it drives more like a Porsche than a Tesla.

Tesla's biggest problem, for many, is that it doesn't 'drive'. It is boringly competent, and once you have gotten over the thrill of Ludicrous acceleration, there's not much left to enjoy.

If BMW can 'BMW' and EV in the same was Porsche can 'Porsche' an EV, then the market will explode if the financials work.

irocfan

21,269 posts

138 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
thelostboy said:
Tesla's downside is their interior quality. It is like comparing a Corvette to a 911.
not quite - the 'Vette is appreciably cheaper than a 911. A tesla isn't cheap...

Dave Hedgehog

11,871 posts

152 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
UnderSteerD said:
ntiz said:
Anyone sane??

People who like cars that handle.
Stop properly
Built properly.
Don’t like systems crashing
Something approaching customer service

I could go for quite a while.

Before you call me a hater I’m a 2x Tesla Model S owner. Only reason you buy the Tesla is for the charging network.
You're using your experience of older Tesla models to draw comparison with something that doesn't yet exist.

2021 is a long time away.
its not even a comparison to the model 3 let alone a future BMW

Wills2

16,243 posts

123 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
Greg the Fish said:
Trying too hard to disguise that hideous front end.

Who in their right mind would take one of these over a Tesla?
Loads of people like me, when I go electric it'll be a BMW I don't want a Tesla or Merc or an Audi or Jag, BMW sell millions of cars a year already...who do you think they sell them to now?



Edited by Wills2 on Monday 18th November 16:21

Jon_S_Rally

663 posts

36 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
The thing that irks me about cars like this is the use of a separate platform. Of course the architecture needs of an EV can be rather different to that of an ICE car, but making an EV platform and an ICE platform seems massively inefficient. Finding ways to fit EV powertrains/batteries into existing vehicles, or developing single platforms that can support both (or a combination) would seem much more sensible to me. It's clear that ICE and hybrid cars are going to play a role for some time yet, so why not just offer platforms that can do all three? Hyundai have done it with the IONIQ which, although a bit of a minger, seems a really sensible way forward.

The EV I and many others want is still very much a normal car, without the token space-age looks, but with normal styling, normal equipment, normal interior space, normal range and normal performance. It just seems to me that, sadly, many of the EVs coming out at the moment are as much a virtue-signalling marketing exercise as they are a serious transport proposition.


9k rpm

162 posts

158 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
Jon_S_Rally said:
The thing that irks me about cars like this is the use of a separate platform. Of course the architecture needs of an EV can be rather different to that of an ICE car, but making an EV platform and an ICE platform seems massively inefficient. Finding ways to fit EV powertrains/batteries into existing vehicles, or developing single platforms that can support both (or a combination) would seem much more sensible to me. It's clear that ICE and hybrid cars are going to play a role for some time yet, so why not just offer platforms that can do all three? Hyundai have done it with the IONIQ which, although a bit of a minger, seems a really sensible way forward.

The EV I and many others want is still very much a normal car, without the token space-age looks, but with normal styling, normal equipment, normal interior space, normal range and normal performance. It just seems to me that, sadly, many of the EVs coming out at the moment are as much a virtue-signalling marketing exercise as they are a serious transport proposition.
I’m pretty sure the iX3 uses the same (new) platform as the ICE X3 and it was designed specifically for the purpose of dual power train use.

CrossMember

1,562 posts

87 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
"Both will feature an energy dense 80kWh cell that weighs 550kg"

145Wh per kg. That's pretty rubbish. Tesla batteries are already over 200Wh/kg, and so the i4 is 3 or 4 years out of date by the time it launches.

Not impressed really.


ntiz

974 posts

84 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
Dave Hedgehog said:
UnderSteerD said:
ntiz said:
Anyone sane??

People who like cars that handle.
Stop properly
Built properly.
Don’t like systems crashing
Something approaching customer service

I could go for quite a while.

Before you call me a hater I’m a 2x Tesla Model S owner. Only reason you buy the Tesla is for the charging network.
You're using your experience of older Tesla models to draw comparison with something that doesn't yet exist.

2021 is a long time away.
its not even a comparison to the model 3 let alone a future BMW
Considering the huge strides Tesla haven’t made the last 4 years I don’t expect anything to change.

They still aren’t built well. Still don’t drive well. The software still crashes and they still don’t drive well beynd straight line oomph. Customer service has actually got worse.


LimaDelta

4,126 posts

166 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
I'm less than 6 months into i3 ownership, but would definitely consider something bigger and longer-legged if it was on offer. Not that range has been an issue so far for us, but it does kind of limit our choice of car on certain journeys.

I do hope they maintain the quirky 'i' styling though. If it looks and feel like a normal 4 series that will be a bit of a turn-off for me (though I can see how it make it more appealing for other people).

Andy20vt

1,015 posts

134 months

Monday 18th November
quotequote all
The beginning of the end for Tesla