RE: Lotus design boss on Evija | Time for Tea

RE: Lotus design boss on Evija | Time for Tea

Friday 22nd May

Lotus design boss on Evija | Time for Tea

Russell Carr explains the thinking behind the EV hypercar's standout styling



The Evija isn’t just significant because it’s Lotus's first EV or its most powerful car yet. It’s significant because it heralds an all-new chapter for the brand, one which will eventually feature electric cars exclusively. Recent comments from CEO Phil Popham suggested that the last ICE Lotus is incoming soon, so the Evija really is the future of Lotus.

As such, the aerodynamic details of the 1,190hp-per-tonne hypercar – designed by Lotus design director Russell Carr – could very well trickle down into less extreme Lotuses of the future. In a new video, he talks us through the thinking behind both the form and function of the car’s body, which sits just 105mm above the ground to maximise downforce, and reveals a few new secrets on the way, too.

Predictably, the Evija’s 2,000hp electric powertrain has provided extensive freedom for Carr, so you can see why he’s so enthusiastic about non-ICE-powered Lotuses. And while the prospect of a two-pedal Lotus will send a shiver down the spine of some, there are at least some real, Chapman-esque advantages in the use of compactly packaged EV motors.

Whatever form future Lotus’s take, at least the likes of Carr will be on hand to keep them true to the philosophy. On that note, over to the man himself…

Author
Discussion

oedipus

Original Poster:

29 posts

20 months

Friday 22nd May
quotequote all
Unless I missed it, he managed to get through the thing without having to deal with the issue of how you pronouce 'Evija'.

flukey5

91 posts

14 months

Friday 22nd May
quotequote all
I'm still finding it difficult to see how the Evija and the electric future of Lotus fits into their brand ethos.

Lotus is about manual-feeling back to basics cars that focus on driving dynamics through light weight and simplicity. I find it difficult to believe that heavy batteries are (currently) the way forward in this way of thinking. Lotus hasn't really been about raw power, just power to weight.

This thing weighs ~1700kg, and that's using all the carbon fiber and advanced materials they can throw at it... it weighs 2x Elises.

As everyone always says, the one thing you can't change are the laws of physics.

I wish Lotus the best of luck and I want them to succeed. Obviously their current business model needs to change, it's just a shame to see as an enthusiast of their current mantra.


wab172uk

1,657 posts

181 months

Friday 22nd May
quotequote all
flukey5 said:
I'm still finding it difficult to see how the Evija and the electric future of Lotus fits into their brand ethos.

Lotus is about manual-feeling back to basics cars that focus on driving dynamics through light weight and simplicity. I find it difficult to believe that heavy batteries are (currently) the way forward in this way of thinking. Lotus hasn't really been about raw power, just power to weight.

This thing weighs ~1700kg, and that's using all the carbon fiber and advanced materials they can throw at it... it weighs 2x Elises.

As everyone always says, the one thing you can't change are the laws of physics.

I wish Lotus the best of luck and I want them to succeed. Obviously their current business model needs to change, it's just a shame to see as an enthusiast of their current mantra.
Think it's more a jumping on the "Lets build a 1000bhp+ Hypercar to sell for silly money to people with silly amounts of money"

Money corrupts ethos every time.

Now build a new Elise that looks like the Evija, and you have my attention.

ManyMotors

59 posts

52 months

Friday 22nd May
quotequote all
Lotus Engineering seems to have hope. Lotus Cars, facing a difficult market with inferior product, seems destined for failure. Of course, this has likely been written before....

blueg33

23,593 posts

178 months

Friday 22nd May
quotequote all
flukey5 said:
I'm still finding it difficult to see how the Evija and the electric future of Lotus fits into their brand ethos.

Lotus is about manual-feeling back to basics cars that focus on driving dynamics through light weight and simplicity. I find it difficult to believe that heavy batteries are (currently) the way forward in this way of thinking. Lotus hasn't really been about raw power, just power to weight.

This thing weighs ~1700kg, and that's using all the carbon fiber and advanced materials they can throw at it... it weighs 2x Elises.

As everyone always says, the one thing you can't change are the laws of physics.

I wish Lotus the best of luck and I want them to succeed. Obviously their current business model needs to change, it's just a shame to see as an enthusiast of their current mantra.
Its low weight for its power train and has loads of power - so power to weight is good

A Mcl P1 or a La Ferrari have much smaller batteries and are only about 100kg lighter and half about half the power.

The Rimac is 1950kg









Jellinek

244 posts

229 months

Friday 22nd May
quotequote all
Such is the continued media drive, my impression is Lotus has not yet sold all 130 slots, a concern given the low volumes involved. And I’m pretty sure they will need to sell all 130 slots to justify the loss leader / halo product rationale.

blueg33

23,593 posts

178 months

Friday 22nd May
quotequote all
Jellinek said:
Such is the continued media drive, my impression is Lotus has not yet sold all 130 slots, a concern given the low volumes involved. And I’m pretty sure they will need to sell all 130 slots to justify the loss leader / halo product rationale.
I dont agree

I sold everyone of my prototype houses last year before they were finished - i still use them in marketing collateral

Max_Torque

14,970 posts

171 months

Friday 22nd May
quotequote all
flukey5 said:
I'm still finding it difficult to see how the Evija and the electric future of Lotus fits into their brand ethos.
Question: Should a company sacrifice itself on the alter of its Heritage?

For 100 Years, John Fowler & Co. built these:




Arguably the finest, best engineered, most capable steam Traction engines in the world. There reputation was second to none. But, they failed to evolve, to embrace change and when the sales of steam Traction engines dried up, replaced by much more convienient and powerful internal combustion engined machinery, there company withered and died.



Today, in 2020, can i suggest that "light weight ethos" means virtually nothing in the passenger car market. The market for the ultimate lightweight car, where everything is sacrificed in the name of low mass is gone, just like the market for Steam Traction engines is........


kainedog

343 posts

128 months

Friday 22nd May
quotequote all
Lotus appeal to me more than any Aston Martins

NewUsername

495 posts

10 months

Friday 22nd May
quotequote all
flukey5 said:
I'm still finding it difficult to see how the Evija and the electric future of Lotus fits into their brand ethos.

Lotus is about manual-feeling back to basics cars that focus on driving dynamics through light weight and simplicity. I find it difficult to believe that heavy batteries are (currently) the way forward in this way of thinking. Lotus hasn't really been about raw power, just power to weight.

This thing weighs ~1700kg, and that's using all the carbon fiber and advanced materials they can throw at it... it weighs 2x Elises.

As everyone always says, the one thing you can't change are the laws of physics.

I wish Lotus the best of luck and I want them to succeed. Obviously their current business model needs to change, it's just a shame to see as an enthusiast of their current mantra.
Which other 1000bhp plus electric cars weigh less?

chelme

881 posts

124 months

Friday 22nd May
quotequote all
Max_Torque said:
flukey5 said:
I'm still finding it difficult to see how the Evija and the electric future of Lotus fits into their brand ethos.
Question: Should a company sacrifice itself on the alter of its Heritage?

For 100 Years, John Fowler & Co. built these:




Arguably the finest, best engineered, most capable steam Traction engines in the world. There reputation was second to none. But, they failed to evolve, to embrace change and when the sales of steam Traction engines dried up, replaced by much more convienient and powerful internal combustion engined machinery, there company withered and died.



Today, in 2020, can i suggest that "lightweightethos" means virtually nothing in the passenger car market. The market for the ultimate lightweight car, where everything is sacrificed in the name of low mass is gone, just like the market for Steam Traction engines is........
Good point.

However, I'd be surprised if they sold many of these. Whilst manufacturing is evolving, are people changing their desires of what they want from sports cars/hypercars?

Why is a Ferrari La Ferrari holding it's value/selling for significantly more than other less emotive hypercars? It's arguably because of its V12 engine.

I'm not so sure many people are ready for a silent hypercar yet.

Max_Torque

14,970 posts

171 months

Friday 22nd May
quotequote all
chelme said:
Good point.

However, I'd be surprised if they sold many of these. Whilst manufacturing is evolving, are people changing their desires of what they want from sports cars/hypercars?

Why is a Ferrari La Ferrari holding it's value/selling for significantly more than other less emotive hypercars? It's arguably because of its V12 engine.

I'm not so sure many people are ready for a silent hypercar yet.
In the LaLa's case, there is much more to it than with Lotus. Ferrari are (arguably) the worlds most famous maker of purely "sporting" cars, and are known, in fact revered for their multicylinder internal combustion engines (V8 & V12).

Lotus, haven't recently used their own engine, so there is less heritage to loose, and they are not actually known for their engines, rather for their chassis. i mean, who buys an Elise for its K series or Toyota engine?

flukey5

91 posts

14 months

Saturday 23rd May
quotequote all
blueg33 said:
Its low weight for its power train and has loads of power - so power to weight is good

A Mcl P1 or a La Ferrari have much smaller batteries and are only about 100kg lighter and half about half the power.

The Rimac is 1950kg
Is it really about the horsepower? Do any of lotus' current cars feel underpowered? This is just another big figure d!ck waving contest really. 2k hp - Is there even a road tyre that can properly support that sort of torque and power?

People have been building Supras with 2000 hp for a while now... I bet they don't cost nearly 2M to build, and they're all one-offs. Would you want a 2000 hp supra instead of a La Ferrari or a P1? No, probably not.

flukey5

91 posts

14 months

Saturday 23rd May
quotequote all
Max_Torque said:
Question: Should a company sacrifice itself on the alter of its Heritage?

For 100 Years, John Fowler & Co. built these:




Arguably the finest, best engineered, most capable steam Traction engines in the world. There reputation was second to none. But, they failed to evolve, to embrace change and when the sales of steam Traction engines dried up, replaced by much more convienient and powerful internal combustion engined machinery, there company withered and died.



Today, in 2020, can i suggest that "light weight ethos" means virtually nothing in the passenger car market. The market for the ultimate lightweight car, where everything is sacrificed in the name of low mass is gone, just like the market for Steam Traction engines is........
Meanwhile Morgan have been pumping out the same car for 80 years, but that wasn't my point. This isn't about pumping out the same thing, it's about trying to follow your brand ethos. In the UK more than many other markets that's a big thing.

Would people buy a Rolls Royce that sacrificed all luxury for speed? probably not.
Would people buy a Porsche with a flat 4 instead of a flat 6? Looks like they aren't from how the 718 has been going.
Will people buy a Toyota supra that's basically a BMW and doesn't have a manual? No, they want a Toyota and that's why less than 80/month have sold in the last 5 months... in all of Europe

When I buy a Snickers, I expect nuts! If I buy a Lotus (which I genuinely plan on doing soon) I expect it to be the most enjoyable, most nimble car on the road that isn't hampered by modern electronic systems.

I'm sure if Tesla released this, it would do well - cue the Tesla roadster, and I agree that Lotus need to diversify to expand, but modern battery technology is a polar opposite to their current brand values. I'm sure as the technology evolves this will improve.

One day I think we'll look back at all these fat 2 tonne battery barges with our solid state batteries in the same way we look back at our old phones. Cool for the time but no emotional connection. This tech is changing so fast that cars will probably be obsolete in just a decade.



Edited by flukey5 on Saturday 23 May 01:57

Noesph

960 posts

103 months

Saturday 23rd May
quotequote all
oedipus said:
Unless I missed it, he managed to get through the thing without having to deal with the issue of how you pronouce 'Evija'.
I keep thinking eejit when I see it.

"Will that feckin eejit in the lotus ejjit move out the way!"

Cold

8,835 posts

44 months

Saturday 23rd May
quotequote all
Noesph said:
I keep thinking eejit when I see it.

"Will that feckin eejit in the lotus ejjit move out the way!"
Interesting. I wonder you'd have to be driving to be flashing a 2000bhp Lotus out of the way. biggrin

rodericb

2,042 posts

80 months

Saturday 23rd May
quotequote all
Max_Torque said:
Question: Should a company sacrifice itself on the alter of its Heritage?

For 100 Years, John Fowler & Co. built these:




Arguably the finest, best engineered, most capable steam Traction engines in the world. There reputation was second to none. But, they failed to evolve, to embrace change and when the sales of steam Traction engines dried up, replaced by much more convienient and powerful internal combustion engined machinery, there company withered and died.

Today, in 2020, can i suggest that "light weight ethos" means virtually nothing in the passenger car market. The market for the ultimate lightweight car, where everything is sacrificed in the name of low mass is gone, just like the market for Steam Traction engines is........
The light weight ethos built cars are probably difficult to build due to cost and regulations and if losing weight isn't what people want in their cars then why do manufacturers pump out lightened versions of some of their models, charge more money for them and people buy them?

blueg33

23,593 posts

178 months

Saturday 23rd May
quotequote all
flukey5 said:
blueg33 said:
Its low weight for its power train and has loads of power - so power to weight is good

A Mcl P1 or a La Ferrari have much smaller batteries and are only about 100kg lighter and half about half the power.

The Rimac is 1950kg
Is it really about the horsepower? Do any of lotus' current cars feel underpowered? This is just another big figure d!ck waving contest really. 2k hp - Is there even a road tyre that can properly support that sort of torque and power?

People have been building Supras with 2000 hp for a while now... I bet they don't cost nearly 2M to build, and they're all one-offs. Would you want a 2000 hp supra instead of a La Ferrari or a P1? No, probably not.
It’s a response to the previous comment that it should be about power to weight. I was pointing out that it meets that metric

blueg33

23,593 posts

178 months

Saturday 23rd May
quotequote all
flukey5 said:
Max_Torque said:
Question: Should a company sacrifice itself on the alter of its Heritage?

For 100 Years, John Fowler & Co. built these:




Arguably the finest, best engineered, most capable steam Traction engines in the world. There reputation was second to none. But, they failed to evolve, to embrace change and when the sales of steam Traction engines dried up, replaced by much more convienient and powerful internal combustion engined machinery, there company withered and died.



Today, in 2020, can i suggest that "light weight ethos" means virtually nothing in the passenger car market. The market for the ultimate lightweight car, where everything is sacrificed in the name of low mass is gone, just like the market for Steam Traction engines is........
Meanwhile Morgan have been pumping out the same car for 80 years, but that wasn't my point. This isn't about pumping out the same thing, it's about trying to follow your brand ethos. In the UK more than many other markets that's a big thing.

Would people buy a Rolls Royce that sacrificed all luxury for speed? probably not.
Would people buy a Porsche with a flat 4 instead of a flat 6? Looks like they aren't from how the 718 has been going.
Will people buy a Toyota supra that's basically a BMW and doesn't have a manual? No, they want a Toyota and that's why less than 80/month have sold in the last 5 months... in all of Europe

When I buy a Snickers, I expect nuts! If I buy a Lotus (which I genuinely plan on doing soon) I expect it to be the most enjoyable, most nimble car on the road that isn't hampered by modern electronic systems.

I'm sure if Tesla released this, it would do well - cue the Tesla roadster, and I agree that Lotus need to diversify to expand, but modern battery technology is a polar opposite to their current brand values. I'm sure as the technology evolves this will improve.

One day I think we'll look back at all these fat 2 tonne battery barges with our solid state batteries in the same way we look back at our old phones. Cool for the time but no emotional connection. This tech is changing so fast that cars will probably be obsolete in just a decade.



Edited by flukey5 on Saturday 23 May 01:57
Morgan have changed their cars significantly

Many models use bonded aluminium chassis, they all use modern engines and drive trains.

They also appeal to people who want retro at the expense of dynamics and performance. They really are a curio.

A1VDY

2,129 posts

81 months

Saturday 23rd May
quotequote all
Cold said:
Noesph said:
I keep thinking eejit when I see it.

"Will that feckin eejit in the lotus ejjit move out the way!"
Interesting. I wonder you'd have to be driving to be flashing a 2000bhp Lotus out of the way. biggrin
Any car would do, it'd be more like flashing the Lotus as you're dodging the bits falling off and finally negotiating your way around it when it finally expires.
Guaranteed to have major flaws.

Ps, I have a lotus.. wink