Who has the best Garage on Pistonheads????

Who has the best Garage on Pistonheads????

Author
Discussion

Bebee

4,340 posts

166 months

Wednesday 17th April
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RichB said:
Mustang Baz said:
That's a really smart garage MB. I am particularly interested in the ceiling is finished. Is it plasterboard tacked onto the rafters?

MOved house a couple of years ago and now I have a triple garage which is great but I am yet to sort out inside. I will likely just paint the floor light grey (from past experience I'm happy enough with a painted finish) but I hate the ceiling, it's so dark and gloomy. As you may be able to see it's just the black roof lining tar paper under the tiles. I don't want to put in a low flat ceiling because I like the impression of height given by the exposed trusses. I know they're not real oak beams like yours but I wondered about boarding onto the rafters and painting it white and perhaps painting the trusses grey to smarten it up.

We're getting there with the garden, builders do the bathrooms so hopefully soon I'll be able to sort out the garage :-)



I would plaster board the ceiling, tape it and paint it if on a budget, or have it plastered with some down lighters, I love those bricks and will look even better with some auto related pics on it. I much prefer the boarded ceiling, it's warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer, and less for the dehumidifier to do, and less dusty, it not like it's a trad purlin roof anyway.......nothing to see here, and just to add, with a loft opening in you're able to store items up there.

bertie

7,930 posts

225 months

Wednesday 17th April
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RichB said:
suffolk009 said:
Nail some plasterboard or T&G boarding onto the rafters. Then paint it all white.
Yes that's what I am thinking too, cheapest T&G I can buy and a nail gun. Probably paint it white outside in the grass before I nail it up. scratchchin
Because I wanted something a bit more impact and moisture resistant I used ply rather than plasterboard then painted.

Finish isn’t quite as good as plastering though

Jonny TVR

2,415 posts

222 months

Thursday 18th April
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I've been pondering the same on mine. At the moment its all open and you get a lot of dust, moisture, birds and its very dark. It wouldn't take too long to plasterboard and I could put some insulation up there too and decent lighting.



suffolk009

3,950 posts

106 months

Thursday 18th April
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Jonny TVR said:
I've been pondering the same on mine. At the moment its all open and you get a lot of dust, moisture, birds and its very dark. It wouldn't take too long to plasterboard and I could put some insulation up there too and decent lighting.
You can get plasterboard with insulation pre-stuck on the back of it. Much thinner than the normal sort of rockwool (it's closed cell - like styrofoam) and fairly thin.

Storer

4,930 posts

156 months

Thursday 18th April
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When you have installed what ever you chose to cover the tar paper and painted it white, I would then install uplighters above the joists. This will reflect off your new white paint and remove the ‘gloom’.
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RichB

41,558 posts

225 months

Thursday 18th April
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Storer said:
When you have installed what ever you chose to cover the tar paper and painted it white, I would then install uplighters above the joists. This will reflect off your new white paint and remove the ‘gloom’.
smile

S1KRR

10,116 posts

153 months

Friday 19th April
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Mustang Baz said:
A personal bucket list moment with the completion of our triple-garage project - never had one before so it was worth waiting, specc'ing and building it correctly. 5 month build, albeit over winter with all the usual delays.

Overall, I am delighted with the outcome. Key learnings were that lots of time up-front planning (even down to the small details) is worth its weight, high quality surveyors/engineers and builders - a well as tight weekly management of the process (and details) – are essential; but also that small, not necessarily large-cost "quality" touches can make a major difference at the end of the day in the overall look, feel and use. We don’t regret any of the decisions we made, which were made with one eye on the functional use of the garage, but arguably an even bigger eye on how the garage “sat” vs the rest of the house/home.

Key specification points were;

- Very restrictive foundation options given near-by tree roots; raft/pile used
- Brick build in flemish bond, heritage brick with slate roof (to match house/accord to planning and quality feel)
- One double door of 4.9-5m width; one single door of 2.8-2.9m width
- Internal width of garage no less than 5.9m to allow c40-50mm either end of a 5m max car
- Bi-fold Accoya doors (which took a long time to source in a cost-effective, quality way)
- Porcelain ceramic tiles (used Dotti R9's, a good adhesive and electric underfloor heating mat)
- Oak feature joists from local timber
- Electrics/lighting sourced from domestic lighting providers vs "outdoor" retailers - a minefield of temptation and possible expense!

Clearly some of the above are much more about aesthetics/"value" than pure use as a garage smile

Great build.

Nice to see a 2+1 door set up

BigR

132 posts

103 months

Saturday 20th April
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S1KRR said:
Mustang Baz said:
A personal bucket list moment with the completion of our triple-garage project - never had one before so it was worth waiting, specc'ing and building it correctly. 5 month build, albeit over winter with all the usual delays.

Overall, I am delighted with the outcome. Key learnings were that lots of time up-front planning (even down to the small details) is worth its weight, high quality surveyors/engineers and builders - a well as tight weekly management of the process (and details) – are essential; but also that small, not necessarily large-cost "quality" touches can make a major difference at the end of the day in the overall look, feel and use. We don’t regret any of the decisions we made, which were made with one eye on the functional use of the garage, but arguably an even bigger eye on how the garage “sat” vs the rest of the house/home.

Key specification points were;

- Very restrictive foundation options given near-by tree roots; raft/pile used
- Brick build in flemish bond, heritage brick with slate roof (to match house/accord to planning and quality feel)
- One double door of 4.9-5m width; one single door of 2.8-2.9m width
- Internal width of garage no less than 5.9m to allow c40-50mm either end of a 5m max car
- Bi-fold Accoya doors (which took a long time to source in a cost-effective, quality way)
- Porcelain ceramic tiles (used Dotti R9's, a good adhesive and electric underfloor heating mat)
- Oak feature joists from local timber
- Electrics/lighting sourced from domestic lighting providers vs "outdoor" retailers - a minefield of temptation and possible expense!

Clearly some of the above are much more about aesthetics/"value" than pure use as a garage smile

Great build.

Nice to see a 2+1 door set up
Lovely looking but my OCD struggles with a 2+1 because...because... there's not equal spacing!!!!!!!!!!

Stang5oh

28 posts

137 months

Saturday 20th April
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I'm going to be starting my garage build sometime hopefully this summer.

I've got a 14m x 6.6m (45ft x 20ft) concrete plinth with a pit in it.Large enough for 4 cars and space to work around the cars.

it's currently covered in a single skin of corrugated iron and held up by telegraph poles and built probably around the mid 70s. it's fairly delapidated.

I plan on rebuilding it myself and will probably go for a steel framed, wood clad exterior.

Inside, white walls, LED strip lighting on the walls for detailing and working. Two post lift somewhere in there. A kitchenette and sofa area for manly chats and parties. A workbench area and I'll still keep the pit but have a jack on a rail like old MOT stations used to have.

It's an old farm that we have only owned for a year and I am danglies deep in renovating it all.

A finish like this is the dream, maybe with some wall hung LED panels


DoubleD

7,756 posts

49 months

Saturday 20th April
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That looks like a hospital corridor. Im not sure that I would want to spend ages in there washing a car.

Stang5oh

28 posts

137 months

Saturday 20th April
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DoubleD said:
That looks like a hospital corridor. Im not sure that I would want to spend ages in there washing a car.
It will be furnished with cupboards, roller tool boxes and cars. It shouldn't look so bleak.

Mustang Baz

1,589 posts

175 months

Saturday 20th April
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S1KRR said:
Great build.

Nice to see a 2+1 door set up
Much appreciated - wide enough to ensure easy two car access; once you go above 5m, apparently timber bi-folds get a little more tricky/weighty to use on a regular basis.

S1KRR

10,116 posts

153 months

Saturday 20th April
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BigR said:
Lovely looking but my OCD struggles with a 2+1 because...because... there's not equal spacing!!!!!!!!!!
laugh I know what you mean.

I view it that you can put your BEST car behind the 1 door (since it wont get used as often and it stops it being exposed every time you get a car out.

And put your everyday cars behind the 2 door. (His n Hers)

3 x 1 doors takes up space with the supports so makes the aperture narrower.

DoubleD

7,756 posts

49 months

Sunday 28th April
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Stang5oh said:
DoubleD said:
That looks like a hospital corridor. Im not sure that I would want to spend ages in there washing a car.
It will be furnished with cupboards, roller tool boxes and cars. It shouldn't look so bleak.
It will be interesting to see the finished project then.

Jonny TVR

2,415 posts

222 months

Sunday 28th April
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Edited by Jonny TVR on Sunday 28th April 20:47

poing

8,466 posts

141 months

Sunday 28th April
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Jonny TVR said:
Look how small the TVR looks!

TR4man

3,256 posts

115 months

Sunday 28th April
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Some lovely cars there JonnyTVR, but what is the story behind your Spitfire? Forgive me saying that it looks a little out of place compared with the others.

SCEtoAUX

1,466 posts

22 months

Sunday 28th April
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If anyone else wants bi-fold Accoya doors I know some very good people who make such things.

My garage by the way is not worthy of a photo and has no room for cars.

TheRingDing

27 posts

37 months

Sunday 28th April
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This thread has made me so jealous!!!!

Jonny TVR

2,415 posts

222 months

Monday 29th April
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TR4man said:
Some lovely cars there JonnyTVR, but what is the story behind your Spitfire? Forgive me saying that it looks a little out of place compared with the others.
Sentimental reasons. I had a very similar one for 5 years late teens to early twenties, then sold to my brother who kept it for 5 years and then a good friend of his who had it for 10 years. It was a key car and couldn't resist this immaculate one when I saw it. its smaller and slower than I remembered and even more uncomfortable! but brings back happy memories of belting around the Cheshire roads in it.