328 GTS/GTB

Author
Discussion

rdbrooksie

137 posts

151 months

Monday 29th August
quotequote all
m4tti said:
He probably thought you were laughing at his Lycra wrapped cocktail sausage and got all embarrassed. All he could think of doing was reacting in a “manly” way hehe
Haha probably!

4rephill

4,975 posts

162 months

Saturday 3rd September
quotequote all
rdbrooksie said:
..................... Went to pick my wife up from golf and was crawling along the road due to speed bumps and doing no more than 10-12 mph. Well below the speed limit for the road but enough to tackle the speed bumps. Then, on the opposite side of the road cycling in the usual Lycra pants came a cyclist who decided to hurl abuse towards us! Of course I wanted to turn round and confront the moron but the wife said no. What is wrong with these cyclists? I was doing nothing wrong. Oh well, didn’t let it spoil my drive out

Edited by rdbrooksie on Monday 29th August 15:24
Must be something about cyclists and Ferrari's!

When I owned my 348 TS, I was driving down a road in Letchworth that has a number of crossroads in a row every 200 yards or so, where I know people tend to ignore the give way signs/markings, and just pull out of the junctions or turn across you, without warning, so I was driving slowly down the road.

I had the roof panel out, tootling along, when I heard someone shout: "OI! - YOUR CAR'S SH*T!"

I looked across the road, and on the opposite side, there was a scruffy lad aged about 17, pushing a mountain bike along the pavement with a flat back tyre.

I shouted back at him: "IT'S BETTER THAN YOUR SH*T BIKE!", and went on my way.

theadman

441 posts

141 months

Friday 21st October
quotequote all
Having last contributed to this thread in 2014, I thought an update might be in order...

After 11 years of ownership my 328GTS is off to pastures new.



I've had a great experience with the car. Bought it with 6000 miles on the clock, fresh out of 20 years of storage. This should have been a recipe for disaster, but it simply wasn't.

New clutch (manufacturing defect, not wear), brake hoses, a couple of coolant hoses, a cam belt service, a thorough check over and off she went.

The car received positive comments wherever I took her, which surprised me a bit, to be honest. There was none of the Ferrari hatred I was sort of expecting. Everyone was genuinely interested in the car's story and those in the know were amazed that the car was still wearing its original paint, had its original interior, and still looked factory fresh.

The joy of the car was that it was low mileage, but after some careful use it was driving like only a well used car can. It was the best of both worlds!

10,000 miles later, the car never let me down and provided plenty of smiles per mile without the need for excessive speed. I never took the plunge and took her to the Alps, which was an ambition, but other than that I feel I made the most of the experience.



This was "Drive It Day' in April...130 mile tour of the Cotswolds which showed the car at its best...reasonable progress along interesting A and B roads.

So, why on earth have I let such a gem go?

Well, before the 328 I had a carb 308GTS. How can two outwardly similar cars be so different to drive?

The 328 was brilliant...I had no doubt it would start every time, it was great in traffic with really effective cooling, it had a handbrake that actually held the car on a gradient; it really was a painless experience. The only niggle was occasional first gear selection issues when cold. It was utterly reliable. But in a sense, that was also its downfall. For me driving it was enjoyable, rather than being an EVENT.

The other thing is that values have rocketed since I bought the 328. Although prices have fallen back in recent years the car is still worth what to me is an eye watering amount of money. As a significant part of the value of my car lay in the fact it was all original, I became increasingly reticent to use it. Surely, this defeats the whole object of having a Ferrari?

The earlier 308GTS was a bit of a pain to start with. I had lots of frustrating issues to deal with...coolant leaks, air locks in the cooling system that left me stranded on the M40, a broken throttle cable, porous oil pipes and other niggles. BUT it had real soul. Real soul to the point that a year after selling it I was on the lookout for another 308, preferably a GTB.

10 years later, in May this year I finally took the plunge and part exchanged the 328 against an early 308GTB that has had restoration work at least twice in its life, so is anything but original. It comes with over £100k of bills from top Ferrari specialists and therefore shouldn't need any major work for some years to come. However, it has only covered 5000 miles in the last 44 years (what a waste), having spent its time with owners who haven't really used it. So, as most of you would predict, I've been in a world of pain since buying it!

But, last month my ownership turned a corner. The Ferrari specialist I've used since buying that first 308 14 years ago has finally got the car running correctly.

OMG, what a car! Every journey is an event! The car is alive beneath you in a way the 328 simply wasn't (sorry, I know this is a 328 thread)! The throttle response, the induction roar, the go kart like handling, the exhaust rasp. Everything is like the 328 plus 20%. I love it so much, I've already had to increase the mileage on the insurance policy!

Last Sunday, on the spur of the moment, I drove to a car show, a 140 mile round trip with no issues other than aching cheeks from the permanent grin. Walked away with an award for best 70's car, which was unexpected (and frankly undeserved). I'm not sure I'd have made the effort in the 328, which is sad to admit.



However, the main point for this thread is that, whether you prefer 308s or 328s, they are both fantastic cars and seem to be so underrated, particularly in comparison with contemporary 911s. When you consider the relatively small numbers produced, the fact that the cars are rolling art, that they all drive so well and are fundamentally bulletproof, it seems as if we have all bought in to one of the sweet spots of the classic car world.

rat rod

4,515 posts

49 months

Saturday 22nd October
quotequote all
theadman said:
Having last contributed to this thread in 2014, I thought an update might be in order...

After 11 years of ownership my 328GTS is off to pastures new.



I've had a great experience with the car. Bought it with 6000 miles on the clock, fresh out of 20 years of storage. This should have been a recipe for disaster, but it simply wasn't.

New clutch (manufacturing defect, not wear), brake hoses, a couple of coolant hoses, a cam belt service, a thorough check over and off she went.

The car received positive comments wherever I took her, which surprised me a bit, to be honest. There was none of the Ferrari hatred I was sort of expecting. Everyone was genuinely interested in the car's story and those in the know were amazed that the car was still wearing its original paint, had its original interior, and still looked factory fresh.

The joy of the car was that it was low mileage, but after some careful use it was driving like only a well used car can. It was the best of both worlds!

10,000 miles later, the car never let me down and provided plenty of smiles per mile without the need for excessive speed. I never took the plunge and took her to the Alps, which was an ambition, but other than that I feel I made the most of the experience.



This was "Drive It Day' in April...130 mile tour of the Cotswolds which showed the car at its best...reasonable progress along interesting A and B roads.

So, why on earth have I let such a gem go?

Well, before the 328 I had a carb 308GTS. How can two outwardly similar cars be so different to drive?

The 328 was brilliant...I had no doubt it would start every time, it was great in traffic with really effective cooling, it had a handbrake that actually held the car on a gradient; it really was a painless experience. The only niggle was occasional first gear selection issues when cold. It was utterly reliable. But in a sense, that was also its downfall. For me driving it was enjoyable, rather than being an EVENT.

The other thing is that values have rocketed since I bought the 328. Although prices have fallen back in recent years the car is still worth what to me is an eye watering amount of money. As a significant part of the value of my car lay in the fact it was all original, I became increasingly reticent to use it. Surely, this defeats the whole object of having a Ferrari?

The earlier 308GTS was a bit of a pain to start with. I had lots of frustrating issues to deal with...coolant leaks, air locks in the cooling system that left me stranded on the M40, a broken throttle cable, porous oil pipes and other niggles. BUT it had real soul. Real soul to the point that a year after selling it I was on the lookout for another 308, preferably a GTB.

10 years later, in May this year I finally took the plunge and part exchanged the 328 against an early 308GTB that has had restoration work at least twice in its life, so is anything but original. It comes with over £100k of bills from top Ferrari specialists and therefore shouldn't need any major work for some years to come. However, it has only covered 5000 miles in the last 44 years (what a waste), having spent its time with owners who haven't really used it. So, as most of you would predict, I've been in a world of pain since buying it!

But, last month my ownership turned a corner. The Ferrari specialist I've used since buying that first 308 14 years ago has finally got the car running correctly.

OMG, what a car! Every journey is an event! The car is alive beneath you in a way the 328 simply wasn't (sorry, I know this is a 328 thread)! The throttle response, the induction roar, the go kart like handling, the exhaust rasp. Everything is like the 328 plus 20%. I love it so much, I've already had to increase the mileage on the insurance policy!

Last Sunday, on the spur of the moment, I drove to a car show, a 140 mile round trip with no issues other than aching cheeks from the permanent grin. Walked away with an award for best 70's car, which was unexpected (and frankly undeserved). I'm not sure I'd have made the effort in the 328, which is sad to admit.



However, the main point for this thread is that, whether you prefer 308s or 328s, they are both fantastic cars and seem to be so underrated, particularly in comparison with contemporary 911s. When you consider the relatively small numbers produced, the fact that the cars are rolling art, that they all drive so well and are fundamentally bulletproof, it seems as if we have all bought in to one of the sweet spots of the classic car world.
Never having owned a 328 although i have driven my mates one i can't really talk from experience but did buy a QV 308 GTS to replace my

308 GTB carburetter car ,luckily i still owned it when the QV arrived so could make a direct comparison between the two,

a little unfair as the GTB is modified and the GTS was standard but have owned standard GTB's previously so had some idea about the difference.

I hate to say it but the QV felt anaesthetised compared to the fizz i got out of the carburetter car , just feels more alive and as you say every drive

more of a event ,to be fair my car is running straight pipes and the factory air box has been replaced with pipercraft sponge air filters giving extra

induction noise , also the shorter gear lever gives more positive changes unlike the longer springer lever on the QV, the build quality was much improved

over the carburetter car as is the 328 i should imagine. Needless to say the QV didn't stay very long having sold it a few months later.

Looks like you have made the right decision ,some times you have to go backwards to go forwards yes


browngt3

1,363 posts

195 months

Sunday 23rd October
quotequote all
Very well put and nice write up too. As you say they are fantastic cars and indeed they are underrated.

I must admit to being disappointed the first time I drove one. Lured by its beauty and many years of lusting after one but used to driving more modern cars with considerably more capability, the 308 felt underwhelming. I suspect I'm not the only one who met a hero in this way only to be disappointed. However, the desire to own one persisted. There was still something there which needed to be explored. Not sure whether it was the lovely gated shift, the direct beautifully balanced steering or just it's overall charisma. The next drive was enough and I bought my 308 GTB QV.

Like any classic car they need to be driven. Not only does the car free up and improve but the driver starts to get it too. For me, compared to the Carrera 3.2 and Turbo Esprit the 308 is the clear winner. Its a usable Ferrari and deserves to be used. Possibly my favourite car ever!

rat rod

4,515 posts

49 months

Sunday 23rd October
quotequote all
browngt3 said:
Very well put and nice write up too. As you say they are fantastic cars and indeed they are underrated.

I must admit to being disappointed the first time I drove one. Lured by its beauty and many years of lusting after one but used to driving more modern cars with considerably more capability, the 308 felt underwhelming. I suspect I'm not the only one who met a hero in this way only to be disappointed. However, the desire to own one persisted. There was still something there which needed to be explored. Not sure whether it was the lovely gated shift, the direct beautifully balanced steering or just it's overall charisma. The next drive was enough and I bought my 308 GTB QV.

Like any classic car they need to be driven. Not only does the car free up and improve but the driver starts to get it too. For me, compared to the Carrera 3.2 and Turbo Esprit the 308 is the clear winner. Its a usable Ferrari and deserves to be used. Possibly my favourite car ever!
Had the same experience ,was put straight in the deep end having bought my first GTB on the foorsteps of the Dorchester in central London,

Test drive consisted of a slow crawl in Park Lane on a very hot summers day which didn't show the car at it's best then nursing it out of London in the

middle of the rush hour not a good first start but once clearing London traffic soon had a big grin on my face all the way home.

Think whether you go for a QV or a carburetter car depends how raw you like your cars and if you have never driven or owned a caburetter car

the QV is far from dull. Relpaced one of my Caterhams with a K series injected engine and that seemed dull compared to my BDA 45 webbered

seven . used to class the 308 GTB as the poor mans Dino but think that as unfair now ,it's a great car in it's own right.thumbup





Edited by rat rod on Sunday 23 October 11:23

Fessia fancier

781 posts

167 months

Saturday 29th October
quotequote all
theadman said:
Having last contributed to this thread in 2014, I thought an update might be in order...

After 11 years of ownership my 328GTS is off to pastures new.



I've had a great experience with the car. Bought it with 6000 miles on the clock, fresh out of 20 years of storage. This should have been a recipe for disaster, but it simply wasn't.

New clutch (manufacturing defect, not wear), brake hoses, a couple of coolant hoses, a cam belt service, a thorough check over and off she went.

The car received positive comments wherever I took her, which surprised me a bit, to be honest. There was none of the Ferrari hatred I was sort of expecting. Everyone was genuinely interested in the car's story and those in the know were amazed that the car was still wearing its original paint, had its original interior, and still looked factory fresh.

The joy of the car was that it was low mileage, but after some careful use it was driving like only a well used car can. It was the best of both worlds!

10,000 miles later, the car never let me down and provided plenty of smiles per mile without the need for excessive speed. I never took the plunge and took her to the Alps, which was an ambition, but other than that I feel I made the most of the experience.



This was "Drive It Day' in April...130 mile tour of the Cotswolds which showed the car at its best...reasonable progress along interesting A and B roads.

So, why on earth have I let such a gem go?

Well, before the 328 I had a carb 308GTS. How can two outwardly similar cars be so different to drive?

The 328 was brilliant...I had no doubt it would start every time, it was great in traffic with really effective cooling, it had a handbrake that actually held the car on a gradient; it really was a painless experience. The only niggle was occasional first gear selection issues when cold. It was utterly reliable. But in a sense, that was also its downfall. For me driving it was enjoyable, rather than being an EVENT.

The other thing is that values have rocketed since I bought the 328. Although prices have fallen back in recent years the car is still worth what to me is an eye watering amount of money. As a significant part of the value of my car lay in the fact it was all original, I became increasingly reticent to use it. Surely, this defeats the whole object of having a Ferrari?

The earlier 308GTS was a bit of a pain to start with. I had lots of frustrating issues to deal with...coolant leaks, air locks in the cooling system that left me stranded on the M40, a broken throttle cable, porous oil pipes and other niggles. BUT it had real soul. Real soul to the point that a year after selling it I was on the lookout for another 308, preferably a GTB.

10 years later, in May this year I finally took the plunge and part exchanged the 328 against an early 308GTB that has had restoration work at least twice in its life, so is anything but original. It comes with over £100k of bills from top Ferrari specialists and therefore shouldn't need any major work for some years to come. However, it has only covered 5000 miles in the last 44 years (what a waste), having spent its time with owners who haven't really used it. So, as most of you would predict, I've been in a world of pain since buying it!

But, last month my ownership turned a corner. The Ferrari specialist I've used since buying that first 308 14 years ago has finally got the car running correctly.

OMG, what a car! Every journey is an event! The car is alive beneath you in a way the 328 simply wasn't (sorry, I know this is a 328 thread)! The throttle response, the induction roar, the go kart like handling, the exhaust rasp. Everything is like the 328 plus 20%. I love it so much, I've already had to increase the mileage on the insurance policy!

Last Sunday, on the spur of the moment, I drove to a car show, a 140 mile round trip with no issues other than aching cheeks from the permanent grin. Walked away with an award for best 70's car, which was unexpected (and frankly undeserved). I'm not sure I'd have made the effort in the 328, which is sad to admit.



However, the main point for this thread is that, whether you prefer 308s or 328s, they are both fantastic cars and seem to be so underrated, particularly in comparison with contemporary 911s. When you consider the relatively small numbers produced, the fact that the cars are rolling art, that they all drive so well and are fundamentally bulletproof, it seems as if we have all bought in to one of the sweet spots of the classic car world.
That is a good write-up. I sold my 328 GTS (non-ABS like your old car) last year after 22 years. It really was excellent, reliable, tough and fantastic looking. Mine was black, which made the roof blend in well to my eyes.
I still have my carb 308 GTB. They really are fantastic cars and it is difficult in my mind to think of something better at that kind of price - the shape is still a thing of beauty, they are quite easy to drive and to run, and yet very rewarding.

philwild

8 posts

1 month

Saturday 12th November
quotequote all
Hey everyone!
I'm very new in here. Please go easy on me =)

The Ferrari 328 GTS is a car I've always wanted to own. Actually, not entirely true as I initially fell in love with the 308 when watching Magnum PI as a kid. Now in my 50s, I've spent my entire life mostly driving sensible, family-oriented cars. The kids are driving and have their own cars so my driving now is mostly for me. I feel that if ever I'm going to buy a Ferrari, it has to be now or never...

I've chosen the 328 over the 308 from a maintenance perspective. I also prefer the look of the interior, yet externally it still has that classic 308 Ferrari look.
I've been browsing PistonHeads & CarandClassic. Is there anywhere else I should look/monitor?

If I wanted independent advice on a vehicle before buying, who would people recommend I use?

All the advertised cars seem to be dealer ads. Is this the norm? Am I correct in assuming most of these cars are being sold on consignment through the dealers?

I'm open to all advice!

Cheers
Phil

johnnyreggae

2,760 posts

144 months

Saturday 12th November
quotequote all
There's not many who will travel to inspect - maybe Tim @ Walkersport & Mark @ Morethapolish - so to some extent it will depend on finding a good indie near a car in which you are interested to do the inspection - then one local to you for maintenance

One way and another there's a huge amount of UK Ferrari buying experience on PH & on the net generally over the years - spend some time looking for it & reading it - a bit of us-oriented background https://www.ferrarichat.com/forum/threads/what-to-...

Edited by johnnyreggae on Saturday 12th November 10:12

67Dino

3,274 posts

89 months

Saturday 12th November
quotequote all
philwild said:
Hey everyone!
I'm very new in here. Please go easy on me =)

The Ferrari 328 GTS is a car I've always wanted to own. Actually, not entirely true as I initially fell in love with the 308 when watching Magnum PI as a kid. Now in my 50s, I've spent my entire life mostly driving sensible, family-oriented cars. The kids are driving and have their own cars so my driving now is mostly for me. I feel that if ever I'm going to buy a Ferrari, it has to be now or never...

I've chosen the 328 over the 308 from a maintenance perspective. I also prefer the look of the interior, yet externally it still has that classic 308 Ferrari look.
I've been browsing PistonHeads & CarandClassic. Is there anywhere else I should look/monitor?

If I wanted independent advice on a vehicle before buying, who would people recommend I use?

All the advertised cars seem to be dealer ads. Is this the norm? Am I correct in assuming most of these cars are being sold on consignment through the dealers?

I'm open to all advice!

Cheers
Phil
Good for you! My advice would always be to spend the most you can afford and and get the best maintained. Otherwise you’ll end up spending the difference on maintenance and have a load of hassle. Nick Cartwright is one of the leading dealers and can be 100% trusted that anything he sells is top notch. Not the cheapest though.

philwild

8 posts

1 month

Saturday 12th November
quotequote all
johnnyreggae said:
One way and another there's a huge amount of UK Ferrari buying experience on PH & on the net generally over the years - spend some time looking for it & reading it - a bit of us-oriented background https://www.ferrarichat.com/forum/threads/what-to-...

Edited by johnnyreggae on Saturday 12th November 10:12
Thanks for the link to that forum page. I'll have a read.

rat rod

4,515 posts

49 months

Saturday 12th November
quotequote all
philwild said:
Hey everyone!
I'm very new in here. Please go easy on me =)

The Ferrari 328 GTS is a car I've always wanted to own. Actually, not entirely true as I initially fell in love with the 308 when watching Magnum PI as a kid. Now in my 50s, I've spent my entire life mostly driving sensible, family-oriented cars. The kids are driving and have their own cars so my driving now is mostly for me. I feel that if ever I'm going to buy a Ferrari, it has to be now or never...

I've chosen the 328 over the 308 from a maintenance perspective. I also prefer the look of the interior, yet externally it still has that classic 308 Ferrari look.
I've been browsing PistonHeads & CarandClassic. Is there anywhere else I should look/monitor?

If I wanted independent advice on a vehicle before buying, who would people recommend I use?

All the advertised cars seem to be dealer ads. Is this the norm? Am I correct in assuming most of these cars are being sold on consignment through the dealers?

I'm open to all advice!

Cheers
Phil
Second that for Nick Cartwright,he's one of the good guys,most of the specialists who are still around are enthusiasts

as well as running a business and would give some sort of warranty if buying from them,if buying privately as already been said

the nearest to the seller as most owners wouldn't want to travel far.I wouldn't take a older car to a main dealer as they could condemn

a perfectly good car where a specialist would take in account the age and maybe price asked.,QV,KHP,Foskers,Rardleys,Shiltech would be good places

for inspections or buying just keep away from any that has a connection with a certain V---i , good luck with your search thumbup


Edited by rat rod on Saturday 12th November 18:39

Jex

767 posts

112 months

Monday 14th November
quotequote all
philwild said:
Hey everyone!
I'm very new in here. Please go easy on me =)

The Ferrari 328 GTS is a car I've always wanted to own. Actually, not entirely true as I initially fell in love with the 308 when watching Magnum PI as a kid. Now in my 50s, I've spent my entire life mostly driving sensible, family-oriented cars. The kids are driving and have their own cars so my driving now is mostly for me. I feel that if ever I'm going to buy a Ferrari, it has to be now or never...

I've chosen the 328 over the 308 from a maintenance perspective. I also prefer the look of the interior, yet externally it still has that classic 308 Ferrari look.
I've been browsing PistonHeads & CarandClassic. Is there anywhere else I should look/monitor?

If I wanted independent advice on a vehicle before buying, who would people recommend I use?

All the advertised cars seem to be dealer ads. Is this the norm? Am I correct in assuming most of these cars are being sold on consignment through the dealers?

I'm open to all advice!

Cheers
Phil
Roger Collingwood at Kent High Performance Cars (Formerly The Ferrari Centre), in Maidstone is very knowledgable have found him very helpful with my cars. Also, Mike Wheeler at Rardley in Surrey is very knowledgable about cars and their history.

Where in the country are you and what specifically are you looking for?

philwild

8 posts

1 month

Wednesday 16th November
quotequote all
Jex said:
Roger Collingwood at Kent High Performance Cars (Formerly The Ferrari Centre), in Maidstone is very knowledgable have found him very helpful with my cars. Also, Mike Wheeler at Rardley in Surrey is very knowledgable about cars and their history.

Where in the country are you and what specifically are you looking for?
I'm happy to travel to wherever a car is located to buy it.
When I looked about a year ago, I would have said the best car I could buy with 70K. That's no longer enough... Most cars have moved to be out of my price range but I haven't acctually put physical eyes on any car yet.

328GTS RHD any vintage in as best condition as I can find within my price range.

I'm not in the UK. There are none of these cars where I live (that I know of). My plan is to travel to the UK in December or January and after shortlisting a few, buy the one that's most suitable. I want to have a driving holiday through the UK at that time, before having it appropriately packed for a trip home.

doggydog33

238 posts

237 months

Wednesday 16th November
quotequote all
philwild said:
Hey everyone!
I'm very new in here. Please go easy on me =)

The Ferrari 328 GTS is a car I've always wanted to own. Actually, not entirely true as I initially fell in love with the 308 when watching Magnum PI as a kid. Now in my 50s, I've spent my entire life mostly driving sensible, family-oriented cars. The kids are driving and have their own cars so my driving now is mostly for me. I feel that if ever I'm going to buy a Ferrari, it has to be now or never...

I've chosen the 328 over the 308 from a maintenance perspective. I also prefer the look of the interior, yet externally it still has that classic 308 Ferrari look.
I've been browsing PistonHeads & CarandClassic. Is there anywhere else I should look/monitor?

If I wanted independent advice on a vehicle before buying, who would people recommend I use?

All the advertised cars seem to be dealer ads. Is this the norm? Am I correct in assuming most of these cars are being sold on consignment through the dealers?

I'm open to all advice!

Cheers
Phil
Keys Motorsport at Silverstone inspected a 355 for me. They traveled down to near Brighton to inspect it. It was a couple of years ago but I would think they still offer the service.

Regards, Doggydog33

philwild

8 posts

1 month

Wednesday 16th November
quotequote all
doggydog33 said:
Keys Motorsport at Silverstone inspected a 355 for me. They traveled down to near Brighton to inspect it. It was a couple of years ago but I would think they still offer the service.

Regards, Doggydog33
Thanks!

sparta6

3,321 posts

84 months

Wednesday 16th November
quotequote all
philwild said:
Hey everyone!
I'm very new in here. Please go easy on me =)

The Ferrari 328 GTS is a car I've always wanted to own. Actually, not entirely true as I initially fell in love with the 308 when watching Magnum PI as a kid. Now in my 50s, I've spent my entire life mostly driving sensible, family-oriented cars. The kids are driving and have their own cars so my driving now is mostly for me. I feel that if ever I'm going to buy a Ferrari, it has to be now or never...

I've chosen the 328 over the 308 from a maintenance perspective. I also prefer the look of the interior, yet externally it still has that classic 308 Ferrari look.
I've been browsing PistonHeads & CarandClassic. Is there anywhere else I should look/monitor?

If I wanted independent advice on a vehicle before buying, who would people recommend I use?

All the advertised cars seem to be dealer ads. Is this the norm? Am I correct in assuming most of these cars are being sold on consignment through the dealers?

I'm open to all advice!

Cheers
Phil
Congrats on making a clear decision !

The 328 is a fine choice, I had a GTB as a daily and it never missed a beat.

Very few have issues, one of them belonging to the father of a well known racing driver. That aside they are a sweet spot for Ferrari design and robust straightforward engineering.

Having said that I kept the 308 for sunny days biggrin

Enjoy your search and enjoy those miles !

67Dino

3,274 posts

89 months

Wednesday 16th November
quotequote all
Just seen that Simon Furlonger has a couple of GTBs in at the moment - one without ABS at 26k miles and one with at 41k. I bought a 355 from him some years back and it was fabulous.

Jex

767 posts

112 months

Thursday 17th November
quotequote all
philwild said:
Jex said:
Roger Collingwood at Kent High Performance Cars (Formerly The Ferrari Centre), in Maidstone is very knowledgable have found him very helpful with my cars. Also, Mike Wheeler at Rardley in Surrey is very knowledgable about cars and their history.

Where in the country are you and what specifically are you looking for?
I'm happy to travel to wherever a car is located to buy it.
When I looked about a year ago, I would have said the best car I could buy with 70K. That's no longer enough... Most cars have moved to be out of my price range but I haven't acctually put physical eyes on any car yet.

328GTS RHD any vintage in as best condition as I can find within my price range.

I'm not in the UK. There are none of these cars where I live (that I know of). My plan is to travel to the UK in December or January and after shortlisting a few, buy the one that's most suitable. I want to have a driving holiday through the UK at that time, before having it appropriately packed for a trip home.
I have a Rosso Corsa with Magnolia leather 328 GTS that I was thinking of selling next year. Just under 37,000 miles at the moment. 1988 ABS model, with a body coloured targa. Contact me if you would like to know more.

Fiammetta

345 posts

72 months

Thursday 24th November
quotequote all
The 3#8 series Ferrari is probably the most reliable and very DIY friendly modal going Fwds .
Carb modals are even better .Technically no fuel injection woes .Counterintuitively the old the better as simpler .
Having said that the late modals 328 sits at the top of the performance tree and i guess easiest to drive , nearest to modern creature comfort’s ie climate control ABS , zinc coated bodies etc etc .
As others have said access to the transverse engine is through a 5 min removal of the wheel arch liners .Cam belts , alternator, water pump on the RHS ,clutch LHS .
The suspension is robust easy to DIY a total poly bush ( last indefinitely) .I had a 360 back in its day with FFSH and for 7 yrs in my ownership they F dealers , always found some bush , tie rod or other to replace in the suspension .Talking 1.5-2K miles pa .
Had a Testarossa too , physically too wide for every day use , ie Sunday mornings nip to your local shops for convenience stuff .Also TR was a poor at handling , too much rearward mass and poor brakes .
3 series F cars are the handling sweet spot , the maintenance sweet spot and parking / daily life usage sweet spot .
I had currently got after going through a Testarossa for 10 y , 360 F 1 ( hated the F1 btw ) 7 yrs a imported 208GT4 .Personally I like the Bertone wedge thingy .It’s come to me .
With the rear +2 seats like a 911 adds a bit more day to day practicality.
Pre 40 yrs so a up to 82/83 308 for you in particular means zero road tax as well .

Thus far never lost £ on any F car .Sold tge Testarossa for £25K and the 360 £20 K for more than I bought them .That basically funded the maintenance = so free motoring .

To give you an idea the 208 GT 4 stands me £32K bought at a Historics auction 2018 .
The Bertone 3#8 series are currently undergoing a price revival at the mo.A silver U.K. car went for just shy of £70K at the recent NEC classic car show Silverstone auction .
mine gotta be N of £40 maybe a number starting with a 5 .
But who cares it’s a keeper because it’s the best , most pleasurable to drive of the three I have had .Just nice that you know you buck the used car depreciation trend while inflation cash in the bank is currently sinking @ circa 10% .