My Taimar

My Taimar

Author
Discussion

plasticpig72

1,637 posts

113 months

Friday 15th January
quotequote all
I had a yellow 1975 1600M that had been rewired using White Wires everywhere amazing.
I was lead to understand it had been rewired by a Woman who did F1 wiring.
Alan

timelord

297 posts

247 months

Friday 15th January
quotequote all
Of course! Everyone knows white wires are lighter than black ones

Penelope Stopit

8,168 posts

73 months

Friday 15th January
quotequote all
plasticpig72 said:
I had a yellow 1975 1600M that had been rewired using White Wires everywhere amazing.
I was lead to understand it had been rewired by a Woman who did F1 wiring.
Alan
Wonder why she didn't use clear sleeving, you would have been able to see the electric moving around the circuits

plasticpig1972

116 posts

10 months

Friday 15th January
quotequote all
I always knew you are a bit of a bright spark/live wire Penelopelaugh
Alan

Penelope Stopit

8,168 posts

73 months

Friday 15th January
quotequote all
plasticpig1972 said:
I always knew you are a bit of a bright spark/live wire Penelopelaugh
Alan
Couldn't resistor posting that

Stay safe

calum62

Original Poster:

77 posts

6 months

Friday 15th January
quotequote all
Penelope Stopit said:
Black looms are amazing
The word "loom" may be giving it more credit than it deserves, there is no wrap or conduit on the wiring it's a bunch of wires tie wrapped to the chassis! What could possibly go wrong idea

calum62

Original Poster:

77 posts

6 months

Friday 15th January
quotequote all
Slow M said:
It may be of interest to you to look at the three concurrent restorations being chronicled here,
https://grassrootsmotorsports.com/forum/build-proj...
here,
https://grassrootsmotorsports.com/forum/build-proj...
and here.
https://grassrootsmotorsports.com/forum/build-proj...
Cheers for that bounce

Penelope Stopit

8,168 posts

73 months

Friday 15th January
quotequote all
calum62 said:
Penelope Stopit said:
Black looms are amazing
The word "loom" may be giving it more credit than it deserves, there is no wrap or conduit on the wiring it's a bunch of wires tie wrapped to the chassis! What could possibly go wrong idea
Do wonder how many of the older cars kept running ok, not only TVRs

Owe you an apology

Before visiting back here, had been looking through old emails that I thought had been deleted, the total price for the Escort MKII cable was 64 Pounds and 50 Pence

calum62

Original Poster:

77 posts

6 months

Friday 15th January
quotequote all
Cheers, building up quite a list of stuff that will need replacing besides wiring, the brake servo is RTF as well frown

Penelope Stopit

8,168 posts

73 months

Friday 15th January
quotequote all
Ok then, keep enjoying

calum62

Original Poster:

77 posts

6 months

Saturday 16th January
quotequote all
All preparations now complete to lift body off. Should get that done in the next few days hopefully. Ended up cutting off all the body bolts with angle grinder as would have taken many hours to undo them. Getting replaced anyways

While under the car been having a good look at the chassis & and I am not so happy about the condition of the chassis from the rear wheels back. Particular the chassis tubes visible in the rear wheel arches. Somewhat concerning but the only way to know what I'm dealing for sure with is to strip it down completely.

Maybe worrying about the worst case but out of interest what options have you if the chassis is in need of major work? Are new ones available or are there TVR Specialist companies that will refurbish your existing one ? Replacing a few tubes isn't an issue for me, but if I find a large section where all tubes are toast it would be.. Maintaining the correct geometry when repairing would be difficult.

Cheers
Rob

GAjon

3,319 posts

177 months

Saturday 16th January
quotequote all
Over the diff is a big corrosion area, all the water spray, heat from the exhaust boxes and TVR in their wisdom fitted a sound deadening mat over the diff to absorb and hold the water and ste!

The trouble here is a lot of the suspension pick up points are on these tubes so it’s quite a fabrication job to do it correctly if there is severe corrosion.
It’s not impossible to do if your confident and methodical.

Before you cut out anything, check how true your chassis is.
If your happy with it, do one side at a time using the other as reference and datum.
There are people who do replacement chassis Duncan Ruben I think.
Don’t know price or availability.

calum62

Original Poster:

77 posts

6 months

Sunday 17th January
quotequote all
Cheers for the advice. I plan on ordering up extra metal tube/box to practice with (fitting up and welding) prior to going near the chassis in anger. Although I've done my fair share of hobby welding in the past I want any work done to be beyond reproach. Some pretty funky angles in that chassis, must have taken an age to build originally.

Strangely the front part of the body is shimmed off the chassis by rubber sheet of varying thickness. At the back it looks like they used old sacking! I think at some time someone has done a bit of renovation on the chassis cos I also found a lap welded patch on one of the chassis tubes. Not unexpected given the age.


DavidY

4,304 posts

248 months

Sunday 17th January
quotequote all
calum62 said:
Cheers for the advice. I plan on ordering up extra metal tube/box to practice with (fitting up and welding) prior to going near the chassis in anger. Although I've done my fair share of hobby welding in the past I want any work done to be beyond reproach. Some pretty funky angles in that chassis, must have taken an age to build originally.

Strangely the front part of the body is shimmed off the chassis by rubber sheet of varying thickness. At the back it looks like they used old sacking! I think at some time someone has done a bit of renovation on the chassis cos I also found a lap welded patch on one of the chassis tubes. Not unexpected given the age.
The bodies varied as the moulds aged, so its not uncommon to have different amounts of packing at each body contact point, to 'level' the body

plasticpig72

1,637 posts

113 months

Sunday 17th January
quotequote all
Same as on Lotus Elans Shim to stop stress.
For thick Shims you can use chopping blocks from the Kitchen. If you buy new ones for swmbo.
Alan

calum62

Original Poster:

77 posts

6 months

Sunday 17th January
quotequote all
I was considering using rubber patches from car tyres. Doubling or trebling it up as required. That should see me out!

Moto

1,036 posts

217 months

Monday 18th January
quotequote all
I was thinking of using ice hockey pucks between chassis and body. I've being using a couple for some 10 years on my trolly jack arm when lifting the chassis and they've been great at spreading loading, never degraded (so far) and are very dense rubber/foam. I was planning to remove rubber to form a groove on the one side for the tube to sit in. This would spread the load over a greater surface area and the groove can be cut to leave the required depth of rubber to get the correct level at each point.

They're also cheap - you can pick them up for a couple of £ each.

Moto

DavidY

4,304 posts

248 months

Monday 18th January
quotequote all
Moto said:
I was thinking of using ice hockey pucks between chassis and body. I've being using a couple for some 10 years on my trolly jack arm when lifting the chassis and they've been great at spreading loading, never degraded (so far) and are very dense rubber/foam. I was planning to remove rubber to form a groove on the one side for the tube to sit in. This would spread the load over a greater surface area and the groove can be cut to leave the required depth of rubber to get the correct level at each point.

They're also cheap - you can pick them up for a couple of £ each.

Moto
If the rubber they are made of resistant to oil and grease??

Moto

1,036 posts

217 months

Monday 18th January
quotequote all
Good question. And the answer is I don't know.

Google says they're made of a vulcanised natural rubber / butyl rubber / high styrene / plasticiser mix. Unsurprisingly I can't find any data on oil resistance. Although they are apparently "extremely durable", "able to withstand up to 30 ton of pressure" and " -40 to +40 degrees C".

Being able to withstand all the different oils & chemicals in a car including screen wash, anti-freeze, engine oil, transmission oil, grease, together with road salts, bitumen etc etc is a good point.

I think I'll stick one in a container with a selection of fluids and see what effect they have between now and October when my chassis refurb is planned.

Moto

V6 Pushfit

16,181 posts

74 months

Monday 18th January
quotequote all
DavidY said:
Moto said:
I was thinking of using ice hockey pucks between chassis and body. I've being using a couple for some 10 years on my trolly jack arm when lifting the chassis and they've been great at spreading loading, never degraded (so far) and are very dense rubber/foam. I was planning to remove rubber to form a groove on the one side for the tube to sit in. This would spread the load over a greater surface area and the groove can be cut to leave the required depth of rubber to get the correct level at each point.

They're also cheap - you can pick them up for a couple of £ each.

Moto
If the rubber they are made of resistant to oil and grease??
Brilliant idea they have all sorts of uses I just checked them out on eBay no wonder sellers have sold then in the hundreds in a country that hardly plays ice hockey!!