Can adhesive be used for coping stones on wall?

Can adhesive be used for coping stones on wall?

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Discussion

xyz123

Original Poster:

834 posts

93 months

Monday 1st March
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Hi, asking on behalf of a friend.

He has a empty house going up for sale on Friday. House has been empty since January and when he visited today found that few coping stones on brick wall in front garden had fallen off. Maybe from bad weather but not sure.

In interest of trying to fix it before Friday , can a grab adhesives be used instead of cement? Not really feasible to get someone to come and fix it by Thursday so thinking of a short term bodge.

Thanks
J

Andy 308GTB

2,350 posts

185 months

Monday 1st March
quotequote all
xyz123 said:
Hi, asking on behalf of a friend.

He has a empty house going up for sale on Friday. House has been empty since January and when he visited today found that few coping stones on brick wall in front garden had fallen off. Maybe from bad weather but not sure.

In interest of trying to fix it before Friday , can a grab adhesives be used instead of cement? Not really feasible to get someone to come and fix it by Thursday so thinking of a short term bodge.

Thanks
J
I used grab adhesive to secure bits of my yorkstone fireplace together a few years ago without a problem. I'm sure it will be OK.

PrinceRupert

10,187 posts

49 months

Monday 1st March
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My builder suggested a cheap fix for our coping stones that are falling off (super sandy cement mix) would be some chemfix.

Mr MXT

7,425 posts

247 months

Monday 1st March
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I used CT1 for similar, no issues.

ARHarh

1,138 posts

71 months

Monday 1st March
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Surely it would just be far easier to pop out buy a bag of cement and a bag of sand, do some mixing and fix it properly. You really don't need many skills to mix and spread cement. You have to go and buy the adhesive which might work anyway.

Black_S3

2,432 posts

152 months

Monday 1st March
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There’s loads of options from mortar in silicone type tubes to all the ucan mix in the tub type things that are outside in the building section at b and q.

Evoluzione

5,717 posts

207 months

Monday 1st March
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There is a good adhesive for masonry, its called cement. You mix it with sand and water and it doesn't cost much.
It has excellent weather resistance and gap filling properties.

r44flyer

282 posts

180 months

Tuesday 2nd March
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Tube of stickslikest from screwfix. £7-8. It did ours and they've been stuck solid for ages.

ARHarh

1,138 posts

71 months

Tuesday 2nd March
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r44flyer said:
Tube of stickslikest from screwfix. £7-8. It did ours and they've been stuck solid for ages.
cement and sand will be half that price. And it's almost like it was designed for this sort of job.

rockin

9,560 posts

209 months

Tuesday 2nd March
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xyz123 said:
can a grab adhesives be used instead of cement? Not really feasible to get someone to come and fix it by Thursday so thinking of a short term bodge.
Yes, that's exactly the way I fix my brick gate posts when people crash into them.

A cartridge of Gripfill can be yours for just £2.49 at Screwfix. Colour is somewhere between brown and grey so ideal for the job.
https://www.screwfix.com/p/gripfill-adhesive-350ml...


r44flyer

282 posts

180 months

Tuesday 2nd March
quotequote all
ARHarh said:
cement and sand will be half that price. And it's almost like it was designed for this sort of job.
Just don't know why you would bother faffing about mixing up mortar for a job like that, to save literally a few quid. Snip the end off a tube of stickslikest turbo, few blobs and drop the stone on and you're done. Weatherproof and you can apply it to wet surfaces, sets solid in 15mins and the bond is stronger than mortar.

timberman

717 posts

179 months

Tuesday 2nd March
quotequote all
r44flyer said:
ARHarh said:
cement and sand will be half that price. And it's almost like it was designed for this sort of job.
Just don't know why you would bother faffing about mixing up mortar for a job like that, to save literally a few quid. Snip the end off a tube of stickslikest turbo, few blobs and drop the stone on and you're done. Weatherproof and you can apply it to wet surfaces, sets solid in 15mins and the bond is stronger than mortar.
It's hardly a faff,
I can mix up a small batch of mortar in a couple of minutes plus it has a longer working time than anything like no nails so better for positioning the coping stone correctly,
If you really want to reduce the effort required just get a tub of ready mix from Screwfix for a few quid and you just need to add water.

the only thing I would say is that if the coping stone has come loose then its more than likely got dried mortar stuck to it which will need removing 1st, but even that should be just a few minutes work with a hammer and bolster.

It's not a job that should require a professional,
just need a few basic tools and some common sense

Black_S3

2,432 posts

152 months

Tuesday 2nd March
quotequote all
timberman said:
If you really want to reduce the effort required just get a tub of ready mix from Screwfix for a few quid and you just need to add water.
Yup, even could be even lazier if not fussed about cost.

Never used it but if I was set on trying something out a tube it would be this before even ct1

https://www.screwfix.com/p/no-nonsense-mortar-repa...


paulrockliffe

12,103 posts

191 months

Tuesday 2nd March
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The only reason to use mortar is that you would normally a pointed gap to match the brick pointing between the last brick and the coping stone.

Sand and cement wasn't invented for this, it was all there was before the relatively recent invention of proper chemical adhesives. Sand and Cement isn't really that good, if it was the OP's coping stones wouldn't have come loose. Proper adhesive will bond better and for longer, but it won't look quite right. For a quick fix, adhesive every time.

Black_S3

2,432 posts

152 months

Tuesday 2nd March
quotequote all
^Even damp/with outdoor type stuff on the surfaces? You likely know more than I do Paul but I can see it hitting problems with a lot of gripfil/ct1 type things?

Pistonsquirter

100 posts

3 months

Wednesday 3rd March
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I just bought a Victorian fireplace from a guy that told me to use adhesive to stick it to the masonry, do not use adhesive to stick things to masonry.

sutoka

3,377 posts

72 months

Thursday 4th March
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I've used the Pinkgrip stuff on a coping and it hasn't come loose or fallen off.

I remember Dick Strawbridge on Escape to the Chateau using old spanners and epoxy resin to repair the coping on his balustrade he was quoted several thousand euro I think he did it himself for less than 50 euro.

Evolved

2,661 posts

151 months

Thursday 4th March
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Well I don’t expect these replies, thought the OP would have been ripped to shreds for suggesting such a bodge.

Never heard of anyone siliconing their walls together! Personally, I’d do the job properly and remove to re-mortar. You can buy tubs of premix at Screwfix that you just add water too, trowel it on and press down to set, then you can point up. You’ll need mortar anyway to point, unless you’re planning on using silicon there as well.

thebraketester

10,971 posts

102 months

Thursday 4th March
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I stuck a brick back on a step about 5 years ago and it’s not moved despite constant use.

I used gorilla glue.

Elatino1

1,125 posts

25 months

Thursday 4th March
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Just use mortar, you will need some to point in the bed underneath anyway