RE: Lamborghini Murcielago: PH Buying Guide

RE: Lamborghini Murcielago: PH Buying Guide

Monday 5th December 2016

Lamborghini Murcielago: PH Buying Guide

Arguably the last of the big, bad Lambos is now from £100K - here's how to buy a good one



There was a great deal of hype surrounding the launch of the Lamborghini Murcielago in 2002. Understandable really, as this was the Italian firm's first supercar built entirely under Audi's ownership. And replacing the Diablo was never going to be easy, was it?

Ah, Italy
Ah, Italy
Neither was its path to production straightforward. Volkswagen boss at the time Ferdinand Piech disliked Lamborghini's original design. So it was scrapped, and Luc Donckerwolke from Audi was charged with penning the Diablo's replacement.

The result has all of the attitude and aggression that Lamborghini is famous for. Yet the Murcielago was more practical than its predecessor, if you could ever say that of a car with scissor doors, helped by the optional E-gear automated manual. Much of its greater usability was down to the 6.2-litre V12, an evolution of the Diablo's Colombo 6.0-litre V12, while all-wheel drive was standard on every model.

For the Murcielago, the engine received new electronic management, drive-by-wire throttle, dry sump lubrication and a bigger, broader spread of torque. With 479lb ft on offer at 5,400rpm, and 400lb ft at just 2,000rpm, the big Lamborghini is amazingly docile in traffic. If it does get a little hot under the collar, the party piece air intakes above the rear wings rise up to help cool the V12.

Manual Roadster must be a rare one!
Manual Roadster must be a rare one!
Even with this more accommodating nature, 0-62mph was dealt with in 3.6 seconds and it was a genuine 205mph car. Using the power was made easier than in the Diablo as the Murcielago's engine sat some 50mm lower in the chassis, making the handling more predictable even though it was capable of higher speeds through corners. Still, the Murcielago can catch out the unwary, and 1,650kg takes a lot of stopping...

Development of the Murcielago took in the Roadster in 2004, which has a fabric roof that's fiddly and time-consuming to remove or erect. Lamborghini made no bones about the fact this model was aimed at customers in warm climates, where the roof was more an emergency umbrella.

The next evolutionary step was the replacement 6.5-litre V12 that heralded the arrival of the Murcielago LP640-4 in 2006. More power meant 0-62mph in 3.4 seconds, with top speed increased to 211mph. Naturally, a Roadster model followed, and there was a limited edition LP650-4 Roadster finished in Grigio Telesto grey paint with Arancio (orange) highlights, plus grey and orange interior trim. Only 50 of these were built.

Mad, bad SV arrived in 2009
Mad, bad SV arrived in 2009
The pinnacle of the Murcielago range was the LP670-4 Super Veloce, or SV for short. Only 350 of this lightened, faster Murcielago were made, with all but a select few fitted with the E-gear transmission. Carbon fibre is used extensively throughout the SV to drop its kerb weight by 100kg compared to the LP640 Coupe, with its kerbweight rated at 1,565kg. The end result is 0-62mph in 3.2 seconds and a 212mph top speed.

The SV retained four-wheel drive to cope with its power and it was the finest handling iteration of the Murcielago, even if it had become too extreme for easy daily use. As such, it took Lamborghini right back to where it arguably belongs, as the wild child of supercar makers.

Today, an SV will set you back from £325,000 and prices are on the rise as collectors move in on this version. At the other end of the scale, an early 6.2-litre car can be had from £100,000, while the later LP-640 begins at £120,000.


PHer's view:
"The Murcielago is quite old fashioned compared to the current crop of supercars, but that's its charm. It's a big old bull of a thing and that's what I love."
James Peters


Buying Guide contents:
Introduction
Powertrain
Rolling chassis
Body
Interior
At a glance

Search for Lamborghini Murcielagos in the PH classifieds

 


Author
Discussion

jayemm89

Original Poster:

2,157 posts

66 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
Awesome car that still has tons of presence, there's a guy in my town with one - you can hear it from a fair distance when he opens the taps. Nothing sounds like a Lambo V12 at full chat. Glorious.

Just a shame that interior is as ludicrously bland as you'd expect something German circa 2002 to be. Bit of colour helps, still a bit of a letdown though.

Gandahar

5,996 posts

64 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
These are when the company just produced something gobstopping, without too many angles and styling that has got too far over the top.

If you see one trundling by you see something impossibly low and impossible wide and although doing 38mph you could imagine it doing 200mph.

It's a bit of a beast from the old days, a dinosaur. That's a compliment. I'd love to own one, man v machine. I do think the machine might be offering out the spanking in this case though. Which is as it should be.

Cracking car, and not gone mad on prices like other trinkets of the month .....


P5BNij

2,433 posts

42 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
Always admired them, just the right mix of brutishness and subtle beauty... I love the rear end view...


soad

29,210 posts

112 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
P5BNij said:
Always admired them, just the right mix of brutishness and subtle beauty... I love the rear end view...

yes Later exhaust doesn't look as meaty either.

ambuletz

7,269 posts

117 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
buyers guide for a lambo? I think I'll wait until it hits shed money before I consider it.
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Atmospheric

5,208 posts

144 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
Baffled why 0-60 is still being trotted out in a car like this. 0-124mph please.

Come on PH. Other than that, I love the pic of the interior with the correct gearbox.

Alpinestars

10,914 posts

180 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
Wonderful cars. Especially in manual guise.

red_slr

7,559 posts

125 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
Pretty sure we have our own resident expert on the V12 who might disagree the engine is bullet proof - but tbf his did a lot of track work so probably horses for courses although the top end rebuilds were eye watering cost wise.

Veeayt

2,729 posts

141 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
There's no such colour as Arancio Orange, that simply means orange orange. There's a lot of shades of Lambo orange, such as Arancio Borealis, Arancio Argos etc and even a simple Arancio.

Lordbenny

7,081 posts

155 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
What percentage of PH'ers can even contemplate buying a second hand Murcielago I wonder?

babatunde

736 posts

126 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
Lordbenny said:
What percentage of PH'ers can even contemplate buying a second hand Murcielago I wonder?
90% of us powerfully built, redbull drinking company directors

soad

29,210 posts

112 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
Lordbenny said:
What percentage of PH'ers can even contemplate buying a second hand Murcielago I wonder?
You'd be surprised, chap. Not me though. I remain a poor wage slave.

P5BNij

2,433 posts

42 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
Lordbenny said:
What percentage of PH'ers can even contemplate buying a second hand Murcielago I wonder?
I could easily contemplate it all day long, reality may have other plans for me, but it doesn't stop the daydreaming!

Gerber1

116 posts

28 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
I am amazed a 14 year old example costs so much, always liked them though.

mikEsprit

705 posts

122 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
jayemm89 said:
Awesome car that still has tons of presence, there's a guy in my town with one - you can hear it from a fair distance when he opens the taps. Nothing sounds like a Lambo V12 at full chat. Glorious.

Just a shame that interior is as ludicrously bland as you'd expect something German circa 2002 to be. Bit of colour helps, still a bit of a letdown though.
Haha, I went the other direction when I saw the interior. My first thoughts were similar, but all complimentary--surprisingly restrained, elegant, classy.

Alpinestars

10,914 posts

180 months

Sunday 4th December 2016
quotequote all
Gerber1 said:
I am amazed a 14 year old example costs so much, always liked them though.
Why? Plenty of older cars go for huge money.

sandysinclair

160 posts

143 months

Monday 5th December 2016
quotequote all
Got to chip in here I love everything about the car. The engine is a sledgehammer and it utterly punishes the cocky driver. Challenging, rewarding and makes you go deaf and a terrifying prospect in the wrong hands, cold or wet roads.... In an era of flappy paddle luxury it's nice to be made to work really hard and be smooth for your driving rewards. Bewitching gated manual V12 theatre.

alexb1

8 posts

93 months

Monday 5th December 2016
quotequote all
Seemingly only 186 examples of the SV ever made it to production so it does indeed seem like there is some "investor potential" in there if that's the case

SirSquidalot

3,047 posts

101 months

Monday 5th December 2016
quotequote all
I drove one just 3 weeks after passing my test on an experience day. Wow! A car that will always be in my heart, it's simply stunning.

Davo456gt

640 posts

85 months

Monday 5th December 2016
quotequote all
"Much of its greater usability was down to the 6.2-litre V12, an evolution of the Diablo's Colombo 6.0-litre V12, while all-wheel drive was standard on every model."

Jesus, guys do some proper research - the engine is not from a Ferrari!

Bizzarini designed the 350GT engine, which powered all V12 Lamborghini's until the Aventador.
Colombo was a Ferrari engine design.