RE: Ford Fiesta ST: PH Used Buying Guide

RE: Ford Fiesta ST: PH Used Buying Guide

Tuesday 13th February

Ford Fiesta ST: PH Used Buying Guide

In the market for Ford's pocket rocket? Take PH's pocket buying guide along for the ride.



Ford got it absolutely spot on when it launched the ST version of the Fiesta Mk7. Every millimetre the modern small hatch, it packed 182hp from its sizzling 1.6-litre turbo engine and delivered 0-62mph in 6.9 seconds. Not outrageously fast, but more than enough to have fun on back roads while retaining everyday practicality.

Find out what we thought of the new Ford Fiesta ST

That's the essence of a hot hatch and the ST also came with a starting price of just under £17,000, though most buyers ignored the base ST1 and headed for the ST2 for £1,000 more. This bagged you half-leather Recaro seats, rear privacy glass, keyless ignition with starter button, as well as a Sony DAB stereo and daytime running lights. A Style Pack could be added that brought a dark grey finish for the 17-inch alloy wheels, red brake calipers and illuminated sill plates.


The ST3 version arrived slightly later and came with cruise and climate control, auto lights and wipers, keyless entry, power folding door mirrors. You could also add sat-nav to this version.

From launch, the ST sold like hot coffee on a cold morning and Ford wisely left it alone for most of the ST's life. Alongside this, Ford sanctioned a Mountune upgrade that lifted power to 215hp and realised the full potential of this hot hatch. The only significant updates during the ST's life were tweaks to the suspension in mid-2015 to soften the rear shock absorbers and add a thicker front anti-roll bar. This improved ride quality and further crisped up turn-in.

The ST200 arrived in late 2016 with this suspension set-up as standard. Essentially, the 200 was a Mountune-equipped car direct from the factory. However, its gearbox featured shorter ratios and final drive to make it feel more insistent, and it covered 0-62mph in 6.7 seconds. All were finished in a unique Storm Grey. After that, the only change to the line-up was the option of a five-door version that pitched up in September 2016.

Now you can own a Ford Fiesta ST Mk7 from £8,000, which gets you an ST2 with 45,000 miles and full service record. An ST3 will cost around £1,000 more but should have sat-nav included, while Mountune-modified cars start from around £10,000. As for the ST1, there are very few about and you should pay slightly less than for an ST2.

Inspired? Buy a Ford Fiesta ST here



Bodywork and interior

Check the illuminated sill plate lights up on cars with the Style Pack fitted.

The paint on the front bumper and bonnet appears to be quite thin and more prone to stone chips than many rivals, so inspect these areas carefully for damage or signs of a mismatched respray.

ST2 comes with half-leather Recaro front seats, rear privacy glass and a Powerstart button.

ST3 gains KeyFree keyless entry, cruise control, climate in place of air con, auto wipers and lights, electrically folding door mirrors.

Make sure the DAB radio works. If not, Ford may replace it under warranty or through goodwill depending on the age of the car.

Door seals on this generation of Fiesta can pull away from the door frame and allow wind noise and rain to get into the cabin. New seals will sort this.

The Style Pack was an option that came with red brake calipers, illuminated sill plates and a dark grey finish for the alloy wheels.

Daytime running lights dim when the indicator is used but can remain dim when the indicator is cancelled. New DRLs are the only permanent fix.


Engine and transmission

A recall was issued at the beginning of 2018 for a potential cylinder head crack caused by overheating. It affects Fiesta STs built from the start of production up to the end of 2014.

Listen for any knocking from the engine bay. It's most likely to be an upper engine mount that's worn and allowing the motor to rock. If it fails completely, it can allow the driveshafts to come loose. An uprated poly bush is available.

The clutch slave cylinder can fail due to cheap plastic parts. Replacements are cheap. The clutch bleed pipe can also fail and leave the pedal flat on the floor, though this tends to afflict later cars.

Mountune MP215 is a common upgrade that lifts power to 215hp and gives 0-62mph in 6.4 seconds. The same company's MR230 pack offers 230hp and acceleration from rest to 60mph in 5.9 seconds.

Other possible modifications include a quick shifter for the gearbox and a Quaife limited slip differential. Ask to see receipts for this work and parts.

Servicing is needed every 12,500 miles or 12 months.

Suspension and steering

Lowering springs from the likes of Eibach and Mountune work well on the ST.

Like all Fiestas from this generation, the front track rods wear, so listen for any knocks and feel for any vagueness in the steering and turn-in.


Wheels, tyres and brakes

Check the inside edges of the front tyres for greater wear than the rest of the tread. It's a common problem that's solved with an alignment check and set-up.


SPECIFICATION - FORD FIESTA ST

Engine: 1,596cc 4-cyl/inline
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Power (hp): 182/200@5,700rpm
Torque (lb ft): 177/214@5,000/2,500-5,000rpm
MPG: 47.9/46.3
CO2: 138/140g/km
Price new: £16,995/£22,745
Price now: £8,000 upwards

Author
Discussion

Greenbot35

Original Poster:

35 posts

23 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
Any advice on the security issues? that's been the big worry for me putting me of buying one.

alexrogers92

45 posts

24 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
Finally a PH buying guide thats widely applicable and may be of some use to the masses!

It may be worth noting that these get stolen for fun. Budget for an 'OBD relocation' to be carried out on the car, or uprated 'ghost' immobiliser system to stop the thieves running away with it.

Other than that, helpful stuff!

alangla

1,598 posts

111 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
Disklok is the usual tactic. I've got one fitted to mine. Some people fit either locked boxes round the OBD socket or move the connector and fit a dummy socket/blanking plate.

Limpet

2,856 posts

91 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
OBD relocation and physical security a must. These can be driven away in less than 30 seconds by a scrote with a plug in box.

Ahbefive

10,802 posts

102 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
Greenbot35 said:
Any advice on the security issues? that's been the big worry for me putting me of buying one.
Same advice as with any manufacturers offering keyless entry. Try and keep it out of sight, relocate the obd2 port and maybe buy a disklok. This is not an issue unique to Ford.

Edited by Ahbefive on Tuesday 13th February 11:40

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MJK 24

5,128 posts

166 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
Limpet said:
OBD relocation and physical security a must. These can be driven away in less than 30 seconds by a scrote with a plug in box.
Would buying an ST1 that has an old fashioned key and ignition barrel make the car more difficult to steal?

culpz

3,866 posts

42 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
Wasn't there a design issue with the standard boost pipes from factory? Not sure if it affected just the early models but many reported them coming off, which leads to a complete lack of boost. They can be clipped back on but the same issue can occur. Not sure if there was an official fix from Ford for it.

culpz

3,866 posts

42 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
MJK 24 said:
Would buying an ST1 that has an old fashioned key and ignition barrel make the car more difficult to steal?
You do get much less for your money though. They don't represent that great value in comparison but, yes, i suppose it does solve the issue. I suppose that's only one aspect of theft and wouldn't deter home invasions or even car-jackers.

You get the really basic stereo, cloth seats and non-led headlights too. I thought they were quite rare but AT has a fair few for sale. They don't actually look as bad as i first thought and there is less to go wrong.

Jim the Sunderer

1,682 posts

112 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
After a year of ownership my somewhat brief buying guide is as follows:

Don't, unless the roads you use are as smooth as billiard tables.

sc0tt

15,486 posts

131 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
Jim the Sunderer said:
After a year of ownership my somewhat brief buying guide is as follows:

Don't, unless the roads you use are as smooth as billiard tables.
hehe

I would agree. I have the use of my better half's VW Polo and if we are going anywhere of significant distance we don't take the fiesta.

llcoolmac

19 posts

30 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
sc0tt said:
hehe

I would agree. I have the use of my better half's VW Polo and if we are going anywhere of significant distance we don't take the fiesta.
I would disagree. I have a May 2016 car and I have found it surprisingly comfortable. It's firm but never jarring and even my brother who hates hard cars was surprised at it.

Mine (and all cars from late 2015) has the softer springs that came on the ST200 though so in my opinion a 2016+ car is well worth going for and quite comfortable.

mr_fibuli

946 posts

125 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
Jim the Sunderer said:
After a year of ownership my somewhat brief buying guide is as follows:

Don't, unless the roads you use are as smooth as billiard tables.
If you are coming from a Clio 200 Cup the Fiesta ride feels luxurious in comparison - though I think ours has the revised suspension which is supposed to be a bit softer.

J4CKO

24,347 posts

130 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
Just remove the ODB fuse for a simple fix, the theft of keyless ones requires you to get to the ODB port via a deadspot on the alarm perimeter and it be live to clone a key or whatever they do, if its not live it means they have to go under the bonnet and fit a fuse, which will trigger the alarm and thus makes it more of a problem to steal.

As for the car, driven my sons a bit and I love it, proper old school Hot Hatch feel, not that fast, but fast enough and you can carry speed, I followed a Mountuined badged one across country in my 350Z and struggled to keep up.

Plus, loads of tuning options, not sure it needs 300 bhp but they feel a bit held back as standard, I reckon with 230/240 bhp that would really be enough, can get that from a remap and a few supporting mods.

Main problems are most at 3 doors, the doors are long and the ride can set your teeth on edge, other than that, my son loves his, I wouldnt mind one myself but cant have three Fiestas on the drive, two looks bad enough, three looks like you are properly mental Fiesta fetishists.

sc0tt

15,486 posts

131 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
llcoolmac said:
sc0tt said:
hehe

I would agree. I have the use of my better half's VW Polo and if we are going anywhere of significant distance we don't take the fiesta.
I would disagree. I have a May 2016 car and I have found it surprisingly comfortable. It's firm but never jarring and even my brother who hates hard cars was surprised at it.

Mine (and all cars from late 2015) has the softer springs that came on the ST200 though so in my opinion a 2016+ car is well worth going for and quite comfortable.
Have you been in one with harder springs then?

WCZ

5,295 posts

124 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
firm but depends what you're used to. wonderful car and is perfect with the mr260 package
worth getting the mountune springs too as they reduce the crashiness

J4CKO

24,347 posts

130 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
WCZ said:
firm but depends what you're used to. wonderful car and is perfect with the mr260 package
worth getting the mountune springs too as they reduce the crashiness
True, was a shock after Merc on Airmatic biggrin

David87

4,806 posts

142 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
ST1 models do have DRLs, it's just they're halogen rather than LED. Also, the rear lamp design was updated at some point, probably at the same time as the suspension modifications.

cjm

446 posts

198 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
Flicking through a Fiesta ST brochure would be more useful than this buying guide!

Edited by cjm on Tuesday 13th February 13:54

RumbleOfThunder

2,501 posts

133 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
It is a very lightweight guide...

blade7

7,824 posts

146 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
Small quick relatively cheap FWD hatchback sticks to the road like s*it to a blanket and Sunday drivers complain it's stiffly sprung. It's so good lots of people buy them, then car snobs moan they see them everywhere rolleyes