RE: Jeep Wrangler Rubicon: Spotted

RE: Jeep Wrangler Rubicon: Spotted

Thursday 7th March

Jeep Wrangler Rubicon: Spotted

You can barely move for new softroaders these days. A secondhand Rubicon is the antidote



What with Sam having driven the new Wrangler just a couple of weeks ago and Mopar having brought its fantastic Wrangler 1941 to Geneva, my appetite for uncompromising American 4x4s has been thoroughly whetted. It seems I wasn't the only one, either.

A number of commenters on the first drive signaled that they liked the car, but couldn't find a way to rationalise its near Β£50k price tag. Scrof took a shot at finding a half priced alternative in last week's Trade Off, settling, naturally, on a Land Rover Defender. But what if only a Jeep will do?


That's where today's Spotted comes in. At Β£35,955 it still isn't cheap, but manages to represent a significant saving versus the new model nonetheless. That's despite being virtually new itself; a 2018 three-door version with just 4,800 miles on the clock. Most importantly, though, it's a Rubicon. Named after the 22-mile off-road trail, rather than the Italian river of no return, the title of Rubicon is only awarded to the most capable Wranglers in the range

Powered by a 3.6-litre petrol V6, the Rubicon outputs 285hp and 260lb ft of torque via either a six-speed manual or five-speed automatic transmission (the UK was auto only). There are 17-inch aluminum wheels wrapped in 32-inch mud-terrain tyres as standard, locking front and rear axles, Jeep's Rock-Trac 4x4 system featuring beefed up suspension, an electronically disconnecting front sway bar, rock rails and LED lights.


This being the Recon Edition it trades cloth seats for heated leather ones with red seat belts. It also gains a heavy-duty Dana 44 front axle, cast diff covers, power dome bonnet and a premium soft-top which the hard top seen here can be switched out for. Throw in the remainder of the factory warranty, which runs for two more years till 2021, and what you're looking at is one of the most able, best equipped Jeeps you're likely to see without spending twice the price on some heavily modified rock-crawling juggernaut. We know where our money would go.


SPECIFICATIONS - JEEP WRANGLER RUBICON
Engine:
3,604cc, V6
Transmission: 5-speed automatic, all-wheel drive
Power (hp): 285@6,400rpm
Torque (lb ft): 260@4,800rpm
MPG: 24.4
CO2: N/A
First registered: 2018
Recorded mileage: 4,800
Yours for: Β£35,995

See the full ad here

Author
Discussion

John.Taylor

Original Poster:

35 posts

126 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
Four Jeep stories in a little over a week, how much they paying you?

RenesisEvo

3,084 posts

165 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
Having driven one of these, I couldn't justify it at even a fifth of the price tag listed. It was horrifyingly unstable on B-roads, no sense that the axles had any connection to the body - responses were often out of sync or just plain random. A hopeless mix of anaemic V6 connected to a preposterously-tall geared slushbox that wants to slip all the time. It never feels like it has over 200bhp. A mile straight and I couldn't reach the redline in 3rd gear. And I couldn't hear myself think such was the wind noise. The interior has exposed fasteners everywhere and competes only with the old Defender for quality and design.

If you don't ever go above 40mph and/or love rock-crawling or posing on beaches, go ahead. Otherwise buy a brand-new Jimny (or two) and spend the change on a holiday to America where it might just about make sense to hire one for a few days.

Andeh1

5,470 posts

152 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
RenesisEvo said:
Having driven one of these, I couldn't justify it at even a fifth of the price tag listed. It was horrifyingly unstable on B-roads, no sense that the axles had any connection to the body - responses were often out of sync or just plain random. A hopeless mix of anaemic V6 connected to a preposterously-tall geared slushbox that wants to slip all the time. It never feels like it has over 200bhp. A mile straight and I couldn't reach the redline in 3rd gear. And I couldn't hear myself think such was the wind noise. The interior has exposed fasteners everywhere and competes only with the old Defender for quality and design.

If you don't ever go above 40mph and/or love rock-crawling or posing on beaches, go ahead. Otherwise buy a brand-new Jimny (or two) and spend the change on a holiday to America where it might just about make sense to hire one for a few days.
I mean, surely that post signifies the end of the thread!? There is nothing more to say.

unsprung

3,563 posts

70 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
RenesisEvo said:
no sense that the axles had any connection to the body - responses were often out of sync or just plain random.
hehe

RenesisEvo said:
A hopeless mix of anaemic V6 connected to a preposterously-tall geared slushbox that wants to slip all the time.
laugh

RenesisEvo said:
competes only with the old Defender for quality and design.
wobble

RenesisEvo said:
If you don't ever go above 40mph
rofl


Wrangler Total US Sales

2018 . . . 240,032
2017 . . . 190,522
2016 . . . 191,788
2015 . . . 202,702
2014 . . . 175,328
2013 . . . 155,502
2012 . . . 141,669
2011 . . . 122,460
2010 . . . .. 94,310
2009 . . . .. 82,044


BFleming

1,373 posts

89 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
I was in California last May, and had one of these as a hire car. As the weather was nice, we took the roof panels off, & stored them in the back. All very awkward, but driving around the hills of San Fran & over the Golden Gate in it was cool. I can see the appeal.
Then we took the 101 south to San Jose, and it's not a motorway car. The engine (in our one) was underpowered, the auto gearbox didn't know where to place itself, and the suspension was choppy - nowhere near as soft as those tyres would have you believe.
I'd drive one (& did), but I wouldn't pay for one.

300bhp/ton

37,406 posts

136 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
RenesisEvo said:
Having driven one of these, I couldn't justify it at even a fifth of the price tag listed. It was horrifyingly unstable on B-roads, no sense that the axles had any connection to the body - responses were often out of sync or just plain random. A hopeless mix of anaemic V6 connected to a preposterously-tall geared slushbox that wants to slip all the time. It never feels like it has over 200bhp. A mile straight and I couldn't reach the redline in 3rd gear. And I couldn't hear myself think such was the wind noise. The interior has exposed fasteners everywhere and competes only with the old Defender for quality and design.

If you don't ever go above 40mph and/or love rock-crawling or posing on beaches, go ahead. Otherwise buy a brand-new Jimny (or two) and spend the change on a holiday to America where it might just about make sense to hire one for a few days.
I suspect you are the sort of person who uses hammer to put screws in, then moans they don't work properly.... rolleyes talk about missing the point.

300bhp/ton

37,406 posts

136 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
That one is not fitted MT tyres.... Might want to look at the pics of it ed wink

They are awesome vehicles and really not half as bad on road as some are making out. They are easily as good a Discovery 1. And a Discovery 1 is just a Range Rover classic in a different frock. And people rarely moan about how an RRC goes on the road. The Jeep is arguably much better in many respects. And off road, in Rubicon guise it 2 levels higher than a stock RRC.

RenesisEvo

3,084 posts

165 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
unsprung said:
rofl


Wrangler Total US Sales

2018 . . . 240,032
2017 . . . 190,522
2016 . . . 191,788
2015 . . . 202,702
2014 . . . 175,328
2013 . . . 155,502
2012 . . . 141,669
2011 . . . 122,460
2010 . . . .. 94,310
2009 . . . .. 82,044
I did allude to the fact it makes sense in America. Driving environments, culture and lifestyle are very different over there. I could post Defender sales figures in the UK - or the VW Beetle in Mexico, or Hindustan Ambassador, and so on. Just because a particular car sells well in a particular market doesn't mean it's objectively good at all times, in all situations, in all markets. I'm sure had I taken it rock-crawling in Nevada I'd have had a great time. But for general driving on UK roads it was abysmal, in my opinion.

300bhp/ton said:
I suspect you are the sort of person who uses hammer to put screws in, then moans they don't work properly.... rolleyes talk about missing the point.
Nope that's not me. What point have I missed? That I drove one on the roads in the UK, and that's not what it's suited for? But if you buy one in the UK (as per the advert), at some point you will have to drive it on a B road, and its shortcomings don't exactly hide themselves. I understand fully that it has one-dimensional capability to the detriment / ignorance of most other attributes. Like a Tesla. That doesn't justify the price (to me). Others who love Jeeps beyond all things might disagree, and they're welcome to.

300bhp/ton

37,406 posts

136 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
RenesisEvo said:
300bhp/ton said:
I suspect you are the sort of person who uses hammer to put screws in, then moans they don't work properly.... rolleyes talk about missing the point.
Nope that's not me. What point have I missed? That I drove one on the roads in the UK, and that's not what it's suited for? But if you buy one in the UK (as per the advert), at some point you will have to drive it on a B road, and its shortcomings don't exactly hide themselves. I understand fully that it has one-dimensional capability to the detriment / ignorance of most other attributes. Like a Tesla. That doesn't justify the price (to me). Others who love Jeeps beyond all things might disagree, and they're welcome to.
The really aren't 1 dimensional and will go from A to B perfectly fine on any road in Britain, without being dangerous or uncomfortable. I suspect you got in it and tried to drive it like an Evo or something. Your car history doesn't suggest much familiarity with 4x4's.

A live axle vehicle will handle and feel very different to one with independent suspension. If you aren't used to this, then maybe it felt odd to you, but that doesn't mean it wasn't capable.

I'm not knocking you for not liking it, that is of course your personal choice. The Jeeps, including the JK and other live axle 4x4's I've driven and owned (have 3 at the moment) are all very enjoyable cars to drive and B roads are often places they excel.

Avdb

137 posts

64 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
My 5-door Wrangler is well capable both on and off road. For parking and nipping round to the supermarket it is better to use something else.


Discombobulate

3,553 posts

132 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
Ours Jeep is a farm / snow vehicle bought instead of a Defender. More car for your money - as good off road, and better on it. Not so good for towing though.

cheddar

4,217 posts

120 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
I don't understand the article, it's aimed at those who think that the new Wrangler is too expensive and therefore might consider purchasing the previous generation but it's still THIRTY SIX THOUSAND POUNDS !

RenesisEvo

3,084 posts

165 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
300bhp/ton said:
The really aren't 1 dimensional and will go from A to B perfectly fine on any road in Britain, without being dangerous or uncomfortable. I suspect you got in it and tried to drive it like an Evo or something. Your car history doesn't suggest much familiarity with 4x4's.
My car history in my garage in no way reflects the cars I have experienced, only those I have owned personally. I have done thousands of miles in a host of SUVs and 4x4s, including Range Rover, Range Rover Sport, Discovery (4 and 5) Defender (90 and 110, diesel and V8), Outlander, Hilux, Bentayga, MB GLA, GLE63, GLS63, G63, G500 4x4^2 (yes really - mini monster truck!), G500 (new one), Cayenne, Macan, Levante. There might be more I can't recall them all. Admittedly there are mostly independently or air sprung. There's an equally long list of sports cars and saloons, it would take a long time to have them all listed in my PH garage.

I think it's a real stretch to suggest it they 'excel' on anything other than the most broken of B roads, in my opinion - I don't disagree they could be fun, and there are time where live axles might be an advantage. If I had to be kind the FM reception for the radio was pretty good thanks to the long aerial, and the road noise wasn't bad, the removable panels seal well considering. I just cannot square the price against what you (don't) get. I'd happily take the same cash and enjoy a new Land Cruiser Utility.

The test driver

934 posts

105 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
RenesisEvo said:
My car history in my garage in no way reflects the cars I have experienced, only those I have owned personally. I have done thousands of miles in a host of SUVs and 4x4s, including Range Rover, Range Rover Sport, Discovery (4 and 5) Defender (90 and 110, diesel and V8), Outlander, Hilux, Bentayga, MB GLA, GLE63, GLS63, G63, G500 4x4^2 (yes really - mini monster truck!), G500 (new one), Cayenne, Macan, Levante. There might be more I can't recall them all. Admittedly there are mostly independently or air sprung. There's an equally long list of sports cars and saloons, it would take a long time to have them all listed in my PH garage.

I think it's a real stretch to suggest it they 'excel' on anything other than the most broken of B roads, in my opinion - I don't disagree they could be fun, and there are time where live axles might be an advantage. If I had to be kind the FM reception for the radio was pretty good thanks to the long aerial, and the road noise wasn't bad, the removable panels seal well considering. I just cannot square the price against what you (don't) get. I'd happily take the same cash and enjoy a new Land Cruiser Utility.
Do people avoid you at parties?

cheddar

4,217 posts

120 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
The test driver said:
Do people avoid you at parties?
Unnecessary.

I liked his post

Andeh1

5,470 posts

152 months

Thursday 7th March
quotequote all
The test driver said:
Do people avoid you at parties?
On the contrary, his vehicle history alone suggests someone who's opinion is worth hearing!

kbf1981

2,022 posts

146 months

Friday 8th March
quotequote all
They're great off road. If you want an actual off roader with a proper chassis, this is about the only car on sale today.

I drive a Defender day to day and it's more comfortable than my Lotus Exige V6 was, massively so.

I have a new 992 on order and will probably choose between than and the Defender day to day.

People who criticise them and cars like them just have no real idea about what these cars are or why they're set up the way they are. They're set up to be bashed about off road and not break. Not for cornering on b roads. If you want that... Buy a fking sports car.

300bhp/ton

37,406 posts

136 months

Friday 8th March
quotequote all
RenesisEvo said:
I think it's a real stretch to suggest it they 'excel' on anything other than the most broken of B roads, in my opinion - I don't disagree they could be fun, and there are time where live axles might be an advantage. If I had to be kind the FM reception for the radio was pretty good thanks to the long aerial, and the road noise wasn't bad, the removable panels seal well considering. I just cannot square the price against what you (don't) get. I'd happily take the same cash and enjoy a new Land Cruiser Utility.
A Land Cruiser Utility is more expensive than this and less capable overall. And by a large margin off road. They also look fugly. I kind of like them, but think there is even less point in them. And I don't ever recall seeing one on the road.

Live axle 4x4's might "jiggle" and "shudder" more over bumps due to the live axle. But they generally remain very well planted. Any choppiness in ride will be down to the wheelbase. The SWB Wrangler is still only 95".

I'm just unsure what your real beef is with how they go, seems more like you have an agenda.

As for the price, yes utterly stupid. But UK customers seem to get ripped off on many products from either the USA or Japan and this is a good example of that.

300bhp/ton

37,406 posts

136 months

Friday 8th March
quotequote all
kbf1981 said:
They're great off road. If you want an actual off roader with a proper chassis, this is about the only car on sale today.

I drive a Defender day to day and it's more comfortable than my Lotus Exige V6 was, massively so.

I have a new 992 on order and will probably choose between than and the Defender day to day.

People who criticise them and cars like them just have no real idea about what these cars are or why they're set up the way they are. They're set up to be bashed about off road and not break. Not for cornering on b roads. If you want that... Buy a fking sports car.
Defenders are surprisingly capable on the road (way behind an Elise or Porsche). You really can throw them into corners like you wouldn't believe. I'm not saying they will be the fastest or the most comfy doing it, but they feel sure footed and actually "handle" from a feel point of view rather well. Obviously they will have less total grip and more body roll than a regular car.

The Jeeps I've driven have been equally as good. The biggest downside with the Wrangler is it is only 2wd for road use, so far more likely to want to kick it's tail out.

When I ran my XJ Cherokee I could run it in 2wd or 4wd on the road as it had a centre diff (like a Defender). It had live axles front and rear and even leaf springs at the back. Although a slightly longer wheelbase than a SWB Wrangler. It felt nothing but planted on the road and was in many ways quite a sleeper out on the country lanes.

At a mostly tarmac event, the Jeep ran quicker stage times than two of the three MX-5's competing.




The JK's I've been in have been equally as good.

Shakermaker

9,737 posts

46 months

Friday 8th March
quotequote all
cheddar said:
I don't understand the article, it's aimed at those who think that the new Wrangler is too expensive and therefore might consider purchasing the previous generation but it's still THIRTY SIX THOUSAND POUNDS !
I have similar thoughts.

The fact that these cost, new, near enough the same as a Discovery is pretty shocking. And whilst I know they cater to slightly different markets, they're a size class apart at least in terms of what market sector they fit into.