RE: Ferrari F430 manual: Spotted

RE: Ferrari F430 manual: Spotted

Thursday 21st March

Ferrari F430 manual: Spotted

This last manual, V8 Ferrari Berlinetta is still (just) less than £100k - and looking better than ever



There's something timelessly cool about a supercar with a manual gearbox. There's the romance of an Italian open gate, the drama of seeing them in feature films and, more recently, the realisation that automated manuals have aged as well as the compact disc. Modern methods are more efficient, the older ways are more satisfying to use. Now in a world where even the B-segment hot hatch is being denied the manual gearbox, the prospect of a high-revving, mid-engined, V8 sports car with three pedals is even more enticing than it's ever been.

When even Ferrari couldn't get the F1 gearbox right until the very end - the 430 Scuderia typically regarded as the best installation of the technology - something like this F430 looks, arguably, better than it ever has. It has the further advantage of being from that era of post-millennium but pre-financial crisis where engines, power outputs and size, well, just sort of worked. A 360 Modena from before the 430 will be nearly 20 years old now, and the 355 - lovely thing though it is - could well feel a bit lacking given the current performance of fast cars. Jump ahead and the 458 had very nearly 600hp. 'Sweet spot' is a trite phrase, though there's something in the F430, lacking turbos and still offering that manual gearbox, that must surely appeal to a decent chunk of enthusiasts.


Both it and the 599 of the same era are from that transitory phrase in Ferrari's history, where science and aerodynamics were beginning to have an influence, yet at their heart they were still quite traditional supercars - the combination of old and new now looks very intriguing. Because there's going to be a Race mode, and traction control, and (you would hope) sufficient durability to make regular use feasible, but also with the distinctly old-school vibe offered by the powertrain, gearbox and dimensions.

Now nobody will ever claim the 430 as one of Ferrari's greatest designs. This one does at least counter with the go-to Berlinetta spec - Rosso Corsa with Crema - a Challenge-style rear grille as well as a seemingly peerless condition and comprehensive service history to back up its 38,000 miles. And yes, £100,000 will look like huge money when it's remembered this is basically what the car cost new, but that reflects the significance these cars now have. After this was the saw the advent of more technology and more performance, the cars of the 2000s the final link back to those manual icons that so many grew up with. And if this looks a lot, bear in mind that F430s with fewer miles have been advertised at anything up to £150,000; furthermore, a manual 599 GTB made $500,000 at auction last January, and a California manual more than $400,000 in 2016. The demand is already there for manual, modern Ferraris, and only looks set to grow as the future arrives and the past looks ever more distant.


Handily for the F430, it's hard to know what to compare it to as a manual supercar of the era. Of course the Gallardo is there, but in the search for supercar purity its four-wheel drive may put some off. Might a 997 GT3 seem a bit common? And while a DB9 manual is an interesting curio, it's going to feel pretty leaden to drive by comparison. All other suggestions welcome...

Convinced yet? While the standard 430, along with the standard 360 in fact, may struggle for recognition (with the glorious 355 before, and the epoch-defining 458 after), the manual gearbox gives it an added dimension of appeal. Nobody in their right mind will ever covet an automated manual gearbox, but a good proper manual will only ever get more and more attractive as its contemporary use dwindles. While high already, it's easy to imagine demand for cars like this F430 increasing further all too soon. Happy click-clacking to the next owner...


SPECIFICATION - FERRARI F430

Engine: 4,308cc V8
Transmission: 6-speed manual, rear-wheel drive
Power (hp): 490@8,500rpm
Torque (lb ft): 343@5,250rpm
MPG: 15.4
CO2: 420g/km
Recorded mileage: 38,000
Year registered: 2006
Price new: N/A
Price now: £99,950

Click here to see the original ad.

Author
Discussion

gonnagetyoursBenny

Original Poster:

39 posts

45 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
LP-550-2 had a manual option?

mrclav

766 posts

163 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
Yes, and PH already did a piece on one - https://www.pistonheads.com/news/ph-eurocars/lambo...

LaurasOtherHalf

14,629 posts

136 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
What's the British obsession with Creme interiors in Ferrari's? Old man magnolia-bizzare.

I also think the 430 lost some of the delicate good looks of the 360 that preceded it but these are all semantics I guess-if nothing else at 38k miles it's nice to see a car that's been enjoyed.

Or not had a haircut like most others wink

smartypants

39,406 posts

109 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
Was never really a fan of the 430 when it came out, just looked a bit fussy... But I think it's aged well, unlike the 360.


Slippydiff

10,254 posts

163 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
LaurasOtherHalf said:
What's the British obsession with Creme interiors in Ferrari's? Old man magnolia-bizzare.

I also think the 430 lost some of the delicate good looks of the 360 that preceded it but these are all semantics I guess-if nothing else at 38k miles it's nice to see a car that's been enjoyed.

Or not had a haircut like most others wink
Or enjoyed AND had a haircut .... biggrin

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humphra

47 posts

32 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
Sadly, it feels like car prices are on a trajectory whereby more and more cars are going to be seen as investments, than something to be used and enjoyed. This is a good car, a nice car, but £100k? Really?? In the Ferrari stable, it's a standard production car, rather than a special or limited run model.

Just seems sad that the investors could be taking over, rather than the drivers.

Krikkit

14,778 posts

121 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
LaurasOtherHalf said:
What's the British obsession with Creme interiors in Ferrari's? Old man magnolia-bizzare.
I think tobacco or cream interior on a Ferrari is a global marmite thing. For me I'd have rosso red with tobacco, tour de france with cream.

Dr G

13,574 posts

182 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
LaurasOtherHalf said:
What's the British obsession with Creme interiors in Ferrari's? Old man magnolia-bizzare.
Because a sizable proportion of owners (curators?) seem more interested in the perception of what a future owner will want (resale red, low miles) than what they themselves might enjoy.

The red with magnolia is pretty gopping, on any other car the salesman would be praying never to be offered it back in part exchange laugh

smartypants

39,406 posts

109 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
Red with creme interior always for 80s/90s Ferraris


alec.e

1,114 posts

64 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
I personally love the interior, black leather is usually a instant no for me

thegreenhell

5,294 posts

159 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
Perfect donor car for a MAT Stratos.

NJJ

152 posts

20 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
Has anyone on here got any experience with a manual 430? Would love to know what they are like vs. 360/355 etc...

cmoose

44,077 posts

169 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
smartypants said:
Was never really a fan of the 430 when it came out, just looked a bit fussy... But I think it's aged well, unlike the 360.
I'm kind of the opposite in that I've never thought the 360 was a real looker, but it's somewhat pretty and looks a little better with a few years under its belt.

430 is a complete and utter mess, a chintzfest inside and out, to my eye. Might be a decent drive. And I'm not hugely, er, looks orientated. But the 430's visuals would, I think, always be a deal breaker.

Esceptico

1,609 posts

49 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
The 430 scud looks so much better to my eyes than the normal 430. I do like manuals but the automated manual in the Scud suited the car in my view.

I almost bought this one for CHF 135k back in 2013 but ended up getting a 355 instead (as that had been a dream Ferrari when younger).


cmoose

44,077 posts

169 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
Slippydiff said:
Or enjoyed AND had a haircut .... biggrin
My thoughts, exactly! hehe

cmoose

44,077 posts

169 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
Esceptico said:
The 430 scud looks so much better to my eyes than the normal 430.
And produces substantially more downforce...

thelostboy

3,302 posts

165 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
thegreenhell said:
Perfect donor car for a MAT Stratos.
True.

Because, for me, the 430 is not a well resolved looking car. The rear buttresses particularly are not nice.

As always though, a car with a bit of 'stance' always looks better - the Scuderia is a big improvement!

Guvernator

9,802 posts

105 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
I agree £100k might sound a lot but as the last of the baby Ferrari's offered with that fantastic open gate manual, I can only see values going one way tbh.

hungry_hog

960 posts

128 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
Looks lovely, IMO one of the nicer looking Ferraris of last 20 years. They got rid of the "soap bar" look of the 360 (I do like the CS though!)

Hopefully I can try it one day, have tried 360 and 458.

For people that have driven all three - is it closer to the 360 or 458, I'm guessing the former?

Lotusgone

117 posts

67 months

Thursday 21st March
quotequote all
humphra said:
Sadly, it feels like car prices are on a trajectory whereby more and more cars are going to be seen as investments, than something to be used and enjoyed. This is a good car, a nice car, but £100k? Really?? In the Ferrari stable, it's a standard production car, rather than a special or limited run model.

Just seems sad that the investors could be taking over, rather than the drivers.
Regrettably so. A mate of mine regularly bends my ear about cryptocurrencies, and how more money has been printed/created/quantitivelyeased in the last few years that in the whole of history before. It's looking for a home given low interest rates and pushing asking prices ever upwards. Reading the adverts is less fun than it used to be, so many cars are way out of reach.