RE: Morgan Roadster: Spotted

RE: Morgan Roadster: Spotted

Sunday 28th April

Morgan Roadster: Spotted

This 12-year-old Roadster has 116,000 miles on the clock. Bold



Morgans are charming things, but are they suitable for daily use? Not unless your commute is along the Riviera. Well, that’s what one might have thought, until stumbling across a 12-year-old Roadster that has an odometer displaying the number 116,000. No, not kilometres, and it’s not an ad typo, either; we double checked with the dealer. Today’s Spotted has recorded genuine miles.

Amongst Roadsters in the classifieds with almost one-hundredth of that mileage, this one stands strong as proof that even a car with an ash-frame and styling straight out of the fifties can be put into such regular use that it very nearly matches the national average. Whether they’ve been accrued fighting through motorway traffic each morning or traversing back and forth across the continent on holiday, we doff our hats.


The Roadster is certainly fit for the purpose of border-crossing voyages. With an all-aluminium Ford Duratec V6 producing 226hp under its long bonnet, the it’s revered as being a smooth, effortless cruiser – one boasting delivery and tone akin to a vintage straight-six Brit but with enough punch to sprint from zero to 62mph in 4.9 seconds. Because it weighs only 940kg, ride and handling are also rather good, although you’d need to have ignored the last thirty years of motoring to be able to call a Roadster properly refined. 

Some owners claim to comfortably achieve fuel economy in the mid-twenties, which is not only very impressive but also a drastic improvement on the older Plus 8 that preceded the Roadster. There are also few major mechanical risks to report, probably because the engine and five-speed manual gearbox remain in fairly low-stress surroundings in such a lightweight two-seat sports car. A two-month-old MOT certificate and clean history of tests – barring silly fails for a headlight misalignment and broken horn – suggests that this car is in good health.


That being said, it has received a full respray and new chrome bits, which is understandable because that curvaceous body can’t be too effective at avoiding stones and the shiny trim won’t take too well to a life mostly lived outside. But kudos to the previous owner who chose to give the car its new lease of life with the refresh, it can’t have been a cheap job. The tidy interior continues to suggest the former custodians have really cared for the Roadster.

So while plenty of buyers will be instantly turned away by the high number on the odometer, others may see through the digits and view this as a tried and tested opportunity to bag a bargain. Because at under £29,350, it’s by far the cheapest Roadster listed on PH – one you might not lose any money on. Agree?


SPECIFICATIONS - MORGAN ROADSTER

Engine: 2,967, V6
Transmission: 5-speed manual, rear-wheel drive
Power (hp): 226@6,150rpm
Torque (lb ft): 204@4,900rpm
MPG: 29
CO2: 230
First registered: 2007
Recorded mileage: 116,000
Price new: £34,990 (2004)
Yours for: £29,350

Click here to see the full ad.

Author
Discussion

Turbobanana

Original Poster:

1,337 posts

142 months

Sunday 28th April
quotequote all
Properly maintained, well engineered cars like this are a joy to own if they have been used frequently. Kudos to the previous owner.

The best car I ever owned was a Saab 900 turbo bought with 210,000 miles and a spectacular service history.

Buy this, enjoy it and bask in the glow of depreciation-proof motoring.

sawman

4,032 posts

171 months

Sunday 28th April
quotequote all
Cars need to be used to keep them healthy, so many morgans (insert names of other sports cars here) are so lightly used it can cause issues.

I ran a 4/4 as a daily for 4 years, including a weekly commute to kent from the midlands. Prior to my ownership it had averaged 1000 miles a year and consequently has loads of little issues that regular use seemed to iron out.
In future i would be inclined to buy a regularly used car in preference to a garage queen

DoubleD

7,813 posts

49 months

Sunday 28th April
quotequote all
Wow these really hold their value well

sawman

4,032 posts

171 months

Sunday 28th April
quotequote all
DoubleD said:
Wow these really hold their value well
They do, i sold mine for more than i paid after 4 years and 50k miles

mogman888

6 posts

103 months

Sunday 28th April
quotequote all
I have a 1980 +8 which I have owned since 1983 and has now clocked up over 250k miles.
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Turbobanana

Original Poster:

1,337 posts

142 months

Sunday 28th April
quotequote all
mogman888 said:
I have a 1980 +8 which I have owned since 1983 and has now clocked up over 250k miles.
bowclap

Top work sir.

Water Fairy

2,846 posts

96 months

Sunday 28th April
quotequote all
£30K? Really? So many better things for that price. Stuff that won't depreciate too badly either.

Jonny TVR

2,431 posts

222 months

Tuesday 30th April
quotequote all
with morgans I was told that you tend to just lose the VAT on the purchase based on a 3 year ownership. This one is incredible though if the owner gets £30K. Its probably the lowest depreciating new car available. Could you live with it as your everyday car though? There is a guy near me who I see out regularly in all weathers on his commute

ChimpOnGas

8,592 posts

120 months

Wednesday 1st May
quotequote all
Or buy a TVR Chimaera for half the money and use some of the £15k you've saved to to go on a few nice continental touring holidays.

I paid under £8k for my 30,000 mile Chimaera some 10 years ago and it's now worth close to twice that, two years into owning my TVR I invested in a Canems Dual Fuel engine management system which allows the car to make more horsepower and drive far smoother than it ever did from new while consuming either petrol.... or cheap as chips £0.55p (£2.50) a gallon clean burning low carbon LPG.

The result is a true analogue traditional British sports car with a wonderful V8 soundtrack that makes a devastatingly good continental GT, performance is a healthy 0-60 in under 5 seconds and a top speed of 155mph, but it's the mid range thrust 260ft/lbs of torque gives in a car weighing 1,100kgs that really surprises other road users.... and the killer is 90% of all that grunt is available from just 2,000rpm wink

Driven sensibly the car easily averages 22mpg on gas and will cover over 300 miles on one LPG fill, fuel economy that equates to a petrol car delivering 50mpg. I like the Morgan but not at £30,000, a TVR Chimaera gives you a lot more creature comforts for a lot less outlay and with the money you save you can buy yourself many nice touring holidays.

Unlike the Morgan there's plenty of luggage space too, even on LPG and with the roof in the boot the TVR's boot is so huge there's lots of space left over to carry everything a couple needs for a two week trip to Tuscany or the South of France.





https://thumbsnap.com/s/oNdLIKHV.jpg

Just like the Morgan when the time comes to sell the TVR won't have lost you any money either, so for me the more practical, comfortable and better sounding TVR wins all day long. No tweed jacket, pipe, beard and flat cap required either wink


Jonny TVR

2,431 posts

222 months

Wednesday 1st May
quotequote all
ChimpOnGas said:
No tweed jacket, pipe, beard and flat cap required either wink

Thats what stops me buying a Morgan for sure!

Greg the Fish

458 posts

7 months

Wednesday 1st May
quotequote all
ChimpOnGas said:
stuff
Not everyone wants a hairy chested plastic Trevor though do they?

It's a bit like saying 'get a 3 series as it's a saloon car and I have one so they must be good'

DoubleD

7,813 posts

49 months

Wednesday 1st May
quotequote all
ChimpOnGas said:
Or buy a TVR Chimaera for half the money and use some of the £15k you've saved to to go on a few nice continental touring holidays.

I paid under £8k for my 30,000 mile Chimaera some 10 years ago and it's now worth close to twice that, two years into owning my TVR I invested in a Canems Dual Fuel engine management system which allows the car to make more horsepower and drive far smoother than it ever did from new while consuming either petrol.... or cheap as chips £0.55p (£2.50) a gallon clean burning low carbon LPG.

The result is a true analogue traditional British sports car with a wonderful V8 soundtrack that makes a devastatingly good continental GT, performance is a healthy 0-60 in under 5 seconds and a top speed of 155mph, but it's the mid range thrust 260ft/lbs of torque gives in a car weighing 1,100kgs that really surprises other road users.... and the killer is 90% of all that grunt is available from just 2,000rpm wink

Driven sensibly the car easily averages 22mpg on gas and will cover over 300 miles on one LPG fill, fuel economy that equates to a petrol car delivering 50mpg. I like the Morgan but not at £30,000, a TVR Chimaera gives you a lot more creature comforts for a lot less outlay and with the money you save you can buy yourself many nice touring holidays.

Unlike the Morgan there's plenty of luggage space too, even on LPG and with the roof in the boot the TVR's boot is so huge there's lots of space left over to carry everything a couple needs for a two week trip to Tuscany or the South of France.





https://thumbsnap.com/s/oNdLIKHV.jpg

Just like the Morgan when the time comes to sell the TVR won't have lost you any money either, so for me the more practical, comfortable and better sounding TVR wins all day long. No tweed jacket, pipe, beard and flat cap required either wink

How much does the lpg conversion cost? Dont they lose a bit of oomph on lpg as well?

ChimpOnGas

8,592 posts

120 months

Wednesday 1st May
quotequote all
Greg the Fish said:
ChimpOnGas said:
stuff
Not everyone wants a hairy chested plastic Trevor though do they?

It's a bit like saying 'get a 3 series as it's a saloon car and I have one so they must be good'
Hmmmmm scratchchin

Well for starters a Morgan and a 90's TVR are both back to basics analogue British soft tops, both can and often do come with a Rover V8 engine too.

Both brands have their chassis and construction methods rooted firmly in the 1950/60s, and neither could be considered a sensible everyday choice although the TVR is actually streets ahead in this respect.

In many respects the prospective buyers of a Morgan or TVR (or any classic car for that matter) aren't dissimilar, I'm sure many who've looked at Morgan have also looked at a TVR so the comparison is not exactly the polar opposites you suggest.

However, I accept Morgan tends to attract the older buyer of a certain social class, a retired professional with a nice big pension pay out and no mortgage left shall we say, a chap who wants to live the classic 1950's or even pre-war sports car fantasy.

But as we all know the trouble with fantasies is they seldom live up to expectation, respect to whoever did well over 100,000 mikes in this Morgan, but my guess is he's now six foot under having died from severe discomfort and double pneumonia.

ChimpOnGas

8,592 posts

120 months

Wednesday 1st May
quotequote all
DoubleD said:
How much does the lpg conversion cost? Dont they lose a bit of oomph on lpg as well?
Cheap enough to pay for itself in just a few years, these days its just fuel for £2.50 a gallon all the way smokin

The car is actually faster on gas now than it was 23 years ago when it left Bristol Avenue on petrol only wink

Engelberger

151 posts

8 months

Wednesday 1st May
quotequote all
ChimpOnGas said:
Or buy a TVR Chimaera for half the money and use some of the £15k you've saved to repair it
Fixed.

DoubleD

7,813 posts

49 months

Wednesday 1st May
quotequote all
ChimpOnGas said:
DoubleD said:
How much does the lpg conversion cost? Dont they lose a bit of oomph on lpg as well?
Cheap enough to pay for itself in just a few years, these days its just fuel for £2.50 a gallon all the way smokin

The car is actually faster on gas now than it was 23 years ago when it left Bristol Avenue on petrol only wink
How much is the actual conversion though?