RE: Lancia Delta Integrale Evo 1 | Spotted

RE: Lancia Delta Integrale Evo 1 | Spotted

Wednesday 27th November

Lancia Delta Integrale Evo 1 | Spotted

40 years on from the Delta's debut, and more than 30 since its first WRC, what better time to celebrate its success?



In order to mark the 40th anniversary of one of its most evocative designs, Italdesign recently decided to throw a little party. To do so the coachbuilder assembled two-time WRC champion Miki Biasion, legendary automotive designer Giorgetto Giugiaro and whole host of owners to pay homage to the iconic machine which connects them all: the Lancia Delta.

Despite being voted the 1980 European Car of the Year, the standard Lancia Delta was, in many respects, a rather unremarkable five-door hatchback - particularly by PH standards. The Delta HF Integrale which it later spawned, however, was quite the opposite, cementing the model's place in the history books as a world-beating, record-breaking motorsport hero.

It was behind the wheel of a Delta Integrale that Biasion won back to back WRC titles in 1988 and '89, victories which contributed to Lancia's unparalleled streak of six back-to-back Constructors Championships between 1987 and 1992. Then, coinciding with Juha Kankkunen's own second title in 1991, the company gave fans their best chance yet to own a vehicle directly connected to those driven by rally's stars of stage and screen.


The Delta HF Integrale 'Evoluzione' used the same turbocharged 2.0-litre four-cylinder motor found in previous Deltas, though, thanks to features like an upgraded exhaust, output was increased to 210hp and 220lb ft. For drivers who could get the power down via the five-speed manual and all four wheels sufficiently skillfully, this was enough to propel the 1,449kg Evo to 62mph in 6.1 seconds and on to a top speed of 137mph.

To deal with the extra performance expected of a rally champion, the Evo's steering rack was strengthened, its suspension was uprated and larger brakes with dual-piston Brembo calipers were installed. The tracks were widened by 54mm and 60mm respectively front and rear, resulting in aggressively flared wheel arches and a purposeful stance which set the tone before a wheel had turned.

A new body kit including front and rear bumpers, side skirts, a vented bonnet, alternative rear doors, and a manually-adjustable roof spoiler completed the modifications. Then there were the Speedline wheels, which were of the same style as those worn by the rally cars and served to set the rest of the sporting features off. It was an irresistible combination.


Today, the model is widely appreciated, its classic status long since secured in the hearts, and wallets, of buyers. This Monza Red example with black leather and Alcantara interior seems reasonably priced - all things being relative - at a fiver under Β£40,000, then. The ad includes mention of a comprehensive service history and certificate of origin, too, as well as a recently replaced clutch, new cambelt, and Β£10,000 of work to return the car to "a very high standard", meaning the next keeper should hopefully avoid any nasty surprises.

The Evo 1 may not be the final Delta, but may be a more enticing proposition than the subsequent Evo 2 to some - as, due to Lancia's withdrawal from the sport as a manufacturer, that car was never developed into an actual rally machine. It also continues to represent one of the best ways to tick a multitude of bucket-list ownership boxes in one go, being as it is a motorsport-connected, classic Italian, all-wheel drive, manual, hot hatch poster car. So, what better way could there be to celebrate the Delta's 40th birthday, than to see what all the fuss is about for yourself?


SPECIFICATION - LANCIA DELTA HF INTEGRALE EVO 1
Engine:
1,995cc, 4-cyl, turbocharged
Transmission: 5-speed manual, all-wheel drive
Power (hp): 210@5,750rpm
Torque (lb ft): 220@3,500rpm
MPG: N/A
CO2: N/A
First registered: 1991
Mileage: 85,000
Price new: N/A
Price now: Β£39,995

See the original advert here

Search for a Lancia Delta here

Author
Discussion

adingley84

Original Poster:

324 posts

110 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
The older I get, the more I want one, the further out of reach they get! Absolute legend of a car.

Drooles

66 posts

4 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
Same here. Couldn’t get sensible insurance on a Yellow Evo 2 at 21 and since then circumstances or price rises have kept one out of reach

GTEYE

1,456 posts

158 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
A friend had one and I was fortunately allowed a drive in it.

Wow, what a car. I’ve never felt a car so connected to the road, the rally DNA was immediately obvious. An Escort Cosworth also driven at around the time was rubbish in comparison.

Sadly, they were getting rusty back in the early ‘00s and that won’t have stopped and prices now have got rather out of hand.

But a true legend, I’d vote it the best ‘real’ car of the 90s.

Two Slips and a Gully

702 posts

40 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
Probably the best hot hatch of all time.

sledge68

363 posts

145 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
I owned one for 4 years and yes they are a completely different animal to the likes of the escort cosworth.

The integrale was made for one purpose and all the bulges etc are they to serve a purpose, not to grab attention.

Had to sell mine due to a lifestyle change but intend to another soon.

GTEYE said:
A friend had one and I was fortunately allowed a drive in it.

Wow, what a car. I’ve never felt a car so connected to the road, the rally DNA was immediately obvious. An Escort Cosworth also driven at around the time was rubbish in comparison.

Sadly, they were getting rusty back in the early ‘00s and that won’t have stopped and prices now have got rather out of hand.

But a true legend, I’d vote it the best ‘real’ car of the 90s.

sledge68

363 posts

145 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
The bonnet bulge was born out of a need for higher suspension turrets, you can see the welded extensions on top of the turrets in the evo models, so longer travel struts could be used, then the bonnet would not fit so they had to put a bulge in it. Only Lancia.

chelme

704 posts

118 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
The EVO2 is not so different from the EVO1, to be considered a non homologation. It was after all one that was subtly improved over the EVO1 which is why it is coveted the most.

A stunning and immersive experience to drive this car and it looks iconic too.

The engine itself is the most successful motorsport engine of all time, not to mention the car's own unparalleled success...One of the all time greats for certain.

thelostboy

3,664 posts

173 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
Would love one but fear it would be disappointing to be drive. Yellow with maximum angle on the wing please!

Turbobanana

1,559 posts

149 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
In 2000, I had to deliver a brand new M5 to an address in London. It was boring.

The return trip was to be made in a Delta Integrale - nothing special, just a basic 8V, the keys to which were to be picked up from reception at the owner's workplace, somewhere close to the Tower of London. I was directed to the dismal underground car park, where I eventually tracked down a dowdy, dirty looking Delta cowering in a corner with peeling paint, a flat battery and barely any petrol.

A set of jump leads was procured and a passing car flagged down as it was leaving the car park. Soon enough I had it started and cautiously I was on my way, praying the thing would make it first to a petrol station, then 60 miles home.

The engine was left running while I fuelled it, then I locked it (engine still running) with the spare key and paid for the fuel - and probably a Ginster's pasty as well... Nervously I set off.

Within a mile I was grinning like a lunatic, even through London traffic and sitting on the "wrong" side of the car. It was a revelation, and made the M5 look very pedestrian. I later found out that the owner had thrown piles of money at it with pinpoint accuracy, on all the bits that mattered - he had just neglected the cosmetics. The thing drove brilliantly and by the time I got home I was in love.

Next morning it wouldn't start as the battery was flat again. It was a one night stand. I've no idea what happened to it as I left shortly afterwards, but I suspect it was either tracked to within an inch of its life or expensively restored. I should have bought it, as they were relatively cheap at the time, and it rates as my greatest "One That Got Away" car.

I still can't get excited about M5s now.

Evolved

2,320 posts

135 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
chelme said:
The engine itself is the most successful motorsport engine of all time, not to mention the car's own unparalleled success...One of the all time greats for certain.
Where is this info from and based on what? Did a quick search and can’t find anything to back up that statement.

There are tons of engines I’d think of before this one in relation to motorsport wins. Be interested to see some links etc.

jet_noise

3,503 posts

130 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
Turbobanana said:
In 2000, I had to deliver a brand new M5 to an address in London. It was boring.

The return trip was to be made in a Delta Integrale - nothing special, just a basic 8V, the keys to which were to be picked up from reception at the owner's workplace, somewhere close to the Tower of London. I was directed to the dismal underground car park, where I eventually tracked down a dowdy, dirty looking Delta cowering in a corner with peeling paint, a flat battery and barely any petrol.

A set of jump leads was procured and a passing car flagged down as it was leaving the car park. Soon enough I had it started and cautiously I was on my way, praying the thing would make it first to a petrol station, then 60 miles home.

The engine was left running while I fuelled it, then I locked it (engine still running) with the spare key and paid for the fuel - and probably a Ginster's pasty as well... Nervously I set off.

Within a mile I was grinning like a lunatic, even through London traffic and sitting on the "wrong" side of the car. It was a revelation, and made the M5 look very pedestrian. I later found out that the owner had thrown piles of money at it with pinpoint accuracy, on all the bits that mattered - he had just neglected the cosmetics. The thing drove brilliantly and by the time I got home I was in love.

Next morning it wouldn't start as the battery was flat again. It was a one night stand. I've no idea what happened to it as I left shortly afterwards, but I suspect it was either tracked to within an inch of its life or expensively restored. I should have bought it, as they were relatively cheap at the time, and it rates as my greatest "One That Got Away" car.

I still can't get excited about M5s now.
Good story, well told smile

Turbobanana

1,559 posts

149 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
Evolved said:
chelme said:
The engine itself is the most successful motorsport engine of all time, not to mention the car's own unparalleled success...One of the all time greats for certain.
Where is this info from and based on what? Did a quick search and can’t find anything to back up that statement.

There are tons of engines I’d think of before this one in relation to motorsport wins. Be interested to see some links etc.
DFV?
Kent?
A-Series?
US Crate Engines?
Lotus Twin Cam?

HM-2

4,682 posts

117 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
Absolutely stunning thing and stratospherically out of reach...but I didn't realise they were ~1450kg. An A45 AMG only weights 100kg more!
An ex's dad had one of these a red Evo 2 model with various tweaks. It was staggeringly, terrifyingly fast to 15 year old me.

crankedup

21,881 posts

191 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
Remarkable weapon of a car, etched into my memory for life, even though I have never had the pleasure of actually driving one!! On my bucket list.

Augustus Windsock

1,850 posts

103 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
Went to look at one of these around 2005 in Nottingham.
Probably didn’t help as it was a freezing and misty day (although it ‘should’ have made me think of the rally version in Kielder or similar)
It didn’t drive well (geometry probably needed sorting), the engine bay looked like it had t seen any attention in years and the back edge of the roof was starting to show rust
I bought a mint low mileage ur Quattro instead followed by an RS500, both of which I adored, but I still wish I’d owned an Evo instead of or as well as

Pereldh

192 posts

60 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
Seems you omitted the Delta HF 4WD Turbo out of the story..?

That won WRC the first year of Group A, 1987.


yonex

15,766 posts

116 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
A true hero of a car.

viggyp

1,747 posts

83 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
Turbobanana said:
Evolved said:
chelme said:
The engine itself is the most successful motorsport engine of all time, not to mention the car's own unparalleled success...One of the all time greats for certain.
Where is this info from and based on what? Did a quick search and can’t find anything to back up that statement.

There are tons of engines I’d think of before this one in relation to motorsport wins. Be interested to see some links etc.
DFV?
Kent?
A-Series?
US Crate Engines?
Lotus Twin Cam?
All good engines there. The older versions of the Fiat/Lancia Twin Cam lump were found in the 124/131 Abarths, Lancia 037 and then you had the S4 which is based on those engines and the 8/16v Integrales.

Limpet

3,525 posts

109 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
I miss the days when the only difference between a car you'd watch one of your heroes thrash round a circuit or through a forest stage, and one you could actually go to a dealership and buy yourself, was some carpet, a few toys, and a few component changes.

viggyp

1,747 posts

83 months

Wednesday 27th November
quotequote all
sledge68 said:
The bonnet bulge was born out of a need for higher suspension turrets, you can see the welded extensions on top of the turrets in the evo models, so longer travel struts could be used, then the bonnet would not fit so they had to put a bulge in it. Only Lancia.
Originally, the 16v had the bonnet bulge to clear the engine due to the taller cylinder head and the way in leans forward. True what you say of the Evo as that's why the bulge was spread to the corners.