Speedtail offered with 18 carat gold badges


If your pockets are sufficiently deep to find £2.1m for a hyper GT car, there's a good chance you might also be a fan - or at least very familiar - with all things gold. McLaren reckons so anyway, as it's offering each of the 106 buyers for its new Ultimate Series car the option of having 18-carat white gold badges. They replace the standard fit, peasant-spec aluminium alternatives, and are produced by Vaughtons, a gold specialist that has made, among other things, Olympic gold medals and the FA Cup.

McLaren's logo is laser-etched into the gold before being surrounded by carbon fibre inserts that have been made using the brand's own thin ply technology, which keeps weight to an absolute minimum. The front badge is smaller than the rear one, so it weighs just 100 grams.


The use of gold in the Speedtail's badge has been linked to the use of gold in the F1's engine bay. That's a rather tenuous link, isn't it, because the F1, which is the Speedtail's three-seat spiritual forebear, used gold to keep temperatures under control. In the Speedtail it's there, for, erm, bling. Plus, if gold's not enough, McLaren will produce an even more expensive platinum version of the badge for you instead.

What about if metal's not your thing? Or you're fearful of badge robbers looking for their next medallion centre piece? McLaren can also stick on a transfer of its logo instead, a la Porsche GT. Any guesses as to how many buyers will opt for this option? We suspect not many.


Whatever the material of the badges adorning your Speedtail, there's no question that it will be insanely fast. With an anticipated 1000hp produced by a hybrid 4.0-litre V8 powertain, Speedtail will be the fastest McLaren yet produced, with an officially confirmed top speed of "more than 243mph". Woking won't budge on an exact number yet because it's saving that for its reveal event, which will take place in London and be broadcast online at 1pm on October 26th. We'll have the full story then.


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Comments (28) Join the discussion on the forum

  • housen 18 Oct 2018

    want your badge stolen buy one

    but guess u wont see these motors parked in your avg multi story or train station

  • daveco 18 Oct 2018

    The original McLaren F1, adjusted for inflation, would sell for about £1.25million today.

    That had a bespoke NA V12 and a 240+mph top speed, along with an engine bay covered in gold.

    Soon you'll be able to get McLaren's newest super car iteration for over £2 million.

    It will have a similar V8 powerplant to the rest of the range, a 240+mph top speed, and its badges made out of gold.

  • WCZ 18 Oct 2018

    daveco said:
    The original McLaren F1, adjusted for inflation, would sell for about £1.25million today.
    interesting

  • gigglebug 18 Oct 2018

    daveco said:
    The original McLaren F1, adjusted for inflation, would sell for about £1.25million today.

    That had a bespoke NA V12 and a 240+mph top speed, along with an engine bay covered in gold.

    Soon you'll be able to get McLaren's newest super car iteration for over £2 million.

    It will have a similar V8 powerplant to the rest of the range, a 240+mph top speed, and its badges made out of gold.
    I get your point but presumably at least part of the equation will be that they will actually be making a profit on these where as they didn't necessarily with the F1? I don't know how profit is made but even if it was 15% that would push the F1's price closer to 800K which would make the inflated price today around 1.5 million. Still not as much admittedly.

    I would have thought some of the processes used to manufacture the F1 would be comparatively cheaper now then it was back then though? Does the more commonplace use of carbon fibre mean that it's cost to produce has decreased? Wasn't the cost of painting the F1's really high as they had to develop the process to give a proper finish on carbon fibre?

    Personally I'm awaiting for them to announce what material the oil filler cap is made from, that's the big news!

    Edited by gigglebug on Thursday 18th October 15:48

  • daveco 18 Oct 2018

    gigglebug said:
    daveco said:
    The original McLaren F1, adjusted for inflation, would sell for about £1.25million today.

    That had a bespoke NA V12 and a 240+mph top speed, along with an engine bay covered in gold.

    Soon you'll be able to get McLaren's newest super car iteration for over £2 million.

    It will have a similar V8 powerplant to the rest of the range, a 240+mph top speed, and its badges made out of gold.
    I get your point but presumably at least part of the equation will be that they will actually be making a profit on these where as they didn't necessarily with the F1? I don't know how profit is made but even if it was 15% that would push the F1's price closer to 800K which would make the inflated price today around 1.5 million. Still not as much admittedly.

    I would have thought some of the processes used to manufacture the F1 would be comparatively cheaper now then it was back then though? Does the more commonplace use of carbon fibre mean that it's cost to produce has decreased? Wasn't the cost of painting the F1's really high as they had to develop the process to give a proper finish on carbon fibre?

    Personally I'm awaiting for them to announce what material the oil filler cap is made from, that's the big news!

    Edited by gigglebug on Thursday 18th October 15:48
    I would have thought the same.

    I know McLaren only just broke even on the original F1, so you can't blame them for doing what they have to do to maintain healthy profits.

    I doubt very few of their current customer base will draw these comparisons between new and old, but a Ferrari superfast with its 800hp NA V12 seems a lot more special to me.




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