Lexus GS F | Spotted


It's been nearly two years since Spotted turned its attention to the lesser-seen Lexus GS F. Back in 2017 we marvelled at the toll depreciation had taken right out of the gate - the barely 12-month-old example having lost Β£30k after just 9k miles - and wondered how far the V8-powered saloon would fall before the market naturally steadied the ship.

Now we know. Today's example, registered in 2017, and with only 5k additional miles on the clock is valued at Β£37,500 - still eye-opening, but a much more modest descent compared to its previous free-fall. One good reason for that is proclaimed in the advert: "very rare" it tells us more than once. It's not quite true, of course - PH's barometer for 'very rare' being homologated Group B hatchbacks - but certainly there are not many examples of the GS F that call the UK home. Not compared to its German rivals, at any rate.

Then there's the question of value for money. With a 473hp naturally-aspirated V8, conspicuous good looks, a predictably lengthy standard kit list and Lexus's famous build quality in the plus column, the GS F was just about credible at Β£70k. At almost half that it is an outrageous bargain. A BMW M5 of similar miles and vintage would likely come with a Β£20k premium.


Granted, the F90 M5 is the superior machine, especially in performance terms. But Lexus knew this would be the case from the outset. Instead it wanted the GS F to be different - hence its decision to retain an atmospheric 5.0-litre V8 rather than reach for the parts bin marked 'turbochargers'. It did not scrimp on the enhancements required elsewhere either.

The body-in-white was said to boast more torsional rigidity than the standard model thanks to additional bracing and new joining techniques; lower, stiffer suspension was complimented by new mounts, forged control arms and uprated ZF Sachs dampers; there was a torque-vectoring active rear diff and Brembo brakes. The car that resulted was duly firmer, flatter and faster in a way that might credibly be called its own.

True, it was also lumbered with an eight-speed slusher not really up to the job of interacting with a demanding, big displacement motor, and the GS F isn't quite clever enough to run the full gambit of modern super-saloon capability. But for significantly less than the price of our longterm Volkswagen Golf GTI TCR, that shortfall is now easier to forgive. If the price is anything to go by, it looks like the same thought has occurred to everyone else, too.


SPECIFICATION - LEXUS GS F

Engine: 4,969cc, V8
Transmission: 8-speed auto, rear-wheel drive
Power (hp): 477@7,100rpm
Torque ( lb ft): 391@4,800-5,600rpm
MPG: 25.2
CO2: 260g/km
First registered: 2017
Recorded mileage: 14,000
Price new: Β£69,995
Yours for: Β£37,500

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Comments (63) Join the discussion on the forum

  • Camry_Man 17 Nov 2019

    This or a lightly used Merc S500 coupe? hmm.....

  • Augustus Windsock 17 Nov 2019

    “One good reason for that is proclaimed in the advert: "very rare" it tells us more than once. It's not quite true, of course - PH's barometer for 'very rare' being homologated Group B hatchbacks - but certainly there are not many examples of the GS F that call the UK home. ”

    According to ‘howmanyleft’ there are just 65, so compared to the 11 roadgoing Meteo 6R4 GrpB cars (according to the same site) these are to be be found around every corner in comparison...

    Anyhoo, compared to the mentioned M5, why would you want one? The M5 is surely better in every department (for me), and in addition the Lexus always looks over-bodied or under-wheeled unlike the M5 which has perfect proportions

    Edited by Augustus Windsock on Sunday 17th November 08:28

  • mstrbkr 17 Nov 2019

    There’s a bit more free falling to come I think. Okay if you’re planning to keep it for years and years though.

  • Pommy 17 Nov 2019

    Augustus Windsock said:
    “One good reason for that is proclaimed in the advert: "very rare" it tells us more than once. It's not quite true, of course - PH's barometer for 'very rare' being homologated Group B hatchbacks - but certainly there are not many examples of the GS F that call the UK home. ”

    According to ‘howmanyleft’ there are just 65, so compared to the 11 roadgoing Meteo 6R4 GrpB cars (according to the same site) these are to be be found around every corner in comparison...

    Anyhoo, compared to the mentioned M5, why would you want one? The M5 is surely better in every department (for me), and in addition the Lexus always looks over-bodied or under-wheeled unlike the M5 which has perfect proportions

    Edited by Augustus Windsock on Sunday 17th November 08:28
    M5 better in all areas? Apart from one - this is less likely to turn in to a bankrupting proposition out of warranty.

  • belleair302 17 Nov 2019

    As an everyday 'performance saloon', these are epic cars. Everything works, no rattles, electrical issues and with good dealer network servicing and parts is not an issue. Not the sharpest tool in the box, but for 99% of drivers in 99% of daily driving situations this trumps an M5. Having owned both an M5 and a Lexus GS, but not an F, the Lexus didn't cost me anywhere near what the M5 did and didn't lose as much money upon resale. Under rated cars these.

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